6.4/10
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50 user 14 critic

Dutch (1991)

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2:04 | Trailer

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To get to know his girlfriend's son, a working-class good guy volunteers to pick him up from a prep school, only to learn that her son isn't the nicest kid.

Director:

Peter Faiman

Writer:

John Hughes
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1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ed O'Neill ... Dutch Dooley
Ethan Embry ... Doyle Standish (as Ethan Randall)
JoBeth Williams ... Natalie Standish
Christopher McDonald ... Reed Standish
Ari Meyers ... Brock
Elizabeth Daily ... Hailey (as E.G. Daily)
L. Scott Caldwell ... Homeless Woman
Kathleen Freeman ... Gritzi
Lisa Figus Lisa Figus ... Party Woman
Cedering Fox ... Party Woman
Shelby Leverington ... Party Woman
Kyle Fredericks Kyle Fredericks ... Maid
David James Alexander David James Alexander ... Man #1
Ross Borden Ross Borden ... Man #2
Joe Baker Joe Baker ... Party Butler
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Storyline

Working-class good guy Dutch Dooley is the current boyfriend of a wealthy, snobbish tycoon's ex-wife. Volunteering to drive the woman's son home for Thanksgiving to Chicago from his boarding school in Georgia, little does Dutch expect the picaresque adventures in store for him. When a blunt, down-to-earth construction worker takes to the road with an insufferable twelve-year-old snob (desperately insecure under the surface) who does not approve of him in the least, quite a little must happen before they can reach their destination as friends -- or, for that matter, get home at all. Written by Paul Emmons <pemmons@wcupa.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Can a big kid bring out the child in a little jerk? See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 July 1991 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Driving Me Crazy See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,997,000, 19 July 1991, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$4,603,929
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Released under the title "Driving Me Crazy" in the UK and Australia. See more »

Goofs

When Dutch kicks his leg and falls onto his back, he turns over revealing he has split the crack of his pants. You can see his underwear are white (there's even a light blue car in the back-round to see the difference), then when he moons Doyle at the end of the scene his underwear is light blue. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Party Woman: Pardon my incredulity, Natalie, but I'm very surprised to see you here. Pleasantly so, of course.
Natalie: I'm a little surprised to see myself here, too, Mary Alice. Pleasantly so, of course.
Party Woman: Were you here last year?
Natalie: No, I wasn't invited last year.
Party Woman: Oh, curious. That must have been an accident. Oh, do you know Libby?
Natalie: No, I don't believe I do.
Party Woman: Libby, this is Natalie Standish. Natalie is Reed's... Oh, is it alright to...
Natalie: Say that Reed got me pregnant when I was a barhop at your country club? ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Extra footage of 'Dutch" shooting off fireworks plays behind end credits See more »

Connections

Referenced in Mike & Mike: Episode dated 16 June 2016 (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Tied Up
Written by Boris Blank and Dieter Meier
Performed by Yello
Courtesy of PolyGram Special Products, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
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User Reviews

When you need comedy, you get Ed O'Neill!
22 July 2004 | by vertigo_14See all my reviews

Dutch is fantastic because Ed O'Neill, the star of the movie, is a fantastic comedian, and an underrated one at that (but then again, Hollywood does recycle the same cast over and over, so it's no surprised you never see him in too many major motion pictures). And though Christopher MacDonald, who play's Doyle's father is a real creep, he is a great comedian as well, and you just can't help to laugh whenever this guy is around (uh...that's a good thing).

This is the early part of John Hughes's transition into strictly doing family films. He passed the teenage films (the brat pack series), then films with slightly younger supporting and main casts (Uncle Buck, Curly Sue, Dutch), and then went straight for the youngest-aged family film series (Home Alone, Baby's Day Out, etc). The early part of the John Hughes family film series, which started somewhere around 1989/1990 and continued into the early 90s, are comedies that I still enjoy watching (I haven't cared to watch many of his later movies because Baby's Day Out and Beethoven, etc. just doesn't interest me). They had two great elements: the social commentary (though it tends to be repeated in many of his films/screenplays), and the comedy element.

Disappointed that his father (Christopher MacDonald) is in London (on a supposed "business trip", which translates into a holiday with a woman instead of his son) and won't be spending time with him on Thanskgiving, spoiled-brat Doyle (Ethan Embry) decides that he doesn't want to spend the holiday with his mother, either. They don't get along well, especially considering he is more like a mirror of his incredibly obnoxious father, while his mother (Jo Beth Williams) is a sensitive, kinder woman who just wants to get along with her son. Don't worry, 'Dutch' is on the case!

Dutch (Ed O'Neill) is sort of a bafoon character (as we see from the introduction at the party where he engages in something like a mini version of Peter Sellers in 'The Party'). But, he's a good-natured fellow with a heart of gold. He'd have to be to make a promise to Doyle's mom that he'd bring the boy home for the holidays (Doyle goes to private school).

It proves to be no easy task. Not at all. Since Doyle doesn't want to come home at all, let alone with his mother's goofy boyfriend. Doyle despises Dutch because Doyle comes from major money (Dutch works in construction) and sees himself as a much classier person than Dutch (who can get pretty gross when he wants...if only to annoy Doyle). But, Dutch is going to do whatever it takes (and it takes a lot) not only to keep his promise to Doyle's mother, but to try and get the tense little boy to lighten up and see that the world is not entirely against him. So there, you have the typical elements of Hughest: 1) social commentary via class divisions; and 2) unecessary youth angst.

With a guy like Ed O'Neill, who even offers some great slapstick comedy, you can be sure that you'll be in for a lot of laughs. This guy truly is one underrated actor.


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