A prince cursed to spend his days as a hideous monster sets out to regain his humanity by earning a young woman's love.

Writers:

Linda Woolverton (animation screenplay by), Brenda Chapman (story by) | 9 more credits »
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1,746 ( 50)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 29 wins & 32 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Robby Benson ... Beast (voice)
Jesse Corti ... Lefou (voice)
Rex Everhart ... Maurice (voice)
Angela Lansbury ... Mrs. Potts (voice)
Paige O'Hara ... Belle (voice)
Jerry Orbach ... Lumiere (voice)
Bradley Pierce ... Chip (voice) (as Bradley Michael Pierce)
David Ogden Stiers ... Cogsworth / Narrator (voice)
Richard White ... Gaston (voice)
Jo Anne Worley ... Wardrobe (voice)
Mary Kay Bergman ... Bimbette (voice)
Brian Cummings ... Stove (voice)
Alvin Epstein Alvin Epstein ... Bookseller (voice)
Tony Jay ... Monsieur D'Arque (voice)
Alec Murphy Alec Murphy ... Baker (voice)
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Storyline

Having lived a life in selfishness, young Prince Adam is cursed by a mysterious enchantress to having the appearance of a monstrous beast. His only hope is to learn to love a young woman and earn her love in return in order to redeem himself. Ten years later, his chance shows itself when a young maiden named Belle (Paige O'Hara) offers to take her ill father Maurice's (Rex Everhart's) place as his prisoner. With help from the castle's enchanted staff, Belle learns to appreciate her captor and immediately falls in love with him. Back in the village however, unscrupulous hunter Gaston (Richard White) has his own plans for Belle. Written by Blazer346

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The most beautiful love story ever told. See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Donny Osmond and Patrick Swayze were considered for the role of Gaston. Osmond played Gaston in the stage version of Beauty and the Beast and provided the singing voice for Shang in Mulan (1998). See more »

Goofs

Right before Gaston starts singing "The Mob Song," when he is talking to the villagers, the numbers change from a small number to a large crowd in between shots. Also, they move from far away to up close and all around. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: Once upon a time, in a faraway land, a young prince lived in a shining castle. Although he had everything his heart desired, the prince was spoiled, selfish, and unkind. But then, one winter's night, an old beggar woman came to the castle and offered him a single rose in return for shelter from the bitter cold. Repulsed by her haggard appearance, the prince sneered at the gift and turned the old woman away. But she warned him not to be deceived by appearances, for beauty is found ...
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Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits. See more »

Alternate Versions

In the 2010 Diamond Edition release and current releases, the original 1990 Walt Disney Pictures logo was replaced with the current 2006 Walt Disney Pictures logo and the 2007 Steamboat Willie-inspired Walt Disney Animation Studios logo was added in. These changes were also made in the 3D re-release. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Hollywood's Top Ten: Musicals (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Something There
(uncredited)
Music by Alan Menken
Lyrics by Howard Ashman
Performed by Paige O'Hara, Robby Benson, Angela Lansbury, Jerry Orbach, and David Ogden Stiers
Produced by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken
Arranged by Alan Menken and Danny Troob
Orchestrated by Danny Troob
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User Reviews

 
A Transporting Experience
11 December 2001 | by jhcluesSee all my reviews

Indeed, it's a tale as old as time, with a complex message that is as ageless as it is universal; but beneath all the layers it can be summed up very simply: love one another, and refrain from judging others who `seem' to be `different.' And leave it to Disney to present it in such a way that it can be embraced and understood by young and old alike as they have here, in one of their best animated features ever, `Beauty and the Beast,' directed by Gary Trousdale. When a young Prince fails the test of an enchantress disguised as an old hag, she transforms him into a hideous beast, as he is destined to remain until he opens his heart and learns how to love and be loved in return. And so that he'll know where he stands as time goes by, she gives him an enchanted rose, which will bloom until his twenty-first birthday, and he has only until the last petal falls from the flower to effect the change within himself that will be his salvation.

The beast, however, seems doomed, as he shuts himself away, alone in his castle, taking up a reclusive existence far from everyone and everything. Until, one day, a beautiful young woman named Belle shows up at his doorstep. Belle is searching for her inventor father, Maurice, who disappeared while taking one of his latest inventions to the fair; and his trail leads Belle to the castle of the Beast, where she discovers he is being held prisoner, having run afoul of the Beast by trespassing while lost during the night of his journey. Repulsed by the appearance of the Beast, Belle nevertheless strikes a bargain with him: If he will release her father, she will stay in his place. The Beast agrees, with the stipulation that she must remain with him forever. And as the Beast casts Belle's father from the castle and sends him on his way, Belle's fate seems sealed. The only hope now for either Belle or the Beast lies in the remote possibility that true love may somehow prevail before the last petal of the enchanted rose falls.

With the help of a richly textured screenplay (by Linda Woolverton) that invests the characters with a depth of humanity that is often lacking even in `non' animated films, and an Oscar winning score by Alan Menken, director Trousdale provides some real insights into human nature in this retelling of the familiar story of how true love can change even the darkest and coldest of hearts. There's magic in this film, which holds an enchantment of it's own, and the message is presented ever so subtly and with a sensitivity that draws you in gradually until you are so caught up in the story that you become immersed and totally involved without being consciously aware of it. It's a film that enfolds you and takes you where it will, and you go willingly. A beautifully rendered and realized film that successfully transcends it's genre, it is the first animated feature ever to be recognized and rewarded with an Oscar nomination for Best Movie (quite a feat in itself, as it received the nod over such films as `The Fisher King,' `Fried Green Tomatoes,' `Thelma and Louise' and John Singleton's `Boyz N the Hood' that year).

The talented cast supplying the voices of the characters includes Paige O'Hara (Belle), Robby Benson (The Beast), Richard White (Gaston), Jerry Orbach (Lumiere), David Ogden Stiers (Cogsworth), Angela Lansbury (Mrs. Potts), Bradley Pierce (Chip), Rex Everhart (Maurice), Jesse Corti (LeFou), Hal Smith (Phillipe), Jo Ann Worley (Wardrobe), Brian Cummings (Stove), Alvin Epstein (Bookseller) and Kimmy Robertson (Featherduster). There's a scene in this film that is so entrancing and so emotionally involving that it stands up against the best from any drama ever made: As Angela Lansbury (as Mrs. Potts) sings the Oscar winning title song, Belle begins to perceive the true nature of the man within the Beast; and it's no longer the cold-hearted Prince upon whom the enchantress cast her spell, because he has changed. And as they come together and the Beast takes Belle in his arms, sweeping her in dance across the elegant ballroom floor, it becomes one of those rare cinematic `moments' that are entirely transporting, and it does, indeed, take you away. It's a memorable scene that exemplifies the quality and craftsmanship of this film, as does the scene in which the Beast is at last transformed; that such emotion can be captured and expressed in an animated film is an exemplary accomplishment, and it's all a part of why `Beauty and the Beast' is one of Disney's all time greatest films.

One final note: Stay for the credits to hear Alan Menken and Howard Ashman's title song once again, this time performed by Celine Dion and Peabo Bryson. Hypnotically beautiful, this version has a magic all it's own and makes the perfect ending to an enchanting experience. It's all a part of the magic of the movies. I rate this one 9/10.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

22 November 1991 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Beauty and the Beast 3-D See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$162,146, 17 November 1991

Gross USA:

$218,967,620

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$424,967,620
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (special edition)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo (original release)| Dolby Digital (special edition)| DTS (special edition)| SDDS (special edition)| Dolby Atmos

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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