7.2/10
1,801
18 user 5 critic

The Silver Chair 

Unrated | | Fantasy, Family, Adventure | TV Series (1990)
Eustace, along with a new companion named Jill Pole, is brought back to Narnia. The pair are told by Aslan they must search for King Caspian's missing son, Prince Rilian.
Reviews

Episodes

Seasons


Years



1  
1990  
5 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
David Thwaites ...  Eustace Clarence Scrubb 6 episodes, 1990
Camilla Power ...  Jill Pole 6 episodes, 1990
Tom Baker ...  Puddleglum 5 episodes, 1990
Richard Henders ...  Prince Rilian / ... 5 episodes, 1990
Ailsa Berk Ailsa Berk ...  Aslan / ... 5 episodes, 1990
Barbara Kellerman ...  Green Lady 4 episodes, 1990
William Todd-Jones William Todd-Jones ...  Aslan / ... 4 episodes, 1990
Ronald Pickup ...  Aslan 4 episodes, 1990
Warwick Davis ...  Glimfeather / ... 3 episodes, 1990
Geoffrey Russell Geoffrey Russell ...  King Caspian 3 episodes, 1990
Edit

Storyline

Eustace is sent to a horrible school and finds a friend in Jill Pole, who's also running from the bullies and looking for a place to hide. The two of them are magically transported from the garden shed into the magical world of Narnia, where they are entrusted with a task by Aslan: to rescue the king's stolen son, Prince Rilian. Together with Puddleglum the Marshwiggle, they must travel north across the mountains, dodge giants, and journey down into the earth itself to rescue Rilian from the mysterious evil that holds him bound there. Written by Kathy Li

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Barbara Kellerman, who played the White Witch in The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrom, also played the Old Hag, in Prince Caspian, (a fact which often gets overlooked), and played The Green Lady in The Silver Chair. The fact that she played both the White Witch and the Green Lady lead some viewers in the late 80''s early 90's to believe that they were the same person. But it is very clear in the books that they are not. The White Witch is Jadis, and author C.S. Lewis clearly explained where she came from in the books. The Green Lady is a giant, and she is quite different in the books. The fact that the same actress played all three characters is simply a contrivance of the BBC, something they tended to do, especially if the character in question wore a lot of make-up, and British audiences would understand they were difference characters. US audiences, apparently, not so much. See more »

Quotes

Puddleglum: Suppose... suppose we have only dreamed and made up these things like sun, sky, stars, and moon, and Aslan himself. In that case, it seems to me that the made-up things are a good deal better than the real ones. And if this black pits of a kingdom is the best you can make, then it's a poor world. And we four can make a dream world to lick your real one hollow.
Green Lady: How dare you threaten me!
Puddleglum: As for me, I shall live like a Narnian even if there isn't any Narnia. So thank you very much for supper. We're ...
See more »

Crazy Credits

As the credits roll, we see moments from other movies in the series. (This is the final movie in the series.) See more »

Alternate Versions

Some releases do not have the final credits rolling to the background of different scenes throughout the entire Narnia series. In the 2002 DVD release the credits roll instead to an image of the silver chair. See more »

User Reviews

Dull Film, Stunning Wicked Witch
20 December 2003 | by Dan1863SicklesSee all my reviews

One of the most intriguing and unsettling things about the NARNIA books is the way lifelong bachelor C.S. Lewis tends to portray evil witches not as hideous crones but as stunning and sophisticated young women. Not surprisingly, the most memorable character in this film is the Emerald Witch, portrayed with subtle sensuality and aristocratic charm by regal and dark-eyed Barbara Kellerman.

Kellerman's Emerald Witch is a forceful, intelligent, and thoroughly attractive villainess. As the daughter of the White Witch brutally slain by the insufferably pompous do-gooder talking lion Aslan in the first book, the Emerald Witch is not so much a villain as passionate woman bent on revenge. Note her entrance on Ettinsmoor, riding by the side of the dazed and clearly besotted Prince Rilian. While the child actors mumble and screech about their quest, Kellerman underplays her evil intentions, popping off snappy one liners like "What do you hear, what do you say?" Only when alone with Aslan's image staring out at her from a crystal ball does she reveal her true agenda, pulling a Cagney face and sneering, "you . . . dirty cat . . . you killed my mother!" The allusion to Cagney is reinforced later, when she is cornered by Prince Rilian. Instead of dodging his sword point, she grabs the blade and drives it into her own bosom, shrieking "Top of the world, Ma!" exactly like Cagney in WHITE HEAT.


4 of 11 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 18 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

18 November 1990 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(6 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed