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Whoopi Goldberg (‘Ghost’) doesn’t need a psychic to know she’s top Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1990s [Poll Results]

Whoopi Goldberg (‘Ghost’) doesn’t need a psychic to know she’s top Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1990s [Poll Results]
Whoopi Goldberg, you ain’t in danger, girl, of not being the top Best Supporting Actress winner of the 1990s! Goldberg won Gold Derby’s recent poll asking you to vote for your favorite Best Supporting Actress winner of the ’90s, and her scene-stealing performance as psychic Oda Mae Brown in “Ghost” was your clear choice.

Goldberg won with 27% of the vote, a healthy lead over runner-up Angelina Jolie for “Girl, Interrupted” at 18%. Marisa Tomei (“My Cousin Vinny”) wasn’t too far behind at 15%. From there it was a relatively significant drop-off, with Kim Basinger (“L.A. Confidential”), Anna Paquin (“The Piano”) and Dianne Wiest (“Bullets over Broadway”) each netting 8% of the vote. Judi Dench (“Shakespeare in Love”) was next at 7%, followed closely by Juliette Binoche (“The English Patient”) at 6%. The lowest vote-getters included Mercedes Ruehl (“The Fisher King”) with 2% and Mira Sorvino (“Mighty Aphrodite”) in last at 1%.

SEE2018 Oscars Dream
See full article at Gold Derby »

Robin Williams (‘Good Will Hunting’) voted top Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s for profound performance [Poll Results]

Robin Williams (‘Good Will Hunting’) voted top Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s for profound performance [Poll Results]
Robin Williams has been voted your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s for his profound performance as psychologist Sean Maguire in “Good Will Hunting.” The late actor handily won Gold Derby’s recent poll asking you to vote for your top Supporting Actor of the decade.

Williams won with an impressive 38% of the vote, with Joe Pesci (“Goodfellas”) coming in second at 23%. The only other performances to gain double-digit percentage points were Kevin Spacey (“The Usual Suspects”) with 11% and Martin Landau (“Ed Wood”) at 10%. Gene Hackman (“Unforgiven”) rounded out the top five with 6% of the vote. From there we had Cuba Gooding Jr. (“Jerry Maguire”) at 5%, Tommy Lee Jones (“The Fugitive”) at 4%, Michael Caine (“The Cider House Rules”) at 2% and James Coburn (“Affliction”) at 1%. Jack Palance (“City Slickers”) was the only actor to not earn a single percentage point.

SEESam Rockwell (‘Three Billboards’) would be sixth Best
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the 1990s went to many long overdue veterans of the industry. Actors like James Coburn, Jack Palance and Martin Landau finally earned Oscars in this decade, alongside then-newer stars like Cuba Gooding Jr and Kevin Spacey. What is your favorite Best Supporting Actor performance of the 1990s?

Read through a recap of their performances and vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actor.)

Joe Pesci, “Goodfellas” (1990) — Joe Pesci won his Oscar with the most iconic role of his career. In “Goodfellas” Pesci plays Tommy DeVito, a blustering gangster who provides some of the funniest lines in the film. Pesci was previously nominated in Best Supporting Actor for “Raging Bull” (1980).

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1990s: Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Jonathan Demme … ? [Poll]

Jack Palance, “City Slickers” (1991) — Jack Palance finally won his Oscar thanks to “City Slickers,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1990s: Whoopi Goldberg, Angelina Jolie, Judi Dench … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1990s: Whoopi Goldberg, Angelina Jolie, Judi Dench … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actress went to a wide swath of talented actresses in the 1990s, including Whoopi Goldberg, Marisa Tomei, Anna Paquin, Judi Dench and Angelina Jolie. A surprising amount of comedic performances won this category in the ’90s, especially for an academy that typically prefers drama. Which Best Supporting Actress winner is your favorite?

Check back on all the former champs and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actress.)

Whoopi Goldberg, “Ghost” (1990) — Whoopi Goldberg became the second black actress to win an Oscar thanks to her scene-stealing role as scheming psychic Oda Mae Brown in “Ghost.” She was previously nominated in Best Actress for “The Color Purple” (1985). Goldberg is one of only 12 individuals to have won the Egot, a.k.a. the Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Culture Dump #23: 4 Actors who won Oscars for Roles that Weren’t their Best

2018’s Oscar nominations arrived earlier this week, offering a hopeful change of pace to shake up what most of us have come to expect from Academy voters. While an Oscar statuette is considered the highest praise an actor can receive, they’re not always awarded for the best performance on a star’s resume. Let’s take a look…

Gary Oldman

Let’s not bury the lead here – 2018 is shaping up to be Gary Oldman’s year, with the screen-vet and twice Academy nominated star looking likely to take home an Oscar for his immersive turn as UK Prime Minister and friendliest person you’re ever (not) likely to see on the tube, Winston Churchill. If he does win big, it’ll be no big surprise. Oldman’s made going to the cinema worthwhile for the better part of twenty-five years and while his take on Churchill is impressive, it
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Blu-ray Review – The Voice of the Moon (1990)

The Voice of the Moon (La Voce Della Luna, 1990)

Directed by Federico Fellini

Starring Roberto Benigni, Paolo Villaggio, Nadia Ottaviani, Marisa Tomasi, Angelo Orlando, Syusy Blady

Synopsis:

A recently released patient from a mental hospital has a series of fantastic adventures amidst a surreal landscape while trying to win the affections of his love.

Federico Fellini’s last film is a jaw-dropping experience. Bringing together a surreal template of dream logic with wry humour and sardonic swipes at society, The Voice of the Moon – or in Italian, La Voce Della Luna – provides the magical realism and wonder of life that the Italian filmmaker is best known for.

Adapted from Ermanno Cavazzoni’s poetic novel, the story follows the recently released mental patient Ivo Salvini (Roberto Benigni, Life is Beautiful) as he navigates his way around a strange and compelling landscape. He encounters the entrancing Aldina (Nadia Ottaviani) by accident and falls in love immediately.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

A Future of ‘Flatliners’: 5 Bad ’90s Movies That Hollywood Should Remake for Millennials

  • Indiewire
A Future of ‘Flatliners’: 5 Bad ’90s Movies That Hollywood Should Remake for Millennials
This Friday will see the release of a horror film called “Flatliners,” a movie title that should be instantly familiar to anyone who spent the ’90s trawling the shelves of their local video store in search of something — anything — to watch that weekend. Perhaps best remembered as the crusty VHS that was always sandwiched between “The Fisher King” and “Fried Green Tomatoes,” the original “Flatliners” was an asinine but atmospheric psychological horror thing that starred Kiefer Sutherland, Julia Roberts, Kevin Bacon, Oliver Platt, and Billy Baldwin as foolhardy med students who start experimenting with life after death. Nothing goes wrong and they all live happily ever after.

Now, perhaps motivated by the fact that the mere act of making a movie in 2017 feels like an experiment with life after death, Hollywood is about to unleash a remake starring Ellen Page, Diego Luna, Nina Dobrev, James Norton, and Kiersey Clemons. Directed by Niels Arden Oplev,
See full article at Indiewire »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

  • Indiewire
Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Indiewire »

Tiff Audience Award goes to “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Yesterday afternoon, the Toronto International Film Festival announced their award winners. Notably, the Audience Award, which is the top prize at Tiff, went to Martin McDonagh’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. The runner ups were, perhaps surprisingly, Craig Gillespie’s I, Tonya, as well as Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name. The win for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri was slightly surprising, though the word out of Toronto has been incredibly positive. After taking a prize recently at the Venice Film Festival for Screenplay, it’s currently the most awarded contender of the year so far. If nothing else, that’s a nice head start for a movie such as this one. Looking specifically at the Audience Award and thinking in terms of its history, this is a somewhat reliable indicator of prestige. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri now joins a group that has five prior Best Picture winners,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

'The Defenders': How Marvel's Netflix Heroes Assemble for the First Time

[Warning: This story contains spoilers through the first four episodes of Marvel's The Defenders.]

When it comes to Marvel's The Defenders, it all starts with The Fisher King.

No, that's not the name of a Marvel supervillain, though it certainly sounds like one. Instead, it's the 1991 Terry Gilliam film about a disgraced shock jock and a homeless man who find friendship and redemption in one another. The film features a memorable scene set inside a Chinese restaurant, impactful for many reasons — but for the purposes of Marvel's Netflix initiative, impactful in that it's what...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

The Top Five Mercedes Ruehl Movie Roles of Her Career

Mercedes Ruehl is a familiar face in the acting business. The American actress was born in Queens New York in 1948. Although she is predominantly a stage actress, she’s also built a fan base for her roles in television and movies. Her versatility allows her to move from one venue to another seamlessly, amassing a following wherever she performs. Here are the top five movie roles that she has played so far in her career. 1. Anne in “The Fisher KingMercedes Ruehl played the part of Jeff Bridges’ girlfriend in the 1991 film “The Fisher King.” This was the

The Top Five Mercedes Ruehl Movie Roles of Her Career
See full article at TVovermind.com »

‘The Big Sick’: How Kumail Nanjiani, Emily V. Gordon Brought Their Real-Life Love Story to Screen

‘The Big Sick’: How Kumail Nanjiani, Emily V. Gordon Brought Their Real-Life Love Story to Screen
July 14 marks a special occasion for Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon. Not only is it their 10-year wedding anniversary — it’s the day the film about their courtship, “The Big Sick,” opens nationwide.

The movie, directed by Michael Showalter and starring Nanjiani, Zoe Kazan as Emily and Holly Hunter and Ray Romano as her parents, premiered to rave reviews at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Written by Nanjiani and Gordon, the film also sparked a bidding war, with Amazon Studios acquiring the rights for $12 million. “The Big Sick” manages to be both broad in its comedy (Judd Apatow is one of the producers) and intensely personal, tackling topics not usually seen in summer comedies, like illness, religion and race relations. And, of course, it’s a passion project for the couple, whose real-life story lent itself to good cinematic material.

In many ways, their anniversary shouldn’t be happening. For starters, Nanjiani had promised his parents he would enter into an arranged marriage with a Pakistani woman. Then, three months before what would prove to be Nanjiani and Gordon’s wedding date, Gordon was placed in a medically induced coma after abruptly falling gravely ill.

Prior to the coma, Nanjiani and Gordon were casually dating, both thinking the relationship could ultimately go nowhere. Everything changed when she became sick and Nanjiani found himself thrust into the role of caretaker, along with her visiting parents, whom he had only briefly met once before. Time by her bedside changed the nature of the relationship between Gordon and Nanjiani, who proposed shortly after she recovered. Or, as Gordon jokes, “I went to sleep with a casual boyfriend and woke up with a guy ready to be married.”

When the pair wed a decade ago, it was an informal event.

“We walked into a courthouse in Chicago and got matching tattoos because we didn’t have money for wedding rings,” Nanjiani reveals. Today, they share a home in the Hollywood area with their cat, Bagel. Nanjiani is best known for his role as computer programmer Dinesh on HBO’s heralded series “Silicon Valley.” Gordon, who was a therapist when they met, has been published in The New York Times and The Atlantic and has written for “Another Period” and “The Carmichael Show.”

Jose Mandojana for Variety

The process of scripting “The Big Sick” began in 2012, after Nanjiani appeared on a live taping of the podcast “You Made It Weird” alongside Apatow.

He pitched Apatow several ideas for a script, and the producer homed in on the true story of the unusual relationship between the then struggling stand-up comic and his wife. “It was one of those stories you can’t believe happened,” Apatow recalls.

Though Gordon had executive produced Nanjiani’s show “The Meltdown With Jonah and Kumail” and they’d shared a podcast, the pair had never worked together as writers. “We would split up scenes and write our own version of the scene and then swap it and rewrite and rewrite,” Gordon says. Nanjiani adds that his wife’s work ethic helped spur him on. “I’d be playing video games and would get an email from her with completed scenes and go, ‘Oh man, she’s showing me up. I have to get on this.’”

They knew from the start that since the project wasn’t a documentary, certain elements would be invented or changed. “It’s not really exciting when you hang out at the hospital all day,” Nanjiani notes. “You show up in the morning, get coffee, then plan to meet the hematologist at 2 p.m., then the pulmonologist — it’s a lot of waiting and sitting around.” Echoes Gordon, “Nobody wants to see that movie.”

Another significant alteration: In the film, the pair break up before Emily goes into her coma. Notes Gordon, “It’s interesting to be at your casual girlfriend’s side when she gets sick. But it’s even more interesting to be at your recent ex-girlfriend’s side.”

They also took creative license with both sets of parents in the film. Gordon says her mother and father are quite different from the characters played by Hunter and Romano, though they’re thrilled with their doppelgangers. “My family’s favorite movie is ‘Raising Arizona,’ so they could not believe it,” Gordon says with a laugh. “They love the movie — they watched it five times in one day.” And while Nanjiani’s parents did expect him to enter into an arranged marriage, they were living in a different city when he gave them the (still difficult) news.

The pair took pains to present such cultural practices in a fair light. “For a lot of people, arranged marriage here is taken as a joke,” notes Nanjiani. “But it’s a very real thing. All my aunts, uncles, cousins, my parents are in arranged marriages. So we tried to show how it really does work for people.” Gordon adds that before she met Nanjiani, she had a friend in grad school who was entering into an arranged marriage. “I was glad I had a framework of someone who was super happy, not coerced into it,” she says. “And they’ve been together 12 years now.”

For three years, Gordon says, she and Nanjiani kept at the script. “We would work on drafts, take them to Judd every few months, and Judd would rip them to shreds. And then we would go back and rewrite. He is brutal in the best way.” Nanjiani adds that Apatow never pressured them to turn in drafts. “I think he develops a few things, and the ball is in your court to keep it going,” he says. “Though right before we started shooting, he did say, ‘You guys really stuck in there. Most people would have quit!’”

“We aren’t exactly alike, but we really are so similar. She instantly felt like someone I knew and would be friends with.” Zoe Kazan, on meeting Emily V. Gordon

To hear Apatow tell it, the script needed time to develop, much like his films “Bridesmaids” and “Trainwreck,” which also had long gestation periods. “If written badly, it would have been a rough movie to get through,” Apatow admits. “But they found the sense of humor and the warmth to bring it to life. And a lot of that came from bringing on Michael as director and casting Zoe, Ray and Holly.”

Showalter had known Nanjiani for 10 years from the New York comedy scene, and had even cast him in a small role in his feature “Hello, My Name Is Doris.” When he signed on to direct “The Big Sick,” he was also active in helping with the screenplay, which he notes was not traditionally structured. “There aren’t a lot of examples that I could look to where one of the main characters goes missing for the second act,” Showalter points out. “It would be like if in ‘When Harry Met Sally,’ Sally just disappears for an hour.”

Kazan seems to have been a natural choice for Gordon. The playwright-actress had been in films similar to the genre like “What If” and “Ruby Sparks,” the latter of which she also wrote. “I really wasn’t looking to do another romantic comedy, but when I read the script it was so smart and so good,” Kazan admits. “It’s not unlike falling in love; I had a chemical feeling where it just felt like the right fit. Very rarely do I walk out of an audition thinking, ‘Yeah, I fucking nailed that!’ But I was going to be sad if I didn’t get it.”

To hear everyone tell it, Kazan did indeed nail it. “She just blew everybody out of the water,” says Gordon, who concedes that casting was the only time things felt slightly surreal seeing her story play out. “It basically consisted of him flirting with women — literally so many hot actresses,” Gordon recalls. “It was the only time I had to get myself together and remember to be cool with this.”

As it turns out, Gordon and Kazan have much in common. Both are in their 30s, are writers and are in long-term relationships with artists (Kazan has been dating actor Paul Dano since 2007.) They instantly hit it off, with Kazan noting, “I felt a chemistry with her as much as I did with Kumail.” But Kazan didn’t feel the need to do an imitation of Gordon. “We aren’t exactly alike, but we really are so similar. She instantly felt like someone I knew and would be friends with,” Kazan says.

Once Kazan was cast, the hunt began for the parents, and Romano and Hunter had long been on the writers’ minds. When they said yes, there was extra pressure on Nanjiani as an actor; he had been attached to star even before “Silicon Valley” hit TV screens. Yet there was never any question he would play the role. “This is by far the biggest part I’ve ever had in a movie, and Emily and I had never written a movie, and from the start Judd was like, ‘Yeah, you’ll write the movie and you’ll be the guy,’” Nanjiani recalls. Admits Gordon, “You were a gamble.”

Gordon adds that Nanjiani did the most prep she had ever seen him do. He worked with an acting coach, Myra Turley, for the first time ever. “I was starting from scratch,” he says, adding that he practiced with monologues from movies where characters were in a coma, such as “The Fisher King” and “Awakenings.”

Apatow says he was never concerned. “This might be delusional, but when someone is fun to watch in broader comedy or stand-up, I always think they’ll be able to give a great performance in a movie they care deeply about,” he explains. “And he loves his wife so much, and they’re just the best couple, and I knew that that would shine through.”

Concurs Kazan, “Kumail worked really hard, and I think he’s going to surprise people. He prepared as if he was Daniel Day-Lewis prepping for ‘My Left Foot.’ I even said, ‘I don’t know that you need to prepare this much; you’ve lived it.’ It was really beautiful to watch him on set stretch his wings and feel his own power as an actor.”

Now it remains to be seen if a smaller romantic comedy can find an audience in the land of “Transformers” and superheroes. Nanjiani and Gordon had input on the trailer, which leans heavily on the comedy. “If you describe it as ‘Muslim guy falls in love with a white woman, then she falls into a coma,’ it sounds so serious,” Nanjiani says. Adds Gordon, “It sounds pretentious. As a movie lover, I would not want to watch a movie described to me the way that our movie is. So I wanted to make sure the trailer communicated it’s a comedy.”

Apatow, who has shepherded his share of hits, says that at the end of the day, it’s impossible to predict if the film, which Lionsgate will distribute for Amazon, will connect. “I don’t know if any of us understand why people leave their houses and go to the movie theater anymore,” he says. “We have one thing going for us: The movie is wonderful. It just completely works. Is that enough to get people to put down their remote control? We’ll find out.”

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See full article at Variety - Film News »

Terry Gilliam Defies the Universe, Finishes Filming His ‘Don Quixote’ Movie

Terry Gilliam Defies the Universe, Finishes Filming His ‘Don Quixote’ Movie
Terry Gilliam is one of the most unique talents in the history of cinema…but he is also one of the most unlucky. The director of Brazil, Time Bandits, The Fisher King, and 12 Monkeys may be a visionary director with a few bonafide masterpieces under his belt, but it definitely feels like some kind of higher power has […]

The post Terry Gilliam Defies the Universe, Finishes Filming His ‘Don Quixote’ Movie appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Thrones' Neil Fingleton Dead at 36

Thrones' Neil Fingleton Dead at 36
Game of Thrones actor Neil Fingleton, who played the towering Mag the Mighty on the HBO drama, died Saturday in the UK of heart failure. He was 36.

The 7’7″ Fingleton, who held the title of tallest British-born man in the world, played basketball in college (at both the University of North Carolina and Holy Cross) and professionally before transitioning into acting.

RelatedBig Love Actor Bill Paxton Dead at 61

Additional TV credits included playing The Fisher King on Doctor Who. On the big screen, he appeared in 47 Ronin, Jupiter Ascending, X-Men: First Class and Avengers: Age of Ultron.

Fingleton was featured
See full article at TVLine.com »

Why I Watch The Ref Every Christmas Eve

Why I Watch The Ref Every Christmas Eve
Every family has their tradition when it comes to the holidays. Ever since I was a kid, we would celebrate with my father's side of the family on Christmas Eve, and then with my mother's side on Christmas Day, a tradition that has remained unchanged to this day. There is one tradition that we added on Christmas Eve night, maybe a decade or so ago, after my younger twin brothers and I would come back to my mom's house after spending the day with our father. We would watch the obscure 1994 R-rated Christmas comedy The Ref. Not It's A Wonderful Life or A Christmas Story or A Miracle of 41st Street, but an underrated and underseen comedy starring Denis Leary, post-Remote Control, Kevin Spacey, pre-Oscar win and Judy Davis, post-Oscar nomination. While The Ref may not be as revered as those aforementioned movies, I will always watch The Ref every Christmas Eve,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Jeff Bridges to Be Honored at Santa Barbara Film Festival With Riviera Award

Jeff Bridges to Be Honored at Santa Barbara Film Festival With Riviera Award
The Santa Barbara International Film Festival has selected Jeff Bridges as the recipient of its 2017 American Riviera Award.

Bridges will be honored at a tribute celebrating his career on Feb. 9 at the Arlington Theatre, culminating with his role as a Texas Ranger in “Hell or High Water.” He has received Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award nominations for best supporting actor as well as the National Board of Review Award for best supporting actor.

Bridges received the best actor Academy Award for “Crazy Heart” in 2009 and was nominated for “The Last Picture Show” (1971), “Thunderbolt and Lightfoot” (1974), “Starman” (1984), “The Contender” (2000), and “True Grit” (2010). Other credits include “The Big Lebowski,” “The Fabulous Baker Boys,” “The Fisher King,” “The Morning After,” “Jagged Edge,” “Against All Odds,” and “Seabiscuit.”

Related

Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams to Be Honored by Santa Barbara Film Festival

Jeff Bridges shows us in ‘Hell or High Water’ that an
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Search for Simon review – sci-fi comedy bubbles with nerdy zeal

Martin Gooch’s film about an obsessive search for a lost brother throws out a barrage of whimsy but racks up too little emotion tension

Douglas Adams paperbacks and Time Bandits posters – writer-director Martin Gooch likes to put well-thumbed influences to use as onscreen props. But while his 2013 sci-fi comedy, getting a belated release, bubbles with nerdy zeal, it can’t quite bottle the pathos of Terry Gilliam’s irrepressible dreamers. David Jones, played by Gooch, is a fortysomething kidult using a £60,000 lottery win to fund his obsessive search for the brother he believes, to the exasperation of everyone around him, was abducted by aliens as a child. Fondly teasing UFO conspiracy theorists and tabletop-gaming hobbyists, The Search for Simon’s whimsy barrage is admirably detailed – from a fake BBFC certificate to comedy acronyms (British AeroSpace Technology Advanced Research Development Division). But the film waits too long before permitting us
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Billy Crystal, Whoopi Goldberg and More Remember Robin Williams at SAG-aftra Center Opening

  • Indiewire
Billy Crystal, Whoopi Goldberg and More Remember Robin Williams at SAG-aftra Center Opening
Five of Robin Williams’ friends and colleagues celebrated the opening of the SAG-aftra Foundation’s Robin Williams Center for Entertainment and Media in New York on Wednesday by remembering the life and and work of Williams. In honor of his more than 40-year career that included more than 100 performances in TV and film, the SAG-aftra Foundation dedicated its new 154-seat screening room to the memory and legacy of Williams.

Watch: Bobcat Goldthwait Opens Up About Directing His Best Friend Robin Williams in ‘Larry King Now’ Clip

On hand for the event were Billy Crystal, Whoopi Goldberg, Hank Azaria, Bonnie Hunt and director Barry Levinson, who directed Williams in three films: “Good Morning, Vietnam,” “Toys” and “Man of the Year.” Each member of the panel spoke at length, remembering Williams and sharing insights into his personality. “He was not a sports guy,” Crystal said. “I would ask him who he rooted for,
See full article at Indiewire »

“La La Land” takes the Audience Award at the Toronto Film Festival

Yesterday, the Toronto International Film Festival gave out its awards for 2016, with Damien Chazelle’s La La Land taking the top prize. That distinction, the People’s Choice prize, also known as the Audience Award, puts it into some very strong company (for those wondering, the first runner up was Lion, while the second runner up was Queen Of Katwe). The original musical, which stars Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, has been winning over viewers for a few weeks now, starting out at the Venice Film Festival, continuing at the Telluride Film Festival, and now charming everyone at Toronto. At this point, it was already considered the frontrunner in Best Picture, but now, one can say it with more distinction. Frankly, it’s hard not to consider this the one to beat right now. In terms of this particular award and its history, this is a somewhat reliable indicator of prestige.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »
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