7.1/10
5,501
44 user 42 critic

Homicide (1991)

Trailer
0:48 | Trailer

On Disc

at Amazon

A Jewish homicide detective investigates a seemingly minor murder and falls in with a Zionist group as a result.

Director:

David Mamet

Writer:

David Mamet
3 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Crime | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A psychiatrist comes to the aid of a compulsive gambler and is led by a smooth-talking grifter into the shadowy but compelling world of stings, scams, and con men.

Director: David Mamet
Stars: Lindsay Crouse, Joe Mantegna, Mike Nussbaum
Things Change (1988)
Comedy | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Shoe-shiner Gino is hired to take the rap for a mafia murder. Two-bit gangster Jerry watches over Gino and gives him a weekend to remember.

Director: David Mamet
Stars: Don Ameche, Joe Mantegna, Robert Prosky
Drama | Mystery | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

An employee of a corporation with a lucrative secret process is tempted to betray it. But there's more to it than that.

Director: David Mamet
Stars: Steve Martin, Ben Gazzara, Campbell Scott
Oleanna (1994)
Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

When a student visits her professor to discuss how she failed his course, the discussion takes an awkward turn.

Director: David Mamet
Stars: William H. Macy, Debra Eisenstadt, Diego Pineda
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

A movie crew invades a small town whose residents are all too ready to give up their values for showbiz glitz.

Director: David Mamet
Stars: Philip Seymour Hoffman, William H. Macy, Rebecca Pidgeon
Spartan (2004)
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

The investigation into a kidnapping of the daughter of a high-ranking US government official.

Director: David Mamet
Stars: Val Kilmer, Derek Luke, William H. Macy
Redbelt (2008)
Drama | Sport
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

A fateful event leads to a job in the film business for top mixed-martial arts instructor Mike Terry. Though he refuses to participate in prize bouts, circumstances conspire to force him to consider entering such a competition.

Director: David Mamet
Stars: Chiwetel Ejiofor, Tim Allen, Emily Mortimer
Heist (2001)
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

A career jewel thief finds himself at tense odds with his longtime partner, a crime boss who sends his nephew to keep watch.

Director: David Mamet
Stars: Gene Hackman, Rebecca Pidgeon, Danny DeVito
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Following the theft of a postal-order, a fourteen-year old cadet is expelled from Naval College. To save the honour of the boy and his family, the pre-eminent barrister of the day is engaged to take on the might the Admiralty.

Director: David Mamet
Stars: Rebecca Pidgeon, Jeremy Northam, Nigel Hawthorne
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

Long-repressed feelings of bitterness and betrayal explode when three inner-city losers plot the robbery of a valuable coin in a seedy second-hand junk shop.

Director: Michael Corrente
Stars: Dustin Hoffman, Dennis Franz, Sean Nelson
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Joe Mantegna ... Bobby Gold
William H. Macy ... Tim Sullivan
Vincent Guastaferro ... Lt. Senna
J.J. Johnston ... Jilly Curran
Jack Wallace ... Frank
Lionel Mark Smith Lionel Mark Smith ... Charlie Olcott
Roberta Custer Roberta Custer ... Cathy Bates
Charles Stransky ... Doug Brown
Bernard Gray Bernard Gray ... James
Paul Butler Paul Butler ... Commissioner Walker
Colin Stinton ... Walter B. Wells
Louis Murray Louis Murray ... Mr. Patterson
Christopher Kaldor Christopher Kaldor ... Desk Sergeant
Linda Kimbrough Linda Kimbrough ... Sgt. Green
Robin Spielberg Robin Spielberg ... Records Officer
Edit

Storyline

Policeman Bob Gold has to capture a murderer that not even the FBI has been able to find. But before he can even start he is re-assigned to the murder of an old Jewish lady in a black area. The evidence points at a Jewish hate group and he discovers connections between them and his previous case. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Bob Gold is a cop. A good cop. But tonight, he will betray his friends. See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 August 1991 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

A gyilkossági csoport See more »

Filming Locations:

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Edit

Box Office

Gross USA:

$2,971,661
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby (Stereo)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Third theatrical feature film written and directed by director-playwright David Mamet. See more »

Goofs

Toward the end of the film, when two policemen take Randolph away from Bob Gold, Bob's right arm is hanging. In the next shot, Bob's right arm is stretched. See more »

Quotes

Tim Sullivan: Hey, you got some... you got some heavy troubles on your mind? Huh, babe? We'll work it out. We'll play some cops and robbers. We'll bust this big criminal. We'll swagger around.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Magnolia (1999) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Mamet dialogue too stylized, similar
19 May 2001 | by vaneyckSee all my reviews

I found the film as riveting and disturbing as most of the other reviewers, but I'd like to comment here on David Mamet's writing style. As one of the earlier reviews points out, Mamet is much admired by the literati, and as another says, he is studied in film schools. So I may be going out on a limb, but I am a lot less impressed with his writing than most.

David Mamet started as a playwright, and he still writes with the theater in mind, even when he writes for movies or TV. I first noticed this a year or so ago when watching a rerun of Hill Street Blues for which he'd written the script. The show had many first-rate TV writers, and there was nothing incongruous in the idea that a celebrated playwright would write an episode. But his episode, while intense, involving, and philosophical in the approved Mamet style, proved out of place as an episode in a long-running series with established characters. Mamet's Hill Street bunch lost familiar character traits and gained others common to nearly all the dramatis personae of his plays. The cops all talked like Mamet characters, had macho-philosophical Mamet dialogues, faced Mamet moments of truth.

Well, here is Homicide, another cop show in full length movie form, and once again his puppets talk like Mamet characters, rather than like distinguishable individuals. These roles are his own creations, so he isn't confronted with a series-watcher's expectations, but that hasn't made them more believable as people. His dialogue has a sameness about it that suggests he doesn't really listen to the way people talk. (Again, I realize this is a minority view: critics are always writing about the "gritty realism" of his characters' speeches.)

Listen to the dialogue from one of the NYPD Blue episodes written by David Milch. (I choose Milch not only because he's one of Blue's best writers [and co-producer, of course] but also because he wrote many of the best Hill Street Blues episodes around the time Mamet wrote his contribution.) The characters are varied, and their choice of words tells the listener more about them as individuals with every line they speak. Mamet characters tend to tell you, not what they are like as people, but what Mamet wants you to think about them. Again and again during Homicide I found myself thinking: "no, he wouldn't say that", or even "does anybody really talk that way?"

Am I saying David Milch is a better writer than David Mamet? I think I am, for realistic media like TV and film, anyway. The theater, as an inherently artifical medium, can absorb and even thrive upon artificiality in its dialogue. But TV and movies have different demands, and I don't think David Mamet meets them very well.


4 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 44 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending Movies With Prime Video

Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed