Back to the Future Part III (1990) Poster

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9/10
Tremendous fun and a worthy concluding instalment to a great trilogy
TheLittleSongbird15 April 2010
I loved the first film, and while a step down I enjoyed the second as well. The third film is tremendous fun from start to finish, and contrary to what the other reviewers say I prefer this over the second. Yes the storyline is mediocre in places, but Doc's romance was touching and the steam-train finale was phenomenally staged. The film is set in the Old West and gives the stars a chance to revel in the situations that made the matinée western serials such a delight for so many people. The script is as witty and clever as the ones in the first two films, the direction is once again excellent and I loved the casting of the old western favourites such as Harry Carey Jnr and Pat Buttram. And as always Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd are on cracking form as Marty and Doc. Overall, despite the occasionally mediocre story, this is a worthy end to a great trilogy. 9/10 Bethany Cox
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5/10
It's not a terrible film, but it's a letdown compared to the first
Leofwine_draca17 June 2016
It's fair to say that BACK TO THE FUTURE PART III is the third and least of the BACK TO THE FUTURE trilogy; it's merely an average Hollywood comedy adventure movie with sci-fi flourishes, while the first two films in the trilogy were bona fide classics.

The problem with this film is that the science fiction material is really limited to just the first twenty minutes. For most of the running time, this film is merely an ordinary western adventure which seems happy to run through all of the clichés in the genre: there's the duel on the dusty screen, the gang of horse-riding villains, the showdowns in the saloon, the chases, and the unwanted romantic sub-plots. The inclusion of the Mary Steenburgen character was a particular reason I remember for disliking this film when I watched it as a kid.

It's certainly not a bad film, although it seems worse when you compare it to the earlier films. Michael J. Fox remains good value even though he's only required to go through the motions this time, although Christopher Lloyd's acting goes beyond the boundaries of ham and becomes quite ridiculous. Still, at least the movie picks up for the extended train sequence at the climax, which doesn't disappoint and recaptures some of the old movie magic.
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6/10
Too silly with the Old West
SnoopyStyle14 October 2013
This movie continues from BTTF2. Marty McFly (Michael J Fox) is stuck in 1955 and Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) is stuck 1885. Doc is happy where he is, and he left the broken DeLorean to Marty. When they find that Doc gets killed only a week after leaving Marty the letter, Marty must repair the DeLorean, return to the Old West, and rescue Doc from his premature demise.

While I understand the allure of going to the old West for director Robert Zemeckis, it just makes the movie seem hokey. I understand to go back to the 1955 Well a third time would be too complicated. The old west has a lot of Hollywood traditions tied in. But it feels like little more than one of those frontier amusement recreations. It's no longer profound, and it's the end of the franchise.
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perfect last chapter
Kirpianuscus29 August 2016
the past has new aspect. and this fact is real seductive. because it is a special homage to the westerns and, in same measure, perfect scene for a nice, amusing and charming love story. the old clichés of a classic genre are reinvented. the atmosphere of saloon, the malefactor, the innocent , the old maid and the hero , the sheriff and the friendship, the roots of the great Marty McFly who, from Calvin to Clint does a long travel , the energy and the humor and ZZ Top as the ideal spice , all as bricks of the most inspired final chapter of a series who remains memorable for its public. Robert Zemeckis , in the case of Back to the Future has the gift to be more than model of Emmett Brown because, after 25 years from its final shot, after 31 years after its born, the series remains the most comfortable and fast time machine.
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Easy to follow and easy to enjoy but yet far from being simplistic or patronising – a great family blockbuster
bob the moo4 January 2007
Stuck back in 1955, Marty receives a letter from Doc Brown that was written in 1885. Marty takes the letter to Doc in 1955 and together they discover where Doc in 1885 hid the DeLorean. However while uncovering the machine, Marty spots a gravestone that shows Doc was shot in the back and killed by Mad Dog Tannen a mere week after writing the letter. Using the DeLorean, Marty goes back to 1885 to save Doc by brining him back to 1985 where it all began; however on arrival he almost immediately gets into trouble with Mad Dog himself.

Having done the future in the previous film, this final instalment in the trilogy goes back to the old west to produce and enjoyable story while also poking fun at the traditions of the western. Similar to the first two films it is a solid family film with an easy to follow time travel plot. It also continues similar themes around the main one of the characters trying to get "back to the future" while we have other subplots regarding Biff, romance and so on. It isn't that deep or that complex but it delivers a solid story with a good heart that is never overshadowed by specific scenes of action and it is affectionate and fun. As director Zemeckis does a great job of pacing the film and providing fun that straddles both genres to good effect and the whole thing does look very professional.

The cast continue to be be as good as they were in the other two films and mostly buy into the tone of the film and support it. Fox shows why he was a big draw when he was younger and is the real heart of the film. He just about holds his own alongside scene-stealing Lloyd (although his "great scott" stuff did get a bit old after a while). Wilson does his usual routine but still makes it feel pretty funny, while Tolkan does the same in a smaller role. Steenburger is a nice addition and works well with Lloyd in their join scenes. Thompson is reasonably OK for all she has to do.

Overall then a fun and affectionate film that acts as a fitting conclusion to the trilogy. Easy to follow and easy to enjoy but yet far from being simplistic or patronising, it is a great family blockbuster that crosses genres and does so with a good heart.
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8/10
Wild West up Doc
kosmasp23 May 2020
A bit of a riff on the what's up doc quote/line you may know from a completely different place. And a completely different place is where the movie goes. Because after the immediate past and the immediate future (30 years more or less can be considered that in my book), we get to the old West. And we pay tribute to the Westerns in many ways.

One of them being Marty calling himself Clint Eastwood. A name that is synonymous with Westerns like almost no other (there's also the Duke of course). Again the chemistry between Doc and Marty is amazing and the backbone of the movie. This being shot back to back after the second one was finished really helped. Getting a trailer at the end of part 2 to get crowds or rather give them a taste was also very well thought of. Marketing wise it may have been a new milestone, a new way and path for others to follow.

But money aside (and the trilogy made a lot of it), it seems we do end the movie series here. Even if there are always talks about sequels, I cannot imagine the original crew (or cast for that matter) to return for another run. Especially considering the health issues Michael J Fox has to handle. Having said that, this is a high note and a good way to end it all. A series that brought us or gave us very early performances in small roles by Billy Zane, Elijah Wood and Elisabeth Shue, to name a couple. But a series that especially made us fall in love with Doc Brown and Marty McFly ... knock knock: McFly, anyone home? Yes also a lot of memorable quotes too - Great Scott!
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7/10
"Sure, and I hope you're considering the future, Mr. Eastwood".
classicsoncall16 April 2016
Warning: Spoilers
I thought this was a fun film, but for reasons most viewers wouldn't even have considered. For starters, since the Western is my favorite movie genre, the Wild West setting allowed the film makers to introduce a trio of old time cowboy actors to the story. I don't think their character names were mentioned in the picture, but it was cool to see Harry Carey Jr., Pat Buttram and Dub Taylor hanging around the old saloon offering their take on Hill Valley newcomer Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox). I had to wonder if they might have all appeared together in a 'real' Western at some point along the way. I wouldn't bet against it.

Then with all that Clint Eastwood business, the film brings up a great trivia point when Marty makes his appearance outside a movie theater in 1955, and right there is a poster for "Revenge of the Creature". That was the movie in which Clint Eastwood made his screen debut for just a brief moment, trying to figure out what happened to a missing lab mouse! That 'Creature' by the way, was the Creature From the Black Lagoon, and the movie was the second in the franchise consisting of three films.

Regarding the actual story, I've long ago given up on trying to figure out how the time travel stuff works, it's just not that important. There was a time I would have twisted myself into a pretzel trying to keep it all straight but I've found that just going with the flow is a whole lot easier. Take Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) for example, his presence in 1885 for eight months should have had some impact on the space-time continuum for events in 1955 and 1985, but what's the point of trying to figure that out. By the time we get to the finale, old Doc is whizzing around the cosmos in his tricked out flying train with Clara (Mary Steenburgen) and his two little pardners.

So the best thing to do here I guess is just have some fun with the picture, knowing that the saga of Marty and Doc has come to it's final conclusion. For all the players who appeared in all three episodes, good job, it had to be a once in a googolplex experience.
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6/10
may have gone too far...
lee_eisenberg29 July 2006
I actually didn't like "Back to the Future Part III" as much as I and II, but it's still pretty fun. All the stuff about Clint Eastwood gave the movie a neat dimension (I just wonder what would have happened if anyone from 1885 had lived long enough to see the real Clint Eastwood get famous). If the movie has any problem, it's that they sort of make the Old West look idealistic. Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd and Elisabeth Shue turn in their usual dependable performances, and Mary Steenburgen is passable. But either way, they probably agreed that it all had to end here.

And remember: your future is what you make it.
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9/10
Back to the Future Part III
jboothmillard16 June 2005
Warning: Spoilers
The first film is brilliant, the second film is less brilliant, and this final instalment in the trilogy is just as good as the first, from director Robert Zemeckis (Forrest Gump) and executive producer Steven Spielberg. You remember that Dr. 'Doc' Emmet Brown was struck by lightning in 1955, sending him to 1885, but he managed to send a letter to his friend, Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox). Marty has found 1955 Doc, after the moment he sent him back to 1985 in the first film, and he needs his help send him back again. In this letter, Doc explains that he was okay, and that he does not want Marty to come back for him, but after finding the DeLoreon time machine in the mine where Doc left it, not far away is a grave stone with Doc's name on it, made a week after he sent the letter. So now Marty ignores Doc's wishes, and goes to 1885 to save his life, and bring him back to 1985. Marty briefly meets the man who is set to kill Doc, Buford 'Mad Dog' Tannen (Thomas F. Wilson, also playing a brief Biff Tannen), and he eventually finds Doc, who has been working as a blacksmith. They cannot go back to the future because the DeLoreon's fuel system was damaged, but they get an idea to push it to get it up to the speed of 88mph, using the train. This idea is slowed though, when after rescuing her, and changing history doing it, Doc meets, and is infatuated with school teacher Clara Clayton (Mary Steenburgen). Mad Dog meanwhile has now instead of Doc, intends to kill Marty, or, should that be Clint Eastwood (which Marty called himself). Doc was planning not to go back with Marty, but he made him realise he does not belong in this time, and say a heart felt goodbye to Clara. The day of the train "experiment" comes, and after defeating Mad Dog, Marty and Doc prepare to go back to the future, but Clara is not far behind when she realises Doc's explanation for leaving was true. In the end, after a great train scene, Marty made it back, and after getting out of it, the time machine was destroyed like Doc wanted, but he and Clara on the hover board never made it to the car. But don't worry, after Marty gets back to girlfriend Jennifer (Elisabeth Shue), Doc returns in the train, which he converted into a time machine, and also reveals his two young boys, before blasting off again, oh, and he explained that the future hasn't been written yet, so a happy ending for both Marty and Doc. Also starring Lea Thompson as Maggie McFly/Lorraine McFly. An improvement from the previous sequel, both the story and characters are all lovable, Doc in particular got a deserved love story, a good adventure and western film, with a little technology involved. Very good!
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8/10
This Was The Only BTTF 'Keeper' For Me
ccthemovieman-113 February 2007
Once I saw each of these "Back To The Future" films on VHS, after viewing all of them earlier in the movie theaters, I wound up only keeping one: this one.

This film - the third and final one in the "Back To The Future" series, didn't have the annoying bully "Biff" (except in a subservient role at the very end) and it had a nice western look and flavor to it.

Yes, it's a little loud and the two main characters - "Marty McFly" (Michael J. Fox) and "Dr. Emmetr Brown" (Christopher Lloyd) mainly shout to each other (probably to hear over the noisy soundtrack!), but it's generally an enjoyable two hours of film with fun-type characters and a cool Old-West theme.

Even the bad guy is kind of fun to watch. It also offers good humor and two pretty women, Mary Steenburgen and Elisabeth Shue. I loved the train scenes, too, which were beautiful.
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7/10
Back from the past
Tweekums11 July 2009
Warning: Spoilers
After the much darker part two things lighten up for the concluding part of the story. Here there are plenty of jokes and some nice references to other films, in particular "A Fist Full of Dollars".

When the film opens Marty is still trapped in 1955 but the letter he received that the end of part two tells him that Doc is alive and well living in 1885. The letter also informs Marty where the DeLorean has been hidden and how, with the help of 1955-Doc he can get it running and return to 1985. However before Marty can do that he learns that Doc died a few days after sending his letter to instead of returning to 1985 he dresses up a rather camp 1950s cowboy costume and goes to 1885. Here he meets his great-great-grandparents who he tells he is called Clint Eastwood. When he head goes into town he ends up making an enemy of the local gunman Buford 'Mad Dog' Tannen, an ancestor of Biff. This is also the person who had been destined to kill Doc. When Marty saves Doc at the party to celebrate the construction of the new town clock he is challenged to a duel. Now he has two days to either prepare to fight or to get the DeLorean up to 88MPH without any suitable fuel. There is also a subplot involving Doc and the town's new teacher Clara Clayton.

While I think this is probably the weakest of the trilogy it is still a pretty good film and it wraps the story up nicely. As well as being fun science fiction it also works as a decent comedy western, especially if you are a fan of Clint Eastwood's spaghetti westerns. As in the first two parts Micael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd were great in the leading roles.
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10/10
Once more for old time's sake.
BA_Harrison5 December 2010
After the brain-melting series of temporal twists and turns performed by Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) and Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) in Part II of the Back to the Future trilogy, the time-travelling pair keep it relatively simple for Part III, spending nearly the whole film in one place and one year: the wicked wild, wild west of 1885, where Marty meets his Oirish ancestors, Doc falls in love (with schoolteacher Clara Clayton, played by the lovely Mary Steenburgen), and both face mortal danger from gun-slinging outlaw Mad Dog Tannen (Thomas F. Wilson) and his gang.

Considering that it was shot back-to-back with Part II, the lack of narrative complexity for the final chapter comes as a bit of a surprise, but does little to diminish the film's overall ability to entertain: Part III might be a less frantic affair, but thanks to an excellent script packed with witty dialogue, welcome character development, plenty of tips of the Stetson to the previous two films, and a rousing finale, it is no less enjoyable than its predecessors, thus making the whole trilogy one of the most consistently brilliant series of movies ever.
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One review covering a 3 BTTF movies, a great series 1985, 1989, 1990.
TxMike9 June 2001
As of this date, the 3 "Back to the Future" films have these IMDb ratings -- #1 (1985) 7.8 of 26,091 votes. #2 (1989) 6.6 of 9492 votes. #3 (1990) 6.4 of 8230 votes. So, it is clear that the first episode is the most popular, no contest, in both rating and number of votes.

I, too, think #1 is the best. In fact, I think it should stand among the best films of all time. Not for any one facet, but for the total entertainment that it provides. Almost all of us dream of "time travel." BTTF certainly is not the first to explore time travel, but the way it does it is unique. Plus the fact that this is clearly a comedy, but one that is so well conceived and written that I never find myself think of it as a comedy. I've been a long time fan of Chris Lloyd's, since his days as Jim Ignatowski ("flower child" spelled backward), and he is so perfect as Doc Brown. And, of course, Michael J. Fox as Marty McFly "defines" a role as few have been defined in films.

The script is uniformly superb in all 3 versions, and to me that is what really makes them "believable" within the context of a pure fantasy. Plus, although all the "science" in the 3 films is "bad science", which for a scientist makes it even funnier, they don't overlook any details. They always offer a "science" explanation for what Doc is about to do, even though it is completely nonsense.

Tonight, at the end of #3, I first realized one of the reasons I like the BTTF films so much. Ever take a vacation to a totally different part of your country or world? And when you get back home after a few weeks, to the familiar, you sorta mentally pinch yourself and think, "Just two days ago I was riding a train through southern France, drinking wine by the river, and sleeping in the 200-yr-old silk factory turned home in the country." And you look around, you're back home to a totally different world.

That's what I believe Marty McFly felt when he arrived home, saw Jennifer asleep on the swing. He had just spent a week during 1885, evading a band of Indians, seeing his original ancestors from Scotland, fighting an infamous gunfighter, and making a harrowing escape from the past by being pushed to 88 mph by a train that blows up, and now he is back home to the familiar. We can all identify with that, and the end of each of the 3 BTTF films gives us that identification.

The original, #1, involved the existing friendship between Marty and Doc Brown. Marty accidentally gets sent back 30 years to 1955, and must enlist a young Doc's help to get home. Meanwhile he inadvertently gets his future mother interested in him, jeopardizing the future relationship of his "parents." The old newspaper accounts of the lightning strike of the clock tower is used as a source of energy to get Marty back home. His fight with Biff in 1955 has altered history and his 1985 family is apparently much better off as a result.

#2 hinges on Biff inadvertently getting a copy of an almanac for "future" events and he dishonestly uses future sports results to gain fortune and power, and drastically change the future. Marty and Doc have to retrieve the almanac before Biff uses it, to restore history to its proper order. It ends in a way that sets up the #3 sequel.

In #3 Marty gets a Western Union letter that Doc Brown had actually written in 1885 and requested delivery at the specific time in the future. Doc has ended up in 1885, is content, and insists that Marty not try to interfere. However, Marty discovers a tombstone and historical account of Doc being shot in the back over an $80 issue. So Marty has to go back and help Doc avoid that fate.

To me, the original is definitely the better of the 3. The second and third ones are totally different, and I would rate them about the same. The science is funky, a rigorous analysis can uncover a number of "discrepancies", but to me none of that matters. The BTTF films are just great fun, and the good guys always come out on top. And there's nothing wrong with that.

2015 UPDATE: I bought the 3-disk BluRay set and they really are an upgrade from the DVDs, better picture and sound.
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7/10
A time traveling dolorian that runs on gas!
Quinoa198414 July 2000
I'm sorry to say this is the third best of the trilogy, which means it is at the bottom. So I recommend to see either one of the first two if you want. But, that doesn't mean this film is a waste of time compared to other films. For instance, this is a way to keep from watching CNN. But seriously, this isn't all that bad, because for fans of westerns who want a chuckle, this is for you. Or if you want to see Christopher Lloyd drunk. Sometimes funny, sometimes cute, usually overdone. B+
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9/10
Back to the Future Part III was a fine way to end the series
tavm22 October 2015
Yesterday, me and my movie theatre-working friend rewatched all three Back to the Future films for a one-time-only showing. Since the second one partially took place on October 21, 2015-that became the reason for that particular day's reshowing of them all. Anyway, this one focuses on Marty McFly's (Michael J. Fox) traveling to 1885 to search for his pal Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) who seemed to accidentally end up there at the end of the last one. Also, in this one, Doc falls for a teacher named Clara (Mary Steenburgen). Oh, and Lea Thompson and Thomas F. Wilson return to play their character's ancestors. After the last one was almost devoid of laughs, this one has quite a bit of them with much of the touching sentiment mostly missing from the previous entry. And the message Doc says at the end is quite pertinent, if I say so myself! So on that note, Back to the Future Part III is well worth seeing.
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8/10
A nice ending to one of my favorite trilogies
ComedyFan20107 May 2014
This time McFly goes back to 1985 to save the Doc.

It is my least favorite of the three movies but still very entertaining and a great ending to the series.

I will first say what makes me like this movie less than the other two. It is mainly because in the first two movies I liked the interaction of him with his family and how it affects the present. This is missing in the second part. We still get to see his ancestors and get the first McFly born in America pee on Marty, but it is very short. It is also less of a sci fi and more of a western. Which is also what makes it the favorite of the three for my father who loves westerns since he was a kid!.

But aside from this the movie is very good. We still get to see a lot of Marty and the Doc. Doc even gets a little romance in this movie. Mary Steenburgen was great as Clara and they had a good chemistry. Biff's ancestor is of course the villain here and again he is on wonderful. "Clint Eastwood, what kind of a stupid name is that?!". Also great action towards the end with the chasing of the train, was very exciting. The final scene is also awesome, just a right quotation to end this great series with.
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8/10
Think four-dimensionally!
Coventry2 January 2009
Seeing the surprise and originality factor had pretty much vanished entirely after the two first films, Bob Gale and Robert Zemeckis were forced to come up with a slightly different approach for the finale of their hugely successful and ultimately entertaining time-traveling "Back to the Future" trilogy. They masterfully succeeded in this by drastically altering the time setting and by shifting the main emphasis towards Christoper Lloyd's character Doc instead of Marty. Number three takes Marty back to the Wild West in 1885, where Doc has settled himself in a small village after the DeLorean's short circuit in 1955. Doc had instructed Marty to return to his own time and let him remain in 1885, but upon discovering Doc's tombstone indicating a premature death, Marty travels back in time after all. With the DeLorean damaged beyond repair, they now both find themselves stuck in the Wild West and their attempts to find a solution are subsequently interrupted by Biff Tannen's criminal ancestor Buford and by the Doc himself falling in love with the charming school teacher Clara Clayton. The change in tone almost leads to this third film having its very own and independent personality. Those who endlessly claim that part three is the weakest and least memorable entry of the trilogy probably didn't yet realize that the source of paradox-jokes and situational humor was as good as exhausted after two films already. This film contains a different type of comedy, as it actually qualifies as a respectful Spaghetti Western satire (Marty imitates everything he learned about the Wild West from watching Clint Eastwood films) and a highly likable romantic comedy. And then still the die-hard fans of parts one and two have no actual reason to complain, since most of the characters re-appear as their own ancestors (like Michael J. Fox in a double role as the first McFly who entered America, the aforementioned malignant Buford Tannen and even Mr. Strickland as a late 19th Century lawman). The eventual return to 1985 is enormously spectacular and exciting, with the DeLorean being put on rails and pushed by a locomotive in order to reach 88 miles per hour, and the director's interpretation and re-creation of the Western period is prototypic but irresistibly charming, with raunchy saloons, unhygienic cowboys spitting around everywhere, a town's festival (with live performance by ZZ Top!) and the cavalry chasing after Indians. We already knew Michael J. Fox and Christoper Lloyd were ideally cast as Marty and Doc, but now also Mary Steenburgen gives away a stellar performance as the cute teacher and love-interest. "Back to the Future Part III" is a stupendous film and don't let anyone tell you otherwise!
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9/10
Provides Utter Joy At Present Just Like When It Was Initially Released
sunwarrior1324 October 2012
Warning: Spoilers
The final installment in the Back to the Future trilogy picks up where the second film left off, but it casts off the dizzying time travel of the first two films for mostly routine comedy set in the Old West.This science fiction comedy was directed by Robert Zemeckis and starred Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Mary Steenburgen, Thomas F. Wilson, and Lea Thompson. It takes place immediately after the events of Back to the Future Part II. While stranded in 1955, Marty McFly discovers that his friend Dr. Emmett "Doc" Brown was killed by Biff Tannen's great- grandfather Buford. Marty decides to travel to 1885 to rescue Doc and return to his own time line.

In the movie,Marty McFly receives a 70-year-old letter from his inventor friend, Doc Brown, who tells Marty that he has retreated a century in time to live out a relatively quiet life in the Old West. Doc Brown reveals that he hid his DeLorean car/time machine in an abandoned mine outside town, and when Marty does some research and discovers that the Doc died shortly after writing the letter, he decides to find the car, travel back in time, and warn the Doc about his demise. Meanwhile, the Doc, who has fallen in love with a local woman, realizes he can't hide in the past from the problems he has caused to the time flow in the previous two adventures. He reluctantly decides to return to the present with Marty, but first, they have to find a way to get the DeLorean up to time-travel velocity with a broken fuel line and no gasoline.

The simplicity of plot, and the wide expansiveness of its use of space, are a refreshing change from the convoluted, visually cramped and cluttered second part.Also,this is a good deal more likable because the product plugs have been held back, and Zemeckis is clearly having fun alluding to his favorite westerns; there's also a certain sweetness and charm in the Lloyd-Steenburgen romance.In addition to that,it avoids many of the previous sequel's narrative and logical pitfalls and reengages more successfully with the simple, direct pleasures that made the first film such a hit. It was an utter joy in 1990 when it was released and again when the viewer watches it at present.
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3/10
Not quite as good as the previous two trips in time
studioAT5 September 2017
Warning: Spoilers
To come back for a sequel to a beloved film is risky in itself, but 'Back to the Future part 2' managed to be a good addition. However, to come back again for a third go is riskier still.

I'm not a big fan of westerns, so this film is perhaps my least favourite of the three. I can't deny it had its moments, but for me the fact that the plot was more centred on Doc rather than Marty put me off a little.

It's good, but for me not great.
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Training Wheels
tedg25 March 2010
I enjoy groups of films, in a sort of "mix tape" way. Of particular interest are sequels and series where different writers and filmmakers are involved. I find the first three Frankenstein films differ in amazing ways for instance, ways that deepen the experience for each film.

Here we have Spielberg clone Zemeckis in control of all three in the group. The first was apparently intended as a single project which had a risky creation, involving many changes. Some lack of coherence was introduced because of major changes introduced by the curse of test screenings.

The second and third, however were written and filmed together. This was the first big Hollywood project designed in response to questionnaires. You can see it in the recipe. Need more love interest? More actual action? Less Biff? Costumes? Chop, chop, chop.

There is a clever thing this movie has that the others did not. It knows it is a movie. It sends our travelers back in time not into an earlier version of their world, but into a movie world. Specifically, it is the most stable genre of all: the western. As soon as Marty arrives, we have the most common trope in westerns: wild Indians yelping as if it were 1955, chased by the cavalry. There are a few jokes about being not in the real world but in a movie world, including the requirements for what happens next.

It is not enough. By this time, we are tired of the whole thing.

Ted's Evaluation -- 1 of 3: You can find something better to do with this part of your life.
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10/10
Best one yet
bevo-1367829 March 2020
Warning: Spoilers
Great way to end the series. I really liked the bit with train
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8/10
Oh, I know you did send me back to the future. But I'm back! I'm back from the future.
hitchcockthelegend21 November 2009
Doc Brown is back in 1885 in the Old West, soon to be joined by Marty who has found that Doc is in mortal danger from Burford "Mad-Dog" Tannen.

Rounding out what turned out to be a hugely popular trilogy, Back to the Future Part III restored the core essence heart of Part 1, whilst simultaneously tying up all the threads with a fully formed story. More sedate in its telling (not hard following on from the manic pacing of part 2) part 3 fuses science fiction malarkey with, well, Western malarkey. All played out with the usual array of clever jokes and series reprises - only in a Wild Wild West setting. An interesting point to note is how the roles of Doc & Marty have been reversed from the first film, here Marty is the maniacal plot axis, whizzing around getting into scrapes as Doc ambles around in love, courtesy of the delightfully classic looking Mary Steenburgen as Clara Clayton. Thomas F. Wilson returns for villain duties as Tannen, a Western bully villain pulled straight out of many a classic Oater from way back in the day, and Lea Thompson & Elisabeth Shue ensure the "past" is not forgotten.

When Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale started making Back To The Future in 1985, could they have envisaged that they would make three films and end up with a steam engine time machine in the Wild West? Possibly not, but as part 3 hurtles (literally) towards the suspense laden finale, two things are for certain. One is that they wisely closed the series down with a surefire coda winner. Two is that between them they crafted one of the most entertaining family trilogies to have ever graced the screen. No doubt about the fact that part one is the uniformly class act of the three, but parts two & three themselves reward groups of all ages. Great Scot indeed. 8.5/10
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8/10
Definitely the lesser one of the three but that doesn't mean it's bad.
Boba_Fett113831 December 2006
I'll admit that probably the reason why I find this movie to be the lesser one of the three Back to the Future movies, has all to do with the reason that Western has never really been my favorite movie genre. This movie is almost set entirely in the Wild West of the late 19th century.

The movie features all of the Western clichés but at the same time it doesn't ridicule the genre. Pistol fights at dawn, hanging, robbing the stagecoach, typical villains, a sheriff, you name it and its in this movie. You may say that Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale pay a great homage to the longtime gone genre of classic spaghetti Westerns, with using all of the typical clichés and small references.

"Back to the Future" and "Back to the Future Part II" were two brilliantly written movies, with ingenious connected plot lines, moments and characters. "Back to the Future Part III" is also well written and is definitely fun and entertaining but just not as clever or ingenious as the previous two movies. "Back to the Future Part III" surely does still offer plenty of enough entertainment and cleverness. It makes sure that the movie overall is an entertaining one, that is also definitely helped by its characters and good, quick, fun directing from Robert Zemeckis, who with the Back to the Future movies made himself immortal as a movie director.

Besides the Wild West concept the movie also differs from the other previous two Back to the Future movies in many more ways. Of course the Wild West already provides the movie with a totally different atmosphere and premise than the previous two Back to the Future movies but also the storytelling and approach makes this movie a 'different' one. You can really say that perhaps this time the real main character of the movie is the Doc. The main plot line (a love story) of the movie involves him. Not much room for Marty and his family this time in this one, unlike had been the case in the previous two movies. I liked the previous two movies so much because Marty clashed in his past and future with his own relatives, that were alive at that time period. It always resulted in some comical- and brilliant written and constructed moments. "Back to the Future Part III" doesn't really have enough moments of that. It still has some fun moments involving time traveling and of course mainly the cultural differences that show what happens if characters from this time period are being set back in the early 19th century. It makes some of the moments in the movie still hilarious, such as Marty's clothes, his choice to name himself Clint Eastwood, Frisbees and the opening ceremony of the well known clock from the Back to the Future movies.

The movie of course also future 'distant' relatives of characters that are alive in 1985, the real-time, time period of the entire trilogy. Some play a more prominent role than others. Again the main villain is a Tannen. Buford 'Mad Dog' Tannen, to be exact. A typical stereotype example of a dumb but ruthless Western villain. He is perfectly portrayed by Thomas F. Wilson. The entire cast is basically great. Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd have really grown into their roles and the chemistry is still there. They are being helped this time by the great Mary Steenburgen, as Doc's love interest.

What I love about the Back to the Future movies is that they always pick things up were the last movie ended. It makes the movie really a trilogy that can also be perfectly watched as one movie, just as the Lord of the Rings and Star Wars movies.

The movie is really great looking with great sets, costumes and make-up effects that suit the time period of the movie just right. What the movie also does well is blending in the different atmospheres of the different time periods with each others. When the movie is set back in 1985, you don't have the feeling like you're watching a totally different movie. Dean Cundey's cinematography of the movie is great and he also plays a small cameo role in the movie itself by the way. Alan Silvestri's musical score is also great but again also the lesser of the three in my opinion. But it's still great, so what am I really complaining about...The early special effects are also quite good, considering its period this movie was made.

The movie is really great, fun, clean, adventurous entertainment to watch from start till finish, with fun characters, settings and directing. A fitting conclusion of perhaps the most entertaining movie trilogy of all time.

8/10

http://bobafett1138.blogspot.com/
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7/10
An epic ending to a great trilogy
Calicodreamin19 May 2020
A true action adventure in the west, the final installment in the back to the future trilogy delivers on action and adventure. The ending train scene is nail-biting! The storyline is well developed and flows easily from the second movie. The scenery is realistic and the old west characters feel authentic.
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7/10
Fitting last chapter
TBJCSKCNRRQTreviews11 August 2011
Marty gets to 1885 to save Doc, but they may be stuck there and the clock is ticking on getting back. This one does follow the other two, but it doesn't relate that directly to them(except for tying up loose ends Part II left for it so it'd have *something*), other than referencing the first one somewhat(much less than the second did). It's not at a high school comedy, nor a carefully written homage to the original, it's a Western adventure with time travel. The core concept remains the same, if messing up the time-line seems less dangerous this time around(and in general it doesn't feel as exciting as the others). The focus is on Emmett now, and with little story left to tell, they give him a love interest. Tannen remains the villain, and is the only one left to really overact(except for Lloyd, the mug-master), not to mention one of the only to return. We do get the trilogy treatment, with this returning to the roots and revealing information we didn't know before and a sense of closure. The humor is again pretty silly, in fact maybe moreso than earlier. As a period piece, it really works, you believe that you're seeing early US. I recommend this to fans of the franchise. 7/10
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