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Oliver Stone movies: All 20 films as director, ranked worst to best, including ‘JFK,’ ‘Platoon,’ ‘Salvador’

  • Gold Derby
Oliver Stone movies: All 20 films as director, ranked worst to best, including ‘JFK,’ ‘Platoon,’ ‘Salvador’
Oliver Stone celebrates his 73rd birthday on September 15, 2019. The three-time Oscar winner has courted controversy with a series of technically ambitious, rabble rousing political dramas, chronicling the highs and lows of American history. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 20 of his films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1946, Stone served in the Vietnam War before enrolling in NYU film school. He first came to prominence as a screenwriter, winning an Oscar for penning “Midnight Express” (Best Original Screenplay in 1978) before writing “Conan the Barbarian” (1982), “Scarface” (1983) and “Year of the Dragon” (1985). During this same period, he directed the low-budget horror films “Seizure” (1974) and “The Hand” (1981).

SEEOscar Best Director Gallery: Every Winner In Academy Award History

He emerged as a an A-list director when he was 40 years old with a pair of acclaimed war dramas released in 1986: “Salvador” and “Platoon.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oliver Stone movies: All 20 films as director, ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Oliver Stone movies: All 20 films as director, ranked worst to best
Oliver Stone celebrates his 73rd birthday on September 15, 2019. The three-time Oscar winner has courted controversy with a series of technically ambitious, rabble rousing political dramas, chronicling the highs and lows of American history. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 20 of his films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1946, Stone served in the Vietnam War before enrolling in NYU film school. He first came to prominence as a screenwriter, winning an Oscar for penning “Midnight Express” (Best Original Screenplay in 1978) before writing “Conan the Barbarian” (1982), “Scarface” (1983) and “Year of the Dragon” (1985). During this same period, he directed the low-budget horror films “Seizure” (1974) and “The Hand” (1981).

He emerged as a an A-list director when he was 40 years old with a pair of acclaimed war dramas released in 1986: “Salvador” and “Platoon.” Both earned him Best Original Screenplay nominations,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Venom 2 cinematographer confirms return of Woody Harrelson for the sequel

  • JoBlo
A little over a week ago, it was announced that Robert Richardson, the cinematographer behind Platoon, JFK, Shutter Island, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, and much more, had signed on to shoot the Venom sequel for Andy Serkis. While speaking with Collider, the acclaimed cinematographer explained what drew him to to the superhero genre, and while doing so, he also seemingly confirmed that Woody Harrelson
See full article at JoBlo »

‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ Cinematographer Robert Richardson Is Shooting Andy Serkis’ ‘Venom 2’

‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ Cinematographer Robert Richardson Is Shooting Andy Serkis’ ‘Venom 2’
Cinematographer Robert Richardson, best known for his Oscar-winning work with Martin Scorsese and Oliver Stone, has signed on to shoot “Venom 2,” marking the first time he’ll photograph a superhero movie. He most recently filmed “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” directed by frequent collaborator Quentin Tarantino.

Sony announced earlier this month that it had hired motion-capture master Andy Serkis to direct the follow-up to the critically panned box office smash “Venom.” The films’ eponymous character was first introduced as one of Spider-Man’s enemies. Tom Hardy is reprising his lead role as journalist Eddie Brock, whose body becomes host to an alien parasite that endows him with superhuman abilities.

Richardson’s agent, Devin Mann of Iconic Talent, confirmed to IndieWire the veteran cinematographer had signed on to “Venom 2.” Richardson and Serkis previously worked together on Serkis’ directorial debut, the 2017 biographical drama “Breathe.”

Richardson’s work spans nearly
See full article at Indiewire »

Asc Awards 2019: ‘Cold War’ Cinematographer Łukasz Żal Upsets ‘Roma’s’ Alfonso Cuarón

  • Indiewire
Asc Awards 2019: ‘Cold War’ Cinematographer Łukasz Żal Upsets ‘Roma’s’ Alfonso Cuarón
Polish cinematographer Łukasz Żal (“Cold War”) scored an upset victory over director Alfonso Cuarón (Oscar Best Picture frontrunner “Roma”) in the battle of

black-and-white movies Saturday night at the 33rd annual Asc Awards (at the Ray Dolby Ballroom in Hollywood).

While Cuarón was the first director ever nominated by the Asc in the theatrical category to shoot his own movie, it really wasn’t such a stretch that the cinematographers went with their own by rewarding Żal. He previously shared the Asc Spotlight Award in 2014 with co-dp Ryszard Lenczewski for their work on the black-and-white “Ida” (also directed by Pawel Pawlikowski).

In terms of the Oscar race, however, the Asc has only been an average bellwether, which tips in Cuarón’s favor in his bid to become the first director honored for shooting his own movie. Since 2000, only nine times have they matched (including Emmanuel “Chivo” Lubezki’s three consecutive wins).

With “Cold War,
See full article at Indiewire »

The 100 Greatest Achievements in Cinematography in the 20th Century, According to Asc

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) this year, they’ve polled their members to determine 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography of the 20th century. Topping the list is David Lean’s epic Lawrence of Arabia, shot by Freddie Young. Also in the top ten is Blade Runner (Jordan Cronenweth), The Conformist (Vittorio Storaro), Days of Heaven (Néstor Almendros), and more.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, he said “Asc members wanted to call attention to the most significant achievements of the cinematographer’s art but not refer to one achievement as ‘better’ than another. The selected films represent a range of styles, eras and visual artistry, but most importantly, it commemorates films that are inspirational or influential to Asc members and have exhibited enduring influence on generations of filmmakers.”

See the top 10 below, along with the full list.

1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Freddie Young,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Alfonso Cuarón Leads Asc Cinematography Nominations for ‘Roma’

Alfonso Cuarón Leads Asc Cinematography Nominations for ‘Roma’
Alfonso Cuarón (“Roma”) will compete against feature cinematographers Matthew Libatique (“A Star Is Born”), Robbie Ryan (“The Favourite”), Linus Sandgren (“First Man”), and Łukasz Żal (“Cold War”) in the 33rd annual Asc Awards. They will be held February 9 at the Ray Dolby Ballroom in Hollywood, marking the Asc’s 100th anniversary.

However, after making history last year as the first woman Dp nominated for her work on “Mudbound,” Rachel Morrison was snubbed for Best Picture contender “Black Panther.” Also left out was previous Asc nominee James Laxton (“Moonlight”) for Barry Jenkins’ follow-up, “If Beale Street Could Talk.”

For Cuarón, this marks the first time that the Asc has nominated a director in the feature category for serving as his own Dp. Previously, Cary Fukunaga (“Bond 25”) was nominated in the Spotlight category for “Beasts of No Nation,” which he both directed and shot.

In addition, “Roma” and “Cold War” mark
See full article at Indiewire »

How ‘A Private War’ cinematographer Robert Richardson shot the film like a documentary [Exclusive Video Interview]

How ‘A Private War’ cinematographer Robert Richardson shot the film like a documentary [Exclusive Video Interview]
When Robert Richardson, a three-time Oscar-winning cinematographer, started work on “A Private War,” he wasn’t the only one who had their hands on the camera. The film is the first narrative feature by documentarian Matthew Heineman, who DPed his own docs, including “Cartel Land” (2015) and “City of Ghosts” (2017), and was a littler reluctant to relinquish control, Richardson revealed at Gold Derby’s Meet the Experts: Cinematographers panel, moderated by this author (watch above).

“The beginning of the journey was a little more complicated. The first few days was like, ‘Hmm.’ He wasn’t 100 percent sure he wanted Richardson to be operating his camera,” Richardson said. “And then he finally went ‘All right. Do it.’ We’d have conversations. I’d say, ‘Work with the actors. Don’t worry. You tell me what you want to do with the camera, I’ll do it.’”

What they both wanted to do
See full article at Gold Derby »

Asc Awards: Cinematographers Guild Sets Robert Richardson & Jeff Jur For Career Honors

  • Deadline
The American Society of Cinematographers said today that Robert Richardson will receive its Asc Lifetime Achievement Award and Jeff Jur is set for the Career Achievement in Television Award. They will pick up their prizes February 9 during the 33rd Asc Awards at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland.

Asc also noted that it also will marks the guild’s 100 anniversary during the 2019 trophy show.

In a career spanning nearly four decades and counting. Richardson has won three Cinematography Oscars — for Hugo (2012), The Aviator (2005), and JFK (1992) — and been nominated six other times for The Hateful Eight, Django Unchained, Inglourious Basterds, Snow Falling on Cedars, Born on the Fourth of July and Platoon. His most recent film is A Private War, in is in theaters, and his latest of several Quentin Tarantino films, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, is slated for release next year.

Jur has a pair of Emmy
See full article at Deadline »

Join Us: Special panel with cinematographers of ‘Black Panther,’ ‘Never Look Away,’ ‘A Private War,’ ‘A Quiet Place’

Join Us: Special panel with cinematographers of ‘Black Panther,’ ‘Never Look Away,’ ‘A Private War,’ ‘A Quiet Place’
Don’t miss our upcoming special Q&A panel as Gold Derby welcomes four of the top cinematographers in the world on November 29. Join us at the Landmark Theater on Pico Blvd. in Los Angeles for the event at 7:00 Pt. It’s free to anyone who wants to attend, but top priority in getting one of the limited seats is to be a guild member or Oscar voter.

Click the following link to register: https://meettheexpertscinematography.splashthat.com

Our senior editor Joyce Eng will moderate the Q&A with the following contenders for 2019 awards consideration:

Charlotte Bruus Christensen represents Paramount for “A Quiet Place

Christensen is also known for her work on such films as “The Girl on the Train,” “Fences” and “Molly’s Game.”

Caleb Deschanel represents Sony Pictures Classics for “Never Look Away

Deschanel is a five-time Oscar nominee for “The Right Stuff” (1983), “The Natural” (1984), “Fly Away Home
See full article at Gold Derby »

Cinematographer Robert Richardson on ‘A Private War’, the Loss of FilmStruck, ‘The Aviator’ and More

Robert Richardson is one of the greatest cinematographers who’s ever lived, full-stop. His versatility is matched only by his specificity, and it’s no surprise that he’s struck up a number of fruitful collaborations with some of cinema’s best filmmakers throughout the course of his career. Richardson initially honed his craft with director Oliver Stone on films like Salvador, Platoon, and JFK, then he struck up a tremendous relationship with Martin Scorsese that ranged from Casino to The Aviator, with the latter earning Richardson the Oscar for Best Cinematography. When Quentin Tarantino set out to craft …
See full article at Collider.com »

Kevin Bacon: ‘Who would play me in the film of my life? Harry Styles’

The actor on being the youngest of six by eight years and how he met his wife, Kyra Sedgwick

Born in Pennsylvania, Kevin Bacon, 60, found global fame in 1984, when he played the lead in Footloose. His subsequent work includes the films JFK, A Few Good Men, Apollo 13, and Mystic River. Since 2012, he has starred in ads for Ee mobile. He is married to the actor Kyra Sedgwick, has two children and lives in New York.

What is your greatest fear?

What we’re doing to the planet.

Related: Emilia Fox: ‘What do I most dislike about my appearance? That it's scrutinised'
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Climax Films Sees No ‘Ordinary’ Future for Europe (Exclusive)

  • Variety
A complex spy thriller set in the near future imagines Europe on the brink, manipulated by a shadowy organization bent on destroying democracy across the continent.

With far-right political parties making strides across Europe, it’s an all-too-plausible scenario portrayed in “An Ordinary Citizen,” a 10 x 52’ series from Belgium’s Climax Films that has been selected for Mia’s drama series pitching competition.

Set on the eve of the campaign to elect the first President of the newly formed United States of Europe, the series follows an ordinary family man who becomes a fugitive when his daughter disappears, and he’s accused of killing his wife. Hunted by the secret service, he gradually realizes he’s a pawn in a much larger game that could ultimately tear Europe apart.

“An Ordinary Citizen” arrives at a pivotal moment in European history. “It looks like our democratic societies have lost their goal and direction,
See full article at Variety »

Walter Matthau movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Fortune Cookie,’ ‘The Odd Couple’

  • Gold Derby
Walter Matthau movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Fortune Cookie,’ ‘The Odd Couple’
Walter Matthau would’ve celebrated his 98th birthday on October 1, 2018. Born in 1920, the actor was a celebrated performer on both the stage and screen, known for his gruff, rumpled persona. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Matthau turned to acting after serving in the United States Army Air Force during WWII. He became a frequent presence on the small screen with appearances in “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Goodyear Playhouse,” and “The Du Pont Show of the Week” (which brought him an Emmy bid in 1963), to name a few. During this period he also appeared in several films, few of them comedies, including “A Face in the Crowd” (1957) and “Fail Safe” (1964).

At the same time, he gained increasing respect as a stage actor with Tony Award-winning performances in “A Shot in the Dark” (Featured Actor in a Play
See full article at Gold Derby »

Walter Matthau movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Walter Matthau movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Walter Matthau would’ve celebrated his 98th birthday on October 1, 2018. Born in 1920, the actor was a celebrated performer on both the stage and screen, known for his gruff, rumpled persona. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Matthau turned to acting after serving in the United States Army Air Force during WWII. He became a frequent presence on the small screen with appearances in “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Goodyear Playhouse,” and “The Du Pont Show of the Week” (which brought him an Emmy bid in 1963), to name a few. During this period he also appeared in several films, few of them comedies, including “A Face in the Crowd” (1957) and “Fail Safe” (1964).

At the same time, he gained increasing respect as a stage actor with Tony Award-winning performances in “A Shot in the Dark” (Featured Actor in a Play
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sissy Spacek movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter,’ ‘Carrie,’ ‘In the Bedroom’

  • Gold Derby
Sissy Spacek movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Coal Miner’s Daughter,’ ‘Carrie,’ ‘In the Bedroom’
Sissy Spacek has been one of America’s top actresses for nearly 45 years. Throughout her career she has received six Oscar nominations for Best Actress, seven Golden Globe bids and three Emmy nominations. The New York Film Critics Circle has been so enamored of her work that they have recognized her four times, placing her second behind only Meryl Streep as the organization’s most acclaimed actresses. Early bird Oscar pundits are already speculating that Spacek could be back at the Oscars as a possible Best Supporting Actress nominee next year for her work in “The Old Man and the Gun,” which is being touted as Robert Redford’s final acting performance.

In addition to that, Spacek just returned to her Stephen King roots appearing in Hulu’s new drama series “Castle Rock.” It was in the film version of King’s first novel, “Carrie,” which first brought Spacek international
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Adrift’: How Twin Brothers Wrote Shailene Woodley a Harrowing Romantic Epic

‘Adrift’: How Twin Brothers Wrote Shailene Woodley a Harrowing Romantic Epic
In “Adrift,” young sailors in love with world travel and each other (Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin) agree to pilot a yacht across the South Pacific for $10,000. They fancy 30 days of watching sunsets. What they get is a Category 5 hurricane.

Tami Oldham Ashcraft recounted the real-life ordeal she and fiancé Richard Sharp endured in Fall 1983 in “Red Sky at Mourning: A True Story of Love, Loss, and Survival at Sea.” The self-published memoir was found by identical twin screenwriters Aaron and Jordan Kandell. They abandoned plans for an original maritime tale, wanting instead to adapt Ashcraft’s text, and envisioning their friend Woodley as its indefatigable heroine.

Read More: ‘Adrift’ Review: Shailene Woodley Rescues a True Life Survival Thriller from Drowning at Sea

When Woodley was 18 and filming Alexander Payne’s “The Descendants” in the brothers’ native Hawaii, Jordan’s wife was the teacher hired by the studio to help
See full article at Indiewire »

Arthur Manson Dies: Longtime Film Marketing & Distribution Exec Was 90

Arthur Manson Dies: Longtime Film Marketing & Distribution Exec Was 90
Arthur Manson, a film executive whose career in marketing and distribution included numerous Oscar-winning films and ran from Hollywood’s Golden Age until his retirement last year, died peacefully Monday at his home in Riverdale, NY, his daughter Cynthia Manson said. He was 90.

Born in Brooklyn in 1928, Manson served in the Army immediately after World War II in Allied-occupied Germany, where he was a reporter for Stars and Stripes. He followed his brother Alan into the entertainment business as advance agent for Laurence Olivier’s legendary 1940s version of Henry V.

In a career that spanned nearly 70 years, Manson worked for and with such Hollywood’s studios as Warner Bros, MGM, 20th Century Fox, Columbia Pictures, Dino De Laurentiis, Samuel Goldwyn Productions and Stanley Kramer Productions and was responsible for the worldwide rollout of Stanley Warner’s ultrawide-screen Cinerama films.

He worked on the marketing and distribution of three Best
See full article at Deadline »

‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ Will Be Shot by Oscar-Winning Cinematographer Robert Richardson

‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ Will Be Shot by Oscar-Winning Cinematographer Robert Richardson
Quentin Tarantino’s highly anticipated (and already controversial) next film will see him teaming up with collaborators new and old, from Margot Robbie and Burt Reynolds to Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio. A source close to production has confirmed to IndieWire that one of his most important behind-the-camera collaborators is returning as well: cinematographer Robert Richardson.

Richardson has shot each of Tarantino’s last four movies, receiving Oscar nominations for “Inglourious Basterds,” “Django Unchained,” and “The Hateful Eight”; he’s won the award as many times, for “JFK,” “The Aviator,” and “Hugo.” Set in 1969, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” stars DiCaprio and Pitt as an aging actor and stuntman, respectively, who try to make their way back into the film industry — and the actor’s neighbor just happens to be Sharon Tate (Robbie). It’s been referred to as Tarantino’s Charles Manson movie, though he himself has said
See full article at Indiewire »

Natural Born Killers, The Virgin Suicides and More: Jim Hemphill’s Weekend Viewing Recommendations

From 1986, the year in which he made two flat-out masterpieces (Salvador and Platoon) to 1995, when he directed his boldest and richest film to that point (Nixon), Oliver Stone was on a streak like no other filmmaker has ever had before or since. Ten films in ten years, many of them enormous epics and all of them ambitious attempts to assess where America had been, where it was, and where it was going. The scale and depth of Stone’s work during this period is equaled by the diversity of tone, […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »
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