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British producer, sales agent Robbie Little dies in London

British producer, sales agent Robbie Little dies in London
Fixture of independent film world had been planning to attend Cannes with Mrs Lowry & Son.

Robbie Little, the British producer, co-president of The Little Film Company and stalwart of the independent world, has died unexpectedly in London en route to Cannes.

Little, who served alongside his wife Ellen, was a widely admired, deeply experienced and beloved figure in the film industry. At the time of his death he was working with producer Debbie Gray on the Timothy Spall and Vanessa Redgrave drama Mrs Lowry & Son and The More You Ignore Me, and was planning to continue talks with international buyers on the Croisette.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Perfect Murder spotlights the ‘suicide’ of Adrienne Shelly that was really murder

This week The Perfect Murder examines the apparent suicide of actress and director Adrienne Shelly that turned out to be murder. Shelly had various acting roles in independent movies like The Unbelievable Truth and Trust, before going on to win various post-humous awards for the film Waitress in 2007. She was married to Andy Ostroy and had a daughter with him, who was two at the time of her death. On November 1, 2006, Shelly was found hanging in the West Village apartment she used as an office. She was hanging over the bath with a bed sheet tied around...read more
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Watch This: House Party proved Sundance could score a mainstream hit

One week a month, Watch This offers movie recommendations inspired by the week’s new releases or premieres. This week: With Sundance in full swing, we’re looking back at some of the best directorial debuts that premiered at the festival.

House Party (1990)

House Party premiered at the 1990 Sundance Film Festival, part of a pack of extremely promising debut features that also included Whit Stillman’s Metropolitan, Hal Hartley’s The Unbelievable Truth, and Wendell B. Harris Jr.’s Chameleon Street, which took home the top prize. (Apart from those debuts, the main competition also featured Charles Burnett’s To Sleep With Anger, which belongs in a class of its own.) Perhaps those highlights give an idea of why the 1990s tend to be seen as the festival’s golden decade as a taste-making institution. It commanded media attention, but still seemed to hold on to the idea ...
See full article at The AV Club »

How Murdered Waitress Director Adrienne Shelly's Foundation Helps Women Filmmakers - Including One Who Won an Oscar

  • PEOPLE.com
How Murdered Waitress Director Adrienne Shelly's Foundation Helps Women Filmmakers - Including One Who Won an Oscar
After starring in director Hal Hartley's hits such as The Unbelievable Truth and Trust in the early '90s, Adrienne Shelly became known as the original indie queen and gained a huge fan following. Driven to do even more in the film world, she began writing her own screenplays and directing her own movies, including Waitress, which became a hit 2007 movie and is now a smash musical on Broadway - nominated for four Tony Awards. Even though Shelly was happily married to marketing company owner Andy Ostroy, 56, and had a daughter she adored, Sophie, now 12, the film and the
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

How Murdered Waitress Director Adrienne Shelly's Foundation Helps Women Filmmakers - Including One Who Won an Oscar

  • PEOPLE.com
How Murdered Waitress Director Adrienne Shelly's Foundation Helps Women Filmmakers - Including One Who Won an Oscar
After starring in director Hal Hartley's hits such as The Unbelievable Truth and Trust in the early '90s, Adrienne Shelly became known as the original indie queen and gained a huge fan following. Driven to do even more in the film world, she began writing her own screenplays and directing her own movies, including Waitress, which became a hit 2007 movie and is now a smash musical on Broadway - nominated for four Tony Awards. Even though Shelly was happily married to marketing company owner Andy Ostroy, 56, and had a daughter she adored, Sophie, now 12, the film and the
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Murdered Waitress Actress Adrienne Shelly's Husband on Her Legacy for Daughter, 12: 'She Just Adored That Little Girl So Much'

  • PEOPLE.com
Murdered Waitress Actress Adrienne Shelly's Husband on Her Legacy for Daughter, 12: 'She Just Adored That Little Girl So Much'
Actress and director Adrienne Shelly was pregnant with her daughter, Sophie, when she worked on her hit indie film, Waitress, about an unhappy but talented pie-baking Southern woman trying to get away from an abusive husband. While Shelly, who had starred in such indie hits as Hal Hartley's The Unbelievable Truth, was happily married to marketing company owner Andy Ostroy, she had trepidations about balancing her work with motherhood, which she wove into the script. "The central theme of the film is what Adrienne felt in her own life," Ostroy, 56, tells People. "This story is about a woman who is afraid.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Murdered Waitress Actress Adrienne Shelly's Husband on Her Legacy for Daughter, 12: 'She Just Adored That Little Girl So Much'

  • PEOPLE.com
Murdered Waitress Actress Adrienne Shelly's Husband on Her Legacy for Daughter, 12: 'She Just Adored That Little Girl So Much'
Actress and director Adrienne Shelly was pregnant with her daughter, Sophie, when she worked on her hit indie film, Waitress, about an unhappy but talented pie-baking Southern woman trying to get away from an abusive husband. While Shelly, who had starred in such indie hits as Hal Hartley's The Unbelievable Truth, was happily married to marketing company owner Andy Ostroy, she had trepidations about balancing her work with motherhood, which she wove into the script. "The central theme of the film is what Adrienne felt in her own life," Ostroy, 56, tells People. "This story is about a woman who is afraid.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Film Review: 'Everyone's Going to Die'

  • CineVue
★★☆☆☆ "I feel like I should say something important," says Ray, the melancholic career criminal in the midst of a midlife crisis. This essential emptiness plagues, Everyone's Going to Die, the visually shiny debut film from British collective 'Jones', which first premiered at Edinburgh in 2013 and is now in cinemas. Despite the dramatically apocalyptic promise of the title, not much happens in the kind of oddball day-in-the-life movie Hal Hartley made in the early nineties. The Unbelievable Truth in particular seems to have been an inspiration with its leftfield romance and monosyllabic hero. Melanie (Nora Tschirner) is a German girl who we first meet waking up on a floating mattress in a swimming pool with a Hitler moustache.
See full article at CineVue »

Review: For Those Curious About The End Of The 'Henry Fool' Saga, 'Ned Rifle' Is Worth Making Time For

This is a reprint of our review from the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival. By this point, you're either a Hal Hartley devotee, or you're not. The fiercely independent filmmaker established his unique voice on films like "Trust," "Flirt," and "The Unbelievable Truth," and forged an offbeat indie genre unto himself (though it’s never been in vogue). And for most of his career, Hartley’s stayed far away from the studio system (2001's underrated "No Such Thing" being an exception). In 1997, the filmmaker arguably reached the peak of his critical acclaim with "Henry Fool," walking away from the Cannes Film Festival with a Best Screenplay award. It was perhaps the sharpest, most hilarious representation of the filmmaker's distinctly offbeat aesthetics — his deadpan tone, the arch theatrically heightened mise en scene — and he wasn't done with those characters and that world. Nine years later he returned with the sequel, "Fay...
See full article at The Playlist »

“Just a Normal Guy with Completely Predictable Middle-Class Morality”: Hal Hartley on Ned Rifle

When Hal Hartley arrived on the American filmmaking scene in the late 80s and early 90s, “indie film” wasn’t yet hardened into a niche or a brand. Possibilities seemed endless. Hartley’s debut feature The Unbelievable Truth, starring the late Adrienne Shelly, filtered humor and attitude through an unexpected rigor and formal seriousness. Like other early nineties filmmakers who have remained significant over the subsequent quarter-century (Haynes, Van Sant, Solondz), Hartley’s cinema has balanced a sense of specificity of place – many of Hartley’s films are rooted in the five boroughs, Long Island in particular – with international film culture and […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

“Just a Normal Guy with Completely Predictable Middle-Class Morality”: Hal Hartley on Ned Rifle

When Hal Hartley arrived on the American filmmaking scene in the late 80s and early 90s, “indie film” wasn’t yet hardened into a niche or a brand. Possibilities seemed endless. Hartley’s debut feature The Unbelievable Truth, starring the late Adrienne Shelly, filtered humor and attitude through an unexpected rigor and formal seriousness. Like other early nineties filmmakers who have remained significant over the subsequent quarter-century (Haynes, Van Sant, Solondz), Hartley’s cinema has balanced a sense of specificity of place – many of Hartley’s films are rooted in the five boroughs, Long Island in particular – with international film culture and […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

See This Before You Die: Hal Hartley's 'Trust'

  • Hitfix
See This Before You Die: Hal Hartley's 'Trust'
"Dad, give me five dollars." The opening line of writer/director Hal Hartley's "Trust" is delivered in a monotone by Adrienne Shelly, as she applies purple lipstick and stares blankly into a compact mirror. It's a striking shot that establishes everything you need to know about her character Maria -- a high school dropout and case study in youthful entitlement and vanity. Over a career spanning three decades Hartley has been an amazingly prolific filmmaker, directing a total of 15 features and 18 shorts. Unlike many of his late '80s/early '90s indie contemporaries (Quentin Tarantino, Gus Van Sant, Richard Linklater, et al), he has never catered to mainstream tastes, and his work has been greeted by the public in kind. He is known for creating stylized worlds that feel somehow hermetic and worldly, stilted and soulful, in films ranging from 1992's "Simple Men" to 1997's "Henry Fool," and
See full article at Hitfix »

BBC iPlayer enjoyed its best month on record in January

BBC iPlayer experienced its best month on record in January 2015.

The on-demand service received 343 million requests last month, with TV content seeing record viewership at 264 million.

Mobile and tablet requests accounted for 48% of that figure in January, breaking another record for the platform thanks to a surge in TV and radio customers.

Christmas and New Year specials of EastEnders, Top Gear and Miranda attracted around 2 million customers per episode, while The Voice UK, Silent Witness, Wolf Hall and The Dumping Ground were also popular.

Radio 1's Fearne Cotton Show was the most popular radio show in January, followed closely by the Chris Evans Breakfast Show.

Football coverage, The Now Show, The Unbelievable Truth, and new Radio 4 series War and Peace also fared well.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Tiff Review: Hal Hartley's 'Ned Rifle' Starring Liam Aiken, Aubrey Plaza, Martin Donovan, Parker Posey & More

By this point, you're either a Hal Hartley devotee, or you're not. The fiercely independent filmmaker established his unique voice on films like "Trust," "Flirt," and "The Unbelievable Truth," and forged an offbeat indie genre unto himself (though it’s never been in vogue). And for most of his career, Hartley’s stayed far away from the studio system (2001's underrated "No Such Thing" being an exception). In 1997, the filmmaker arguably reached the peak of his critical acclaim with "Henry Fool," walking away from the Cannes Film Festival with a Best Screenplay award. It was perhaps the sharpest, most hilarious representation of the filmmaker's distinctly offbeat aesthetics—his deadpan tone, the arch theatrically heightened mise en scene—and he wasn't done with those characters and that world. Nine years later he returned with the sequel "Fay Grim," a far less successful effort (though one that's actually underrated). And eight...
See full article at The Playlist »

Daily | Toronto 2014 | Hal Hartley’s Ned Rifle

"You’ve got to give credit to Hal Hartley," begins Jordan Mintzer in the Hollywood Reporter. "After breaking out onto the scene 25 years ago with The Unbelievable Truth, he’s been sticking to his guns ever since, making a dozen features characterized by his trademark deconstructed storytelling, deliberately artificial performances and offbeat deadpan humor…. This is clearly the case with Ned Rifle, the final chapter of a trilogy kicked off in 1997 with Henry Fool and followed by 2006’s Fay Grim, which starred Parker Posey as the titular heroine trying to clean up a mess left by her ex-lover." We've posted the trailer as we gather more reviews. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Toronto 2014 | Hal Hartley’s Ned Rifle

"You’ve got to give credit to Hal Hartley," begins Jordan Mintzer in the Hollywood Reporter. "After breaking out onto the scene 25 years ago with The Unbelievable Truth, he’s been sticking to his guns ever since, making a dozen features characterized by his trademark deconstructed storytelling, deliberately artificial performances and offbeat deadpan humor…. This is clearly the case with Ned Rifle, the final chapter of a trilogy kicked off in 1997 with Henry Fool and followed by 2006’s Fay Grim, which starred Parker Posey as the titular heroine trying to clean up a mess left by her ex-lover." We've posted the trailer as we gather more reviews. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Hal Hartley’s ‘Ned Rifle’ gets a first trailer ahead of its Tiff premiere

The Toronto International Film Festival today announced an early selection of galas and premieres for this September’s instalment. Among the most exciting world premieres is that of Hal Hartley’s Ned Rifle. Hartley’s feature career first kicked off with The Unbelievable Truth debuting at Tiff in 1989, and such great films as Trust, Simple Men and Amateur followed from there.

Funded through Kickstarter, Ned Rifle is the final part of a trilogy inadvertently started with Henry Fool in 1997 and then continued with Fay Grim in 2006. Liam Aiken, who was a child when he appeared in Henry Fool, takes the lead role this time round, with fellow trilogy stars Parker Posey, Thomas Jay Ryan and James Urbaniak all returning. Hartley regulars Martin Donovan, Bill Sage, Karen Sillas and Robert John Burke also appear, while Aubrey Plaza joins the Hartley company in what looks to be a very prominent role.

Ahead
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Watch: What America Means To 21 Playwrights in Hal Hartley's 'My America'

Watch: What America Means To 21 Playwrights in Hal Hartley's 'My America'
Director Hal Hartley ("Simple Men," "The Unbelievable Truth" ) brings us "My America," a film that compiles monologues from 21 playwrights about the collective American identity. Read More: Fandor to Exclusively Stream World Premiere of Hal Hartley's 'My America' The monologues are written by some of America's most renowned playwrights, including Neil Labute, Danny Hoch, Dan Dietz and Marcus Gardley, and are read by actors including Jefferson Mays and Kathleen Chalfant, plus Hartley regular Thomas Jay Ryan. Check out the trailer for the film below, which will be available on Fandor on the Fourth of July. 
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc/Fest award for miners strike film

  • ScreenDaily
Doc/Fest award for miners strike film
Owen Gower’s Still the Enemy Within wins audience award.

The Audience Award winner at the 21st Sheffield Doc/Fest has been named as Still the Enemy Within, directed by Owen Gower and produced by Sinead Kirwan and Mark Lacey.

This documentary looks back to Margaret Thatcher’s battle with the unions and specifically the 1984 miners strike. Told primarily from the retrospective of the mining communities the Doc/Fest screenings received a standing-ovation from Sheffield audiences and delegates.

The world premiere screening at Doc/Fest was one of a number of films at the festival that marked the 30th anniversary of the so-called Battle of Orgreave, which took place on June 18.

The documentary festival, which run June 7-12, has also named further audience winners.

The Short Film audience award was won by Our Curse, directed by Tomasz Sliwinski and produced by Maciej Slesicki. The short doc is a self-portrait of a young couple whose newborn child has been
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Sheffield Showroom to lead Film Hub North

  • ScreenDaily
Sheffield Showroom to lead Film Hub North
Exclusive: The first initiative to come out of Film Hub North is a partnership between Sheffield Doc/Fest and Cineworld aimed at bringing documentaries to multiplex audiences.

The BFI has officially added Film Hub North to its Film Audience Network, an £8.7m lottery funded scheme made up of nine Film Hubs tasked with boosting film audiences across the UK.

Film Hub North, which will cover Yorkshire, Cumbria and the North East of England, will be headed up by Sheffield’s Showroom Workstation (under the management of umbrella company Sheffield Media & Exhibtion Centre).

Previously, the BFI had unveiled eight Film Hubs, together with their Film Hub Lead Organisations, that would comprise the Film Audience Network. However the addition of Film Hub North, according to Ben Roberts, director of the BFI Film Fund, “puts the final, significant piece into place”.

As part of its remit to work with key organisations in the region, the first initiative
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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