Solar Crisis (1990) - News Poster

(1990)

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Is this the worst movie break-in of all time?

Apocalyptic thriller Left Behind stars Nicolas Cage. Its reviews were not kind. And it features perhaps the worst movie break-in ever...

Films are sometimes critically panned not because they're inherently bad, but because of the larger story surrounding them. Consider Battlefield Earth, for example: a terrible movie, sure, but its production history (not to mention its connection to the Church of Scientology) made it an easy target.

Solar Crisis, released in 1990 was an equally awful movie - and with a budget of $55m, just as calamitous, financially - but  it was largely ignored while Battlefield Earth's hideousness was trumpeted from the rooftops.

Which brings us to 2014's Left Behind, a film so universally panned by critics that its Rotten Tomatoes score sits at an abysmal two percent. This places it a mere whisker above such legendarily bad films as Jaws: The Revenge and Mac And Me, and a startling
See full article at Den of Geek »

50 forgotten sci-fi films from the 1990s

We may remember Independence Day, The Matrix, The Phantom Menace. But what about these forgotten 90s sci-fi films? And are any worth seeing?

Think back to the science fiction cinema of the 1990s, and some of the decade's biggest box-office hits will immediately spring to mind: The Phantom Menace, Jurassic Park, Independence Day, Men In Black, Armageddon and Terminator 2 were all in the top 20 most lucrative films of the era.

But what about the sci-fi films of the 1990s that failed to make even close to the same cultural and financial impact of those big hitters? These are the films this list is devoted to - the flops, the straight-to-video releases, the low-budget and critically-derided. We've picked 50 live-action films that fit these criteria, and dug them up to see whether they're still worth watching in the 21st century.

So here's a mix of everything from hidden classics to forgettable dreck,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 2007

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 6 Feb 2014 - 06:08

Our series of lists devoted to underappreciated films brings us to the year 2007, and another 25 overlooked gems...

For some reason, the number three was a common factor in several blockbuster movies of 2007. The third film in the Pirates Of The Caribbean series (At World's End) dominated the box office, Spider-Man 3 marked Sam Raimi's last entry as director in the series, while Mike Myers went for a hat trick of hits with Shrek The Third.

I Am Legend was the third and most financially successful attempt to bring Richard Matheson's classic novel to the big screen, Rush Hour 3 marked Jackie Chan's last action pairing with Chris Tucker, while Zack Snyder's musky sword-swinger 300 was notable for having the number three in the title.

Iffy attempts at numerology aside, 2007 was also a superb for year for movies in general - particularly underappreciated ones,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Richard C. Sarafian, Director Of "Vanishing Point", Dead At Age 83

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the passing of director Richard C. Sarafian, who has passed away at age 83. Sarafian may not be a household name but in the film industry he was held in great regard, especially by maverick younger directors like Quentin Tarantino who emulated his work and style. Crusty, outspoken and often littering his sentences with curses that would make a longshoreman blush, Sarafian was an uncompromising man when it came to his personal visions of how his movies should be constructed. He started off directing episodes of classic TV series including I Spy and Batman and his best known work from the 1960s is the eerie "Living Doll" episode of The Twilight Zone in which Telly Savalas as a cruel stepfather gets his comeuppance at the hands of possessed toy doll. Sarafian graduated into feature films and directed the movie which gained him fame, if not fortune: Vanishing Point,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Richard C Sarafian obituary

Director of the mystical road movie Vanishing Point

Vanishing Point was one of a crop of existential road movies in the early 1970s – the others included Two-Lane Blacktop and Electra Glide in Blue – which quickly gained cult status. Its director, Richard C Sarafian, who has died aged 83, never made another film that struck such a resounding chord with audiences, countercultural or otherwise. No matter: the appeal of Vanishing Point was enduring enough to make him a noted, even influential, figure. Quentin Tarantino thanked Sarafian in the closing credits of his own four-wheeled thriller, Death Proof (2007), and the Scottish band Primal Scream signalled their admiration for Vanishing Point by naming a 1997 album after the movie. "It's always been a favourite of the band," said the singer Bobby Gillespie. "We love the air of paranoia and speed-freak righteousness."

This 1971 film concerns the Vietnam veteran Kowalski (played by Barry Newman after the studio overruled Sarafian's first choice,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Richard C Sarafian obituary

Director of the mystical road movie Vanishing Point

Vanishing Point was one of a crop of existential road movies in the early 1970s – the others included Two-Lane Blacktop and Electra Glide in Blue – which quickly gained cult status. Its director, Richard C Sarafian, who has died aged 83, never made another film that struck such a resounding chord with audiences, countercultural or otherwise. No matter: the appeal of Vanishing Point was enduring enough to make him a noted, even influential, figure. Quentin Tarantino thanked Sarafian in the closing credits of his own four-wheeled thriller, Death Proof (2007), and the Scottish band Primal Scream signalled their admiration for Vanishing Point by naming a 1997 album after the movie. "It's always been a favourite of the band," said the singer Bobby Gillespie. "We love the air of paranoia and speed-freak righteousness."

This 1971 film concerns the Vietnam veteran Kowalski (played by Barry Newman after the studio overruled Sarafian's first choice,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sci-fi cinema’s freakiest vortex moments

A sci-fi movie wouldn’t be the same without a hypnotic journey through time and space. Here’s our celebration of cinema’s finest genre vortexes...

It’s a given that any sci-fi protagonist will, at some point in their adventures, descend into a kind of churning whirlpool in space. The experience is probably an entry requirement in the sci-fi hero private smoking room, if such a thing exists. “What? You haven’t been through a vortex of flashing lights? You haven’t stared at the benighted abyss which lies beyond death? Get out. Get out of sci-fi hero club.”

Science fiction is all about poking at the edges of human experience. And sometimes, about what might happen if we head off into the depths of space. What - or who - might we find? Does space loop back on itself, so your ship effectively appears on the other side
See full article at Den of Geek »

Solar Crisis: unearthing a forgotten moment in 90s sci-fi

It was expensive, and its cast included Jack Palance and Charlton Heston. So what was 1990’s Solar Crisis like, and why did it sink without trace…?

Home Alone. Total Recall. Die Hard 2. Dances With Wolves. If you’re old enough to remember the year 1990, then you may also remember that these movies were among its biggest hits. 1990 was also the year of movies such as Edward Scissorhands, Tremors and Goodfellas – movies that didn’t make it into the top 10 list of successes, but are still fondly remembered and enthusiastically discussed.

By contrast, who remembers Solar Crisis? Hardly anyone is the likely answer. What’s strange about the film’s anonymity is that, although its title generic title suggests a straight-to-video B-movie, it was anything but. In fact, with a budget of around $55 million, it wasn’t all that far behind Die Hard 2 ($70 million) and Total Recall ($65 million), the two most expensive movies released that year.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Horror at the Oscars Part 2: This Time It's Personal

Horror fanatics are still buzzing like chainsaws over the Academy Awards’ genre montage. Anywhere there could be a conversation about it online, there was one. Many were upset over the Twilight ‘tweens’ participation, as if their mere presence sent a message about the state of scary in Hollyweird, USA.

A few seemed happy, though, to just get a glimpse of their beloved Evil Dead and Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 if only for a few seconds. But many called the selections generic and thoughtless, demanding the likes of Demons and TerrorVision instead (well, maybe not TerrorVision; that was just me).

How about Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer? Re-Animator? It’s Alive? Tombs of the Blind Dead? Coffin Joe? No list is perfect, but with a bit more care and a phone call to any one of us, the Oscars could have elevated that section into a real scream. Or maybe they
See full article at Dread Central »

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