6.5/10
17,537
59 user 36 critic

The Freshman (1990)

PG | | Comedy, Crime | 27 July 1990 (USA)
Trailer
1:54 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 on Prime Video

ON DISC
An N.Y.C. film school student accepts a job with a local mobster who resembles a famous cinema godfather and who takes the young man under his wing, after demanding total loyalty.

Director:

Andrew Bergman

Writer:

Andrew Bergman
Reviews
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

A psychiatrist must cure a young patient that presents himself as Don Juan, the greatest lover in the world.

Director: Jeremy Leven
Stars: Johnny Depp, Marlon Brando, Faye Dunaway
The Formula (1980)
Crime | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.6/10 X  

The synthetic fuel production formula, invented by the Nazis at the end of World War II, is sought after by some who aim to sell it, and by others who wish to destroy it.

Director: John G. Avildsen
Stars: George C. Scott, Marlon Brando, Marthe Keller
Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Ben du Toit is a schoolteacher who always has considered himself a man of caring and justice, at least on the individual level. When his gardener's son is brutally beaten up by the police ... See full summary »

Director: Euzhan Palcy
Stars: Donald Sutherland, Janet Suzman, Zakes Mokae
Project X (1987)
Comedy | Drama | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.1/10 X  

An Air Force pilot joins a top secret military experiment involving chimps, but begins to suspect there might be something more to the mysterious "Project X".

Director: Jonathan Kaplan
Stars: Matthew Broderick, Helen Hunt, Willie
Biloxi Blues (1988)
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A group of young recruits go through boot camp during the Second World War in Biloxi, Mississippi. From the play by Neil Simon.

Director: Mike Nichols
Stars: Matthew Broderick, Christopher Walken, Matt Mulhern
Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

An ex professor offers Adam $1,000,000 to "get" some plasma from a high tech company's lab. Adam asks his criminal grandpa for help. Can the 2 convince Adam's now honest dad to join?Let us see what happens.

Director: Sidney Lumet
Stars: Sean Connery, Dustin Hoffman, Matthew Broderick
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Marlon Brando ... Carmine Sabatini
Matthew Broderick ... Clark Kellogg
Bruno Kirby ... Victor Ray
Penelope Ann Miller ... Tina Sabatini
Frank Whaley ... Steve Bushak
Jon Polito ... Chuck Greenwald
Paul Benedict ... Arthur Fleeber
Richard Gant ... Lloyd Simpson
Kenneth Welsh ... Dwight Armstrong
Pamela Payton-Wright Pamela Payton-Wright ... Liz Armstrong
BD Wong ... Edward
Maximilian Schell ... Larry London
Bert Parks ... Bert Parks
Tex Konig Tex Konig ... Leo
Leonardo Cimino ... Lorenzo
Edit

Storyline

Clark Kellogg is a young man starting his first year at film school in New York City. After a small time crook steals all his belongings, Clark meets Carmine "Jimmy the Toucan" Sabatini, an "importer" bearing a startling resemblance to a certain cinematic godfather. When Sabatini makes Clark an offer he can't refuse, he finds himself caught up in a caper involving endangered species and fine dining. Written by Scott Renshaw <as.idc@forsythe.stanford.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Taking care of the family pet is a big responsibility... especially when it belongs to The Family! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Crime

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian | German | French

Release Date:

27 July 1990 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Akil hocasi See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$205,876, 22 July 1990, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$21,460,601
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

TriStar Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Ironically, in 1972's "The Godfather", 48 year old Brando had to be covered with heavy make and prosthetics to appear to be in his late 60's. In 1990, Brando was already in his late 60's and now needed only minimum make up to appear to be a godfather in his late 60's. See more »

Goofs

When Carmine Sabatini comes and visits the dorm room, the closet door that Clark closes right before he arrives is seen partially open and completely shut in different shots from different angles. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dwight Armstrong, Clark's Step-father: Over there! Look!
Clark Kellogg: Dwight?
Dwight Armstrong, Clark's Step-father: Shh!
Clark Kellogg: Dwight, don't. Don't, really.
[Dwight fires his rifle]
Hunter: Hey, asshole! What are ya, nuts? You can't see the cap, it's not orange enough for ya?
[Dwight fires again]
Dwight Armstrong, Clark's Step-father: Get out of these woods!
See more »

Crazy Credits

"Mr. Brando's Skating Coach" is credited as "Sandra Bezic." See more »

Connections

References Johnny Belinda (1948) See more »

Soundtracks

NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Written by Jiggs Chase, Melle Mel (as Melvin Glover) & Sylvia Robinson
Performed by Grandmaster Flash
Courtesy of Sugar Hill Records
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Further Viewings
11 June 2004 | by rmax304823See all my reviews

What a wacky plot. Broderick is hired to convey illegally imported endangered species by Brando, playing Carmine ("Jimmy the Toucan") Sabatini, in order to provide million-dollar-a-plate dinners for a bunch of international degenerates who revel in eating forbidden fruit, or in this instance lizards. It's the kind of plot you dream up while sitting around all night half-gassed with a couple of buddies who have a good sense of the absurd.

Broderick is Clark Kellog (whom Sabatini calls "Kent"), a naif just in from Vermont to attend film school at NYU. Sabatini is the "importer" he works for and a ringer for "The Godfather." (The original was almost a self parody.) Those are the principal roles and Broderick handles the role of straight man, being sucked into a Mafia-like existence, competently. Brando is unforgettable. He tried one or two comedies before and they tanked, but he's a winner here, cracking walnuts in his fist, weeping with emotion as he embraces his new employee.

But it's not just the relationship between Clark and Sabatini that's amusing. It's also just about everything in between, including what we see of the film school, where the professor assigns seven hundred dollars worth of his own books as required reading, and is working on a paper that will combine -- what was it? -- Plato, Marx, and semiotics in a deconstruction of "The Godfather", or something equally insane? Maximilian Schell is a much under-rated or unnoticed actor. He consistently turns in riveting performances but has never achieved major stardom. It doesn't matter whether it's drama ("Judgment at Nurenberg"), comedy thrillers ("Topkapi"), or, as in this case, comedy. He never fails to bring something extra to the role. His first entrance here knocks the whole situation askew. Clark has enlisted a fellow student to help him carry this giant lizard (Varanus komodoensis -- they pronounce the specific name wrong) and a bearded sunglassed Schell ambles into the scene during the delivery, fondling a ferret, looks up with a big smile, and says, "Sabatini said one boy.... Here are two!" Clark runs through his explanation while Schell listens politely before replying, "Sabatini said one boy.... Here are two!" He says it a third time before ambling off. That's ALL he says.

I've seen this about three times since I first commented on it and, although this is anything but a "deep" movie, I've continually found things, mostly jokes, that I'd missed earlier. I must give a few examples.

Never before had I noticed some particular details in the scene in which Brando cracks the walnuts. I had just seen him cracking walnuts. More recently I've noticed that in this scene Brando, apparently dead serious, tells Broderick that he wants him to accept the job offer. "I don't want to hear 'no', I want to hear 'yes.'" And that, immediately after these lines, while Broderick is pondering an answer, Brando picks up TWO walnuts, rolls them in his palm, and slowly but noisily CRACKS them.

And another of the many allusions to "The Godfather" finally registered on my interpretive apparatus. As the end credits begin to roll, Broderick and Brando are taking the monitor for a walk through the cornfields in long shot. And we can hear Brando's voice offering Broderick some career assistance. "Y'know, Clark, when you get out to Hollywood, maybe I can help you." "No, please." "It wouldn't take much. Just a few phone calls." "NO!" "I could kick open a few doors for you." The penny finally dropped and I could see Brando arranging to have a lopped-off horse head planted in some producer's bed.

Just a few other points. One is that the score owes something to "The Stunt Man." Another is that Brando seems so perfectly comfortable in this self parody. He seems to be genuinely enjoying himself. His body language is exquisite. He lolls around in his chair, sticks his tongue in his cheek (literally), waves his hands, shrugs, and does everything else flawlessly. Sometimes his whiskery voice gets away from the Don Corleone model. I don't think Vito Corleone would be so indignant when talking about Polaroid and IBM on the phone. "I told you before, Charlie, I don't LIKE it when they go DOWN. Listen. I had another stock broker once and he only called me with bad news. It got very UNPLEASANT, Charlie, y'unnerstand me?"

And anyone who thinks of the later Brando as a bloated hypocrite who has lost whatever acting chops he once had should take another look at the scene in which he visits Broderick in the college dorm room. Broderick, at Brando's own request, recites a poem written by his father, a rather elliptical one, and Brando's character picks it up immediately -- "Ah, the cat." And the discussion about Curious George. And Brando's momentary melancholy as he looks around the college dorm, an environment as alien to him as the planet Neptune, shrugs and comments, "Well, I didn't miss nuthin'." It isn't funny. It's touching.

I thought this movie was very funny and quite original, considering the stale material it was sending up, and I still think so. Two years' worth of additional viewings hasn't changed things. You must see it, if only to hear Bert Parks sing "I ain't gonna work on Maggie's farm no more."


21 of 25 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 59 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed