6.9/10
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2 user 1 critic

Ya sluzhil v okhrane Stalina, ili Opyt dokumentalnoy mifologii (1990)

This controversial documentary created a storm in Russia by taking the cloak off a violent, repressive period of Soviet history. Filmmaker Semyon Aranovich found the last surviving personal... See full summary »

Director:

Semyon Aranovich
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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Nadezhda Alliluyeva Nadezhda Alliluyeva ... Stalin's 2nd wife
Fyodor Fedorovsky Fyodor Fedorovsky ... The Bolshoi Theatre
Alexey Rybin Alexey Rybin ... Stalin's bodyguard
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Storyline

This controversial documentary created a storm in Russia by taking the cloak off a violent, repressive period of Soviet history. Filmmaker Semyon Aranovich found the last surviving personal bodyguard of Joseph Stalin, Alexey Robin, who began working for the dictator in the 1930s. Written by Ulf Kjell Gür

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Genres:

Documentary

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Details

Country:

Soviet Union

Language:

Russian

Release Date:

4 May 1990 (Netherlands) See more »

Also Known As:

I Was Stalin's Bodyguard See more »

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User Reviews

 
How strange Stalin could seem when you got to know him.
16 September 2007 | by lee_eisenbergSee all my reviews

Most people probably - or hopefully - know that Joseph Stalin murdered almost 20 million of his own citizens. Thus it's hard to view him as having any humanity. Here in "Ya sluzhil v okhrane Stalina, ili Opyt dokumentalnoy mifologii" (called "I Was Stalin's Bodyguard" in English), we get to meet one of the brutal dictator's confidants. Through this man's stories, Big Joe sounds almost like any other person, not the type whom you'd expect to commit genocide. But also, we get to see how the Soviet Union under Stalin became very much like Nazi Germany: the children going into training to learn how to be "good citizens", and the airplanes flying in formation to spell out "Stalinu slava" ("Glory to Stalin"). They had so many resources and they used the resources for these purposes.

Probably the main thing to derive from this is that the USSR never really had communism: under communism, the people own everything; in the Soviet Union, the state owned everything and the people owned nothing (some revolution!). But no matter how we look at it, I would certainly recommend this documentary as an insight into history.


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