A prince cursed to spend his days as a hideous monster sets out to regain his humanity by earning a young woman's love.

Writers:

Linda Woolverton (animation screenplay by), Brenda Chapman (story by) | 9 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
1,416 ( 216)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 30 wins & 32 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Robby Benson ... Beast (voice)
Jesse Corti ... Lefou (voice)
Rex Everhart ... Maurice (voice)
Angela Lansbury ... Mrs. Potts (voice)
Paige O'Hara ... Belle (voice)
Jerry Orbach ... Lumiere (voice)
Bradley Pierce ... Chip (voice) (as Bradley Michael Pierce)
David Ogden Stiers ... Cogsworth / Narrator (voice)
Richard White ... Gaston (voice)
Jo Anne Worley ... Wardrobe (voice)
Mary Kay Bergman ... Bimbette (voice)
Brian Cummings ... Stove (voice)
Alvin Epstein Alvin Epstein ... Bookseller (voice)
Tony Jay ... Monsieur D'Arque (voice)
Alec Murphy Alec Murphy ... Baker (voice)
Edit

Storyline

Having lived a life in selfishness, young Prince Adam is cursed by a mysterious enchantress to having the appearance of a monstrous beast. His only hope is to learn to love a young woman and earn her love in return in order to redeem himself. Ten years later, his chance shows itself when a young maiden named Belle (Paige O'Hara) offers to take her ill father Maurice's (Rex Everhart's) place as his prisoner. With help from the castle's enchanted staff, Belle learns to appreciate her captor and immediately falls in love with him. Back in the village however, unscrupulous hunter Gaston (Richard White) has his own plans for Belle. Written by Blazer346

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The most beautiful love story ever told. See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The line in the opening scene "If he could learn to love another, and earn HER love in return" was in the original movie, but it was later changed to "and earn THEIR love in return." The structure of the genderless singilar "their" had been well established in English, but wasn't in common usage in the 90's and early 2000' s, but has since had a resurgance. See more »

Goofs

Belle borrows books from the bookshop yet the bookshop is more of a library as she didn't appear to buy any books. But being considered the only bookworm in town, the book selection is very large. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: Once upon a time, in a faraway land, a young prince lived in a shining castle. Although he had everything his heart desired, the prince was spoiled, selfish, and unkind. But then, one winter's night, an old beggar woman came to the castle and offered him a single rose in return for shelter from the bitter cold. Repulsed by her haggard appearance, the prince sneered at the gift and turned the old woman away. But she warned him not to be deceived by appearances, for beauty is found ...
See more »

Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits. See more »

Alternate Versions

A different version of the "Work-In-Progress Edition", mentioned above, was released on VHS in a special box set. It features all the scenes from the final movie but doesn't include the alternate version of "Be Our Guest." The tape does include a making-of documentary and a short sequence illustrating step-by-step how the film was animated. This is the "Work-In-Progress Edition" that is available on DVD. See more »


Soundtracks

Something There
(uncredited)
Music by Alan Menken
Lyrics by Howard Ashman
Performed by Paige O'Hara, Robby Benson, Angela Lansbury, Jerry Orbach, and David Ogden Stiers
Produced by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken
Arranged by Alan Menken and Danny Troob
Orchestrated by Danny Troob
See more »

User Reviews

 
One of my all-time favourite movies.
2 January 2003 | by Victor FieldSee all my reviews

The only animated movie to receive a Best Picture Oscar nomination, and it deserved it.

Magic from the opening prologue to the final credit, "Beauty and the Beast" is the last real classic to come from the Disney crew before John Lasseter came along. This was one of the few movies I happily paid to see twice in the cinema, and sitting in a sparsely-populated Friday night audience (I was living in Barbados at the time, and it was hardly the most artistic place on Earth... it was a crying shame that there was hardly anyone there while "Home Alone 2" went through the roof) the second time, the magic remained.

You all know the story, so apart from pointing out the movie's one flaw (the prince's spell had to be broken before he turned 21 or he would remain a beast forever; so if it was cast ten years before the events of the movie, wouldn't that mean he was 11 when the spell was cast...?), let's look at how well the movie works. You have a monster who's more human than the movie's medallion-man villain; you have a heroine who's PC but engaging with it; you have a supporting cast of magic utensils who wisely never upstage the couple at the centre of this love story (and despite the Disney animated trappings, it IS a love story); and you have a captivating story, beautifully told.

The movie's also got wonderful design of its French setting and characters, with the ballroom scene a standout (the tiny but appreciative audience were impressed by the sight of the Beast and Belle in their evening wear - the only time I've ever seen cartoon characters get wolf-whistled in a cinema); and Alan Menken's score is his finest work for the Mouse, with matchless lyrics from the late and much lamented Howard Ashman - how many musicals can you name where ALL the songs are brilliant? But ultimately it's the movie's very real heart that makes it a keeper; the cliche "You'll laugh, you'll cry" is all too true in this case. A lot of movies called 'classic' don't deserve that appellation, but this one does.

I'll be slaughtered by anime fans, but what the hell... one "Beauty and the Beast" is worth a thousand "Akira"s. And "Shrek"s. And, I'm willing to bet, "Treasure Planet"s. This is a truly adult animated feature that's also one for the entire family. Forget "The Silence of the Lambs" - this is the real best picture of 1991.


208 of 235 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 460 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

22 November 1991 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Beauty and the Beast 3-D See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$162,146, 17 November 1991

Gross USA:

$218,967,620

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$424,967,620
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (special edition)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo (original release)| Dolby Digital (special edition)| DTS (special edition)| SDDS (special edition)| Dolby Atmos

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed