The Man in the Moon (1991) Poster

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9/10
Very Good
hmpulham8 February 2003
I doubt I would have ever rented the film, it looked too much like just a teenage love story. However, a friend who's taste I respect, recommended it. I thought the film was excellent. "The Man in The Moon" is one of those rare movies that gets it right. A warm and tender story of a family, and growing up, without being maudlin. It was the first time I'd seen Reese Witherspoon, and she was indeed impressive. You knew she had something special about her, like seeing a very young Elizabeth Taylor, in an old MGM movie. This film is idealized, yet honest. Many of us grow up with both joys and some pain, and there is an unexpected twist, that when it hits -- it hits hard.
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10/10
A Beautiful, Heartbreaking Film
imadj5 October 2003
"The Man in the Moon" is a beautifully realistic look at life through the eyes of an adolescent. Director Robert Mulligan magically re-creates screenwriter Jenny Wingfield's autobiography of her childhood with gorgeous cinematography and a haunting, lyrical musical score. This film hits home as one of the most powerful and emotionally affecting films in recent times.

This film is incredible, all the acting first rate, especially Sam Waterston and an astonishing performance by Reese Witherspoon in her film debut. You will feel every emotion as this life changing summer in 1957 on the Trant family farm comes to a conclusion.

"The Man in the Moon" was a limited release in 1991, and you will love the fact that most of you're family and friends will probably have never heard of it. Buy this dvd and enjoy 100 minutes of pure poetic art. This film is truely the essence of filmaking at its finest.
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10/10
Beautiful Coming Of Age Film
CitizenCaine1 March 2004
Warning: Spoilers
A 14 year old girl develops her first serious crush on the 17 year old boy that lives near by, while simultaneously trying to overcome her feelings of inadequacy in comparison to her older sister. That is the simple premise of this beautiful, poetic coming of age film from Director Robert Mulligan. Mulligan is famous for previously directing Summer of '42 in 1971 and To Kill A Mockingbird in 1962, two giants of the coming of age genre. Here he directs newcomers in the principal roles: Reese Witherspoon, in her film debut, as the 14 year old girl; Emily Warfield, as the older sister; Jason London, as Court, the 17 year old boy. Reese Witherspoon is astonishingly good in her film debut, displaying every emotion that a 14 year old girl feels in experiencing young love and hurt, never striking a false note. Warfield and London are both equally good as well. The film accurately depicts each adolescent's thoughts or feelings in regard to love with heartfelt sensitivity, never crossing over into maudlin excess even once. Kudos to the autobiographical screenplay from Jenny Wingfield; this is one of the very few films about young love that is honest and consistent in tone without being emotionally dishonest or sensationalist. The music is wonderfully simple, accentuating the tone and mood from scene to scene, but never becoming intrusive. The beautiful cinematography is by famed horror director Freddie Francis, who was in his 70's when this was shot. Tess Harper and Sam Waterston play the girls' parents with dead aim accuracy for 1957, caring, strict, and emotionally simple. Gail Strickland is good also as the boy's mother. There are feelings to sort out, lessons to learn, and truths to face in this sweet-natured film that packs an emotional wallop. To date, this is Robert Mulligan's last film. This is one of the very best films of 1991. **** of 4 stars.
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8/10
Touching drama about first love.
michaelRokeefe7 May 2000
Reese Witherspoon plays Dani, a young country girl that falls madly in love with the new 17 year old neighbor, Court, played by Jason London. Court tries his best to make Dani realize that the difference in their ages would make a love relationship improbable. Soon the nubile charm of Dani starts winning over Court's will. Next enters the meeting of Dani's older sister, played by Emily Warfield, and the beginning of a short lived love/jealousy problem.

Tess Harper and Sam Waterston round out the cast. This is a fresh, free spirited; but heartbreaking drama that touches down deep. Feel free to cry.
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10/10
One of the best movies I have ever seen
captainblackadder9 December 2003
Perfect movies are rare. Even my favorite films tend to have flaws - Rear Window looks a little stagey at times, Chris Elliot's character in Groundhog Day doesn't work, the music score in Best Years of Our Lives is too cheesy, the beginning of Nights of Cabiria is a little too slow - but this film is perfectly executed from start to finish.

The script is brilliant, the acting is superb all around (although Reese Witherspoon and Sam Waterston are amazing, the whole cast shines), the directing and the photography are inspired, and the music score is touching without being intrusive (like some Miramax scores that are too manipulative). Every sad moment is truly moving, every light moment makes me smile. This truly is one of the best films I have ever seen and I wish there were more films like it.

I am glad that Reese Witherspoon has gone on to stardom after this film, but I am sorry to see that her recent movies are so much more escapist and silly than this serious film which is about real people, real feelings and real problems. Brilliant! A must-see.
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8/10
Heartbreaking Story About First Love
Darkest_Rose16 July 2003
Dani(Reese Witherspoon) has always been very close with her older sister Maureen(Emily Warfield) until they both start falling in love with their neighbor Court(Jason London). But it is not after a terrible tragedy strikes that the two sisters realize that nothing can keep them apart and that their love for each other will never fade away.

This was truly a heartbreaking story about first love. Probably the most painful story about young love that I have ever seen. All the acting is amazing and Reese Witherspoon gives a great performance in her first movie. I would give The Man in the Moon 8.5/10
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10/10
The moment between childhood and adulthood . . . painful . . . beautiful . . . and perfect!
dark_elf0219 October 2005
Warning: Spoilers
That magical moment in life, that point between the beautiful innocence of childhood, and the confusing whirlwind that marks adulthood . . . this is what this movie is all about.

Danni (wonderfully played by Reese Witherspoon) is right at that moment in life when the movie starts. She swoons over Elvis, playing his records and wishfully thinking about love. Maureen her sister will soon be off to college, has no trouble with attracting boys, is beautiful, and seems to have it all figured out although she doesn't. She dates a local loser whos father is also after her, and just wishes she could find a decent boy and be swept off her feet. Danni like most young teenagers wishes she could be anyone else but herself because most teenagers think that who they are just isn't good enough. She wants to be Maureen but doesn't see that she is beautiful herself.

The moment adulthood begins to intrude itself upon her life is when she meets Court Foster for the first time. Court whos father has recently died has moved to their old farm to work it with his mother and two younger brothers. He has been thrust responsibility when he should be having fun. On one particular hot day he goes to the pond and jumps in only to find Danni skinny dipping. They yell and argue and Danni leaves. But they see each other a day later when Courts mother is invited to Danni's to visit old friends(Danni's Parents). Danni becomes attracted to Court, and Court to Danni. She is a tomboy and is spunky, has attitude and says whats on her mind.

Court is 17 and Danni 14 and he knows it but they continue to grow closer with their days at the pond between Court working the farm. By the time Court kisses her one day, Danni is smitten. Danni's father tells her to invite Court to the house and he does. but things are uncomfortable for Court on his "sort of date". The silence though is broken by his meeting with Maureen who has yet to see Court. One look between the two and its all over. The looks of pain and defeat on Danni's face are both beautiful in their trueness to life and painful at the same time. The rest of the movie I will not tell but the movie has more to it than a relationship between a boy and two sisters.

The greatness of the movie is in its depiction of lifes moments both beautiful and painful and the relationship between two sisters whose love is tested by both a boy that they love, and the pain they must endure both together and individually. Danni eventually marks her entrance into the world when she sees that the world is unfair, painful, and maybe even a little less hopeful than when the movie started. Few movies can truly capture the wonder of childhood and the pain of adulthood so perfectly. This movie has since the first time I watched it stuck in my mind. Its in the my Top 100 movie list and deservedly so. I only wish more movies like this were made, because if so . . . my faith in Hollywood would be a lot better.
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8/10
Very good movie
kenday126 June 2003
As I watched this movie I began to feel very nostalgic. As a child growing up in a rural area I felt as if I was a kid again! The swimming pond (it's called a "tank" in Central Texas), the running through the countryside like a wild free spirit! The story was very believable and I totally lost it and cried toward the end. Through the pain we go through in life...life goes on and there can be forgiveness.
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9/10
beautiful love triangle story
TheUnknown837-111 June 2007
Here's the kind of love story that I do enjoy watching. And mostly, it's for two reasons. One, it concentrates of young people, VERY young people. People who are still in their teens and are experiencing love for the first time, or at least think they are. All of us have been there in our lives and "The Man in the Moon" is a magnificent reflection upon our memories, maybe adding on a few more details and enhancing it further than any of us have experienced. The second reason is that is a love triangle. And I do believe that as teens, it's the most dramatic. And the story is so well developed that you believe the characters could really be in love, or are just so new to love that they just strongly believe they are and after a tragedy or so occurs, will believe it for the rest of their lives.

The cast of "The Man in the Moon" is full of great talented names. It stars Sam Waterston, who is truly a versatile actor, well capable of playing tough district attorneys as well as strict, yet caring and wise fathers as in this film. Also there is Tess Harper, Jason London, and a young, young Reese Witherspoon. You look at the young, talented actress as she is at age fourteen and you think that about ten years down the road, she's going to win the Academy Award. All members of the cast pull off great performances and with the dialogue of the compelling screenplay, they are enhanced into looking like real people in real situations. As if it all really happened. This the kind of movie that I would like to see come out more often. Love story or not. I would love to see films that make everything look real and is not phony or disbelievable in any way.
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8/10
Pretty good film.
LebowskiT100014 August 2002
"The Man In The Moon" is a pretty good movie. It is very touching at times and is very well done in all respects. I wouldn't say the film was terribly original, but what is these days?

The cast members all did a great job with their respective roles. I really enjoyed seeing Reese Witherspoon at such a young age, and does quite a good job. Jason London does a fine job as well. And the only other person I recognized was Sam Waterston, who did a fantastic job with his role. I really liked Sam's character (Matthew Trant) a lot. At times he seemed to be the kind of father you dread, but in the end you really like his character. The rest of the cast was very good as well.

If you're into touching movies about growing up and dealing with what life throws at you, then you ought to watch this film. I'd suggest reading the plot synopsis and if that sounds like something you'd be interested in, then go for it. Anyhow, hope you enjoy the film, thanks for reading,

-Chris
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8/10
Little Big Movie
marcslope28 February 2001
It's a generic coming-of-age story -- think "The Member of the Wedding," "Summer of '42," "A Summer Place," even "Little Women" -- and there are moments where Mulligan might have omitted the soupy music, not used slow-motion, or played down the golden-lit prettiness of the setting. Otherwise, it's done with rare emotional perfect-pitch. Nothing's forced, every line has feeling, and the pacing is just right. Even the below-A-list casting helps: Bigger movie stars with more recognizable personalities might have overwhelmed the material. In particular, Witherspoon is excellent: Her line readings are fresh and original, and her body language is just right for a gawky, hoydenish 14-year-old on the eve of womanhood. Waterston is also very fine, even if he has to spend much of the movie climbing in and out of the family truck.

One senses that the film's makers were aware of its unpromising commercial prospects -- no big stars, no big car crashes, no special effects -- and consciously decided to make the best possible movie, box office be damned. It's intimate and honest, and it sticks to the ribs. If you find yourself misting up at the end, you don't have to feel you've been duped.
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6/10
What a .... Reese!
xristinad5 July 2018
WOW what a film debut for the 14 year old at that time Reese! No wonder why she was cast for one of the leading roles and not for the extras she auditioned for... Her acting on the film explains her later took off in Hollywood. I think though that her recent movies don't do her justice.. Overall, a good film, with pretty scenery and good photography. Other than Reese and Mr Waterston, the rest of the cast is ok and so is the plot.
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6/10
Coming of Age Classic
HotToastyRag24 October 2017
If there's any director in Hollywood who deserves a crown for conquering the coming-of-age genre, it's Robert Mulligan, director of To Kill a Mockingbird and Summer of '42. His last film was The Man in the Moon, one of the most revered modern coming-of-age films. It takes place in 1957, during the summer a teenaged Reese Witherspoon's life changes forever.

In Reese's first movie, she's a tomboy, but she's still adorable in her transition out of adolescence, and as she's done in almost every other film since, she melts the hearts of the audience. She stomps around in overalls and smacks her gum as if it never occurred to her to care about her appearance, but she's just as cute in those scenes as she is when she finally dolls up and tries to act like a regular teenage girl.

Fourteen-year-old Reese is very close to her older sister, Emily Warfield, but clashes at times with her parents, Sam Waterston and Tess Harper, who don't seem to understand her difficult age. When a new family moves in next door, complete with three teenage boys, everything changes. Reese gets to know one of the boys, Jason London, but as time passes, her feelings grow into more than just friendship.

There's a lot more to the plot, but I'd rather not spoil anything. Needless to say, there are all the classic elements to a poignant coming-of-age story, including domestic troubles, love triangles, self-discovery, tragedy, and the bonds of family. Just as in classics like My Girl, you're going to need your Kleenexes during this one. It doesn't matter whether you have issues with your dad, mom, sister, or remember a bittersweet time before you grew up, there are several scenes that will inspire tears. Reese has great chemistry with her on screen family, and I guarantee the parents in the audience will identify with Sam Waterston's protectiveness and wisdom.

This one isn't for the faint of heart, but if you're in the mood for a good cry this weekend, or if you're craving a nostalgia movie with lots of Elvis Presley songs, rent The Man in the Moon.

Kiddy Warning: I'd probably let my kids watch this one, but I just wanted to warn you, because everyone has different tastes, that there are some upsetting scenes and violence involving children.
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10/10
Great movie, great soundtrack
ltj368 March 2000
I watched this movie by chance, get curious by the trailer on TV. I like when I discover movies like this, little, tender stories about ordinary people. Even if the end is tragic, "The Man in the Moon" has some funny moments, especially in the first characterization of Dani, with her innocent and pure love affair with Court. It's really a beautiful, moving love story with 3 high points: the performance of Reese Witherspoon, who maintained her promises in the world of cinema, the beautiful cinematography by the "Old Lion" Freddie Francis and the fantastic score by James Newton Howard, which is really the soul of the movie. His themes (which deserved an Oscar nomination) are so intimate and lyric that it seems they had transformed the screenplay in music.
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10/10
Everyone who's lived in a rural area should watch this film. **spoiler**
emsummers111117 June 2003
Warning: Spoilers
Not only is this movie a great film for basic cinematography (screenplay, acting, setting, etc.) but also for it's realism. This movie could take place in any farm or rural setting. It makes no difference if the movie takes place in Louisiana or if it would take place in Kansas. The story and the messages it includes would remain the same. This movie shows family values and connections for an older audience, while at the same time it shows youthful behavior for the younger viewers. Everyone who watches this will walk away with something having touched them personally, I know I did. The ending hits way too close to home for me not to burst into tears every time I watch it. The ending stresses the importance of farm safety, and everyone who has ever worked on a farm needs to see this film. Not paying attention and carelessness gets you into dangerous situations.
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8/10
An incredible movie
katiedempsey-331353 March 2019
Warning: Spoilers
I really enjoyed this movie. The acting was fantastic especially from Reece Witherspoon (Dani) and Jason London (court). At the beginning of the movie we see a lot of chemistry between their two characters and it slowely builds during the film until Dani's older sister gets in the way. In my opinion I wanted Dani and Court to be together even if it was only a short while because I thought they had more Chemistry than Court and Dani's older sister, but I understand why because the age gap would of been an issue for Court. The ending was heartbreaking and tear jerking. I would recommend this to girls looking for a good romance movie but don't get to upset when the two your rooting for don't end up together !!!!
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6/10
Good Beginning, terrible ending.
PurplePanther25 July 2007
Warning: Spoilers
This movie started out great, but the ending completely ruined it for me. It wasn't that I would have liked for Dani and Court to end up together, because I realize that is unrealistic, but the fact that they chose to throw the two of them into a romantic triangle with Dani's older sister, have Court completely and inexplicably shun Danielle, and have Court and Maureen claim to love each other after only TWO DAYS of knowing each other completely, and I mean, COMPLETELY ruined this movie. You can guess that it was Court's confusion over being interested in someone so young as Dani despite his resistance was the reason for his odd and annoying behavior towards Dani after he'd met her sister, but that is never explained. Not even in a way where you can know something for sure without it being spoken. It was frustrating and obnoxious. I also feel like his death was a complete cop out. The minute Dani finds out that Court was with her sister, he is killed my a tractor (which is oddly hilarious and makes for good poetic justice, in my opinion), and the two are never able to confront the relationship between them and how it had been tarnished. So much felt unfinished with this movie and not in a "well, that's life" sort of way, it was more of a "wait, huh, what just happened???" kind of way. I also hated the how Maureen's "grief" over the boy she had known and loved for two days was made out to be more important and significant that Dani's. It literally made no sense to me. This movie had great potential in the beginning, but the way it ended just sucked to me. Overall, I didn't feel like it was a complete waste of time, but it did disappoint me greatly. 6/10.
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10/10
a tear jerker!
syndarre13 August 2000
Loved the film! This was my first glimpse at both Reese Witherspoon and Jason London, both of which are two of my favorites. Must say that no matter how many times I've seen this movie I can't help but tear up. One of those movies that should become a classic for all.
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4/10
Unsatisfying characters & plot
claytonchurch115 July 2013
I like romances. Here's what I liked: the scenery (I got the "feel" of living in rural Louisiana, and that was great); and Matt's good, fatherly words to Dani on the boat were worth the movie. Here's where the movie failed me. Though I love Sam Waterston, I'm a northerner who's now lived in the South for 14 years, and see here and elsewhere that when northerners (Sam's from Boston) try to play Southerners, they get so much wrong, which Sam does. I like his fatherly role, but his style, mannerisms, and accent are just out of place as a Louisiana dad. If I were a Southerner, I'd feel very poorly represented. Sometimes the writing was just bad, with characters saying things way too "philosophy of life-ish." They were little monologues that were out of place. Lastly, with the writing, characters are sometimes having all this emotion one way or the other when "all that" wouldn't be possible to have built up in the character in the short time frame that the storyline proposes. There's betrayal in the movie that is simply accepted by all the characters (but one), so the person wronged is never given any sense of consolation or true apology. That left me wanting. Maureen's character was flat--in the end, I needed some kind of character growth (realizations) in her that the writer(s) never delivered. That was disappointing.
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7/10
quite real, quite sad (minor spoilers)
RealSmiff21 January 2004
Warning: Spoilers
I had heard good things about this film and was, you guessed it, a bit disappointed. Reese Witherspoon is as promised surprisingly good, surprisingly confident, at a young age; really all the (small) cast are quite solid, in their simple 50s American setting. The reason I didn't rate this film higher is mainly that towards the end, the grief shown by the older sister didn't seem so real and this pulled me out of the film a bit. Perhaps we are expected to fill in the plot, or perhaps the film needed to be a bit longer. Maureen's character is quite underdeveloped I think. It is understandable that Dani (Reese W., the younger) would be traumatised and angry, but why is her sister shown to be more upset? Because she's a few years older? Hasn't the end rather undermined the rest of the film? The pacing of the movie makes it seem that Maureen and Court have only just met, when he gets tractored (warning: this scene is surprisingly brutal, in retrospect it seems like it might have been trying to shock a bit. well it works!). It depends what you want - if you want the girls' happy story of young love that it seems like you're going to get, you're in for a surprise. Man in the Moon is both quaint and dreamy and a harsh coming of age film – a rather awkward combination? I liked the character of Court though, I can see what girls watching this might be watching. And I loved that they had the courage to both let him hurt the younger sister (most men would, most films wouldn't) and get killed.

7/10 on my pretty harsh ratings scale. For some reason I found Jason London on a tractor funny.
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10/10
Lovely Coming Of Age Tale
Noirdame7914 April 2006
Warning: Spoilers
I saw this movie as a teenager and immediately identified with Reese Witherspoon's portrayal of Dani Trant, a 14-year-old tomboy in rural Louisiana circa 1957. She feels that she will never be as beautiful as her older sister, Maureen (a now rarely seen Emily Warfield), and feeling out of place in terms of her conservative Baptist upbringing. Then seventeen year old Court Foster (Jason London), the son of her mother's close friend (Gail Strickland) moves in next door, Dani experiences her first crush, while Court enjoys her company, and willful spirit. Dani succeeds in getting her first kiss from him, but as soon as he sees Maureen, he falls head over heels for her, leaving Dani behind. The sisters' close bond is fractured severely by the rivalry that erupts, which only deepens when Court dies in a tragic accident. The girls then are made to realize how much they need each other.

Sam Waterson and Tess Harper are just perfect as the loving parents, trying to balance their daughters' individuality, at the same time trying to keep the family together. The beautiful cinematography, and the wonderful soundtrack featuring Elvis Presley, The Platters and many more contribute wonderfully to the film's atmosphere of a simpler time.

A touching coming-of-age film with a timeless message.
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10/10
A heartbreaker, but a great heartbreaker!
donmac726 March 2000
There is so much of worth in this movie that it is hard to know where to begin with praise. Let me begin by expressing my admiration for a perfect portrayal by Reese Witherspoon. That her performance stands out in the excellent cast is praise indeed. Robert Mulligan has seldom disappointed those of us who have admired his work. Every frame of The Man in the Moon is evidence of film making at its best.
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10/10
Superb Family Film -- One of the best ever made
jsteiger30 July 2004
This "coming of age" film deals with the experiences of two young girls, Dani and Maureen, as they learn about life and love one fateful summer.

Directed by Robert Mulligan, famous for his superb work in "To Kill a Mockingbird," the film never hits a false note. All the acting is superb. As Dani, Reese Witherspoon makes a stunning film debut. Watching this beautifully photographed and superbly directed and edited film, I felt like I was looking through a window to reality, rather than watching a movie.

I have watched this movie at least 5 times, and can honestly say that it is one of the single best movies ever made about being young, being in love, and going through the feelings, challenges, and changes of young adulthood. Families with children between 10 and 15 should watch it together, and use it as a discussion piece, as it raises a number of issues about sibling rivalry, how to deal with being in love, the responsibilities of a parent, etc.
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10/10
One of my favorites!
karen-loethen17 May 2020
I saw this one decades ago. The beautiful relationship between the sisters hit me right in the heart. The intensity and dreaminess of the younger sister, Dani, played by Reece Witherspoon in her first ever role, side-by-side with her sister's pragmatism and maturity reminded me so much of my sister and I. Maureen, Dani's older sister, played by Emily Warfield, also breaks the heart with her burgeoning relationship with Court.

Reece simply shines in this gorgeously filmed story about first love and the pain of heartbreak.

Watch it!
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10/10
Poignant Coming of Age
kirbylee70-599-5261799 November 2017
Warning: Spoilers
I remember seeing this movie long ago when it was first released to video. Yes, it's that old. At the time I remember thinking it was a good movie but it never really stuck with me for some reason. I always recalled the name and that of the young actor in the lead role but it wasn't until revisiting it just now that I was dumbstruck by the talents of this young woman. She was just 14 at the time and this was her first film. Her name is Reese Witherspoon.

The movie tells the story of two sisters in 1957 farm country. Growing up together they are the best of friends with Maureen Trant (Emily Warfield) the older of the two and about to go off to college at Duke. Dani Trant (Witherspoon) is only 14 and coming out of her tomboy phase, in love with Elvis and about to become a young woman.

The summer the story takes place in changes everything about the two girls. In the case of Maureen she's unsure of what her future holds, not quite certain if she should get her education or simply marry a young man and become a housewife like her mother. She has a steady beau but his constant need for something more physical than she wants to offer is a block for the two of them.

Dani on the other hand still loves to jump in the nearby watering hole and spend her summer having fun when she can get away with it. Her father Matthew (Sam Waterston) wants her to start taking responsibility but her mother Abigail (Tess Harper) tells him that he must have missed that age when she was too young to run off and now is suddenly too old to have fun.

The catalyst for change comes in the form of new neighbors. Mother Marie (Gail Strickland) is an old friend of the Trants. A single mother raising three boys two are at that age of being unmanageable. Her eldest Court (Jason London) at 16 is the man of the family and on his shoulders lies the farm that they've just returned to.

Dani meets Court by accident before being formally introduced while swimming. The two are combative but beneath it all you can tell that she's attracted to him, something she's not quite used to and doesn't know how to deal with. An attraction between the two develops but Court knows full well he is too old for Dani. But he might be just the right age for Maureen.

In the middle of this possible romantic triangle are a few other issues to deal with. First off is Abigail's pregnancy which comes into question after she trips outside in a storm trying to find Dani who ran off for a midnight swim. It's an event that nearly causes a few rifts in the family. Then there is Court trying to take on the responsibilities of a man while still in high school.

Before the end of the film all issues are resolved. Those resolutions are not easy ones and much pain is involved. What is left to discover before the credits role is just who will come out unscathed? The movie is a marvel to watch on so many levels. Director Robert Mulligan draws some amazing performances from all involved. His experiences making movies like TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD and SUMMER OF '42 show how capable he is and this film just proves that even more. Freddie Francis is the director of photography and he brings to life the slow buzz of bugs in the trees and the slow soft hear of summer to life with each image.

All of the actors involved do a fantastic job. But most impressive is that done by Witherspoon. This is not to slight the other actors involved but the fact that this was her first film, that she went to a casting call hoping to get a minor supporting role and came away with the lead makes her performance all that more amazing. There are moments watching the film when subtle nuances in the look on her face would make you think she'd been doing this for ages. Why she was overlooked for an Oscar nomination for this performance is beyond me.

Released in 1991 this movie has never found itself in heavy rotation on movie channels or talked about much. That's a shame. I found it to be one of the most touching and enjoyable films I've watched in some time. Hopefully word of mouth will help others to find this film. It deserves more attention than it's received. Witherspoon has grown to show what a formidable presence she is and this is the movie that started it all.
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