6.4/10
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65 user 30 critic

Miami Blues (1990)

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An ex-con's first act of freedom is moving to Miami where he restarts his old criminal ways with even more potency.

Director:

George Armitage

Writers:

Charles Willeford (novel), George Armitage (screenplay)
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Alec Baldwin ... Frederick J. Frenger Jr.
Cecilia Pérez-Cervera Cecilia Pérez-Cervera ... Stewardess
Georgie Cranford Georgie Cranford ... Little Boy at Miami Airprt
Edward Saxon ... Krishna Ravindra at Miami Airport
José Pérez José Pérez ... Pablo
Obba Babatundé ... Blink Willie, Informant
Fred Ward ... Sgt. Hoke Moseley
Jennifer Jason Leigh ... Susie Waggoner
Charles Napier ... Sgt. Bill Henderson
Matt Ingersoll Matt Ingersoll ... Mourning Hare Krishna
Jack G. Spirtos Jack G. Spirtos ... Pickpocket Victim
Raphael Rey Gomez Raphael Rey Gomez ... Pickpocket
Tony Paris ... Pickpocket's Accomplice
Wendy Thorlakson ... Toy Store Cashier
William Taylor Anderson Jr. William Taylor Anderson Jr. ... Crack Dealer
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Storyline

When Fred Frenger gets out of prison, he decides to start over in Miami, Florida, where he starts a violent one-man crime wave. He soon meets up with amiable college student/prostitute Susie Waggoner. Opposing Frenger is Sgt Hoke Moseley, a cop who is getting a bit old for the job, especially since the job of cop in 1980's Miami is getting crazier all the time. Written by Reid Gagle

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Real badge. Real gun. Fake cop.


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 April 1990 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Le flic de Miami See more »

Filming Locations:

Kendall, Florida, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$3,002,997, 22 April 1990, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$9,888,167
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Tristes Tropiques See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A framed photograph of Miami Blues author Charles Willeford can be seen on Hoke Moseley's desk in the police station. See more »

Goofs

When they have to buzz you in through a locked coin shop door, they also have to buzz you out. But Frenger just goes through the door after shooting Pedro and the coin shop owner. No one buzzes him out, and the door would be locked. See more »

Quotes

Susie Waggoner: ...And you save your money... and buy a nice little house, with a white picket fence, and live happily ever after.
Frederick J. Frenger Jr.: Tell you what. Let's go straight to the "happily ever after" part, OK?
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Connections

References The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) See more »

Soundtracks

YOU AGAIN
Performed by The Forester Sisters
Written by Paul Overstreet
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc.
By Arrangement with Warner Special Products
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User Reviews

 
A Random Walk Down Biscayne Blvd.
8 January 2005 | by rmax304823See all my reviews

You know what this reminds me of? Godard's "Breathless," one of the first of the shockingly original Nouvelle Vague flicks of the early 60s. I remember first seeing "Breathless" with some friends in a theater in Ithaca, NY, and emerging arguing about what it meant. I don't mean trying to identify any great load of symbolism or moral lesson it might be towing behind it. I just mean, what happened, and why? As I recall we decided that "Breathless" was an "existential" movie and didn't really need to be specific about what was going on. It was a story about a man making a life choice. You can be or do anything you want, said Sartre, and you can break all the rules -- as long as you're willing to take the consequences.

In "Miami Blues" the Belmondo part is played by Alec Baldwin, a guy fresh out of prison who has chosen a life of wilful disobedience. His girl friend (who really ought not to be in college) is a part-time hooker with aspirations that are utterly bourgeois. Jennifer Jason Lee wants to live with her husband and babies in a house with a white picket fence. Fred Ward, looking grizzled and great, is a homicide detective whom Baldwin clobbers and whose identity he steals.

I don't know why certain things happen. For instance, I have no idea how or why Baldwin manages to dig up Ward's home address, then goes there and beats hell out of him, and winds up stealing his false teeth, handcuffs and other cop accoutrements. What was THAT all about? I'll give one more example. Baldwin is in a convenience store and stumbles on an armed robbery. "I'm the police! Drop that gun and walk out of here!" he shouts -- and threatens the armed robber with a jar of spaghetti sauce.

See, in an existentialist movie like this, the characters don't really need to have motives. They do whatever they feel like doing.

There IS continuity though, even if in its details the movie makes very little sense. The characters are consistent, and there is a rudimentary plot, engaging and amusing without being in any way memorable.

I did enjoy the movie though, even the second time around, or maybe even MORE the second time around, since I'd learned not to expect an abundance of logic in the narrative.

The acting of the three principles is also admirable. Alec Baldwin had just appeared in "The Hunt for Red October," in which he struck me as not much more than a handsome leading man. Here, he's a different character entirely. Watch him as he struts down the street, arms swinging jauntily, grinning through pain, happily throwing off non sequiturs in dramatic situations. ("Do you own a suede coat?" he asks a criminal before murdering him.) Lee is more than childlike. She's positively childish with her overflowing emotions. I loved Fred Ward in this. He's full of quirks and rarely seems to be taking the role seriously. Instead of soaking his precious false teeth in -- what is that stuff, Polydent? -- he soaks them overnight in a glass of left-over booze.

Interesting exercise in style and acting.


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