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5 user 2 critic

Lodz Ghetto (1988)

The Polish city of Lodz was under Nazi occupation for nearly the entire duration of WWII. The segregation of the Jewish population into the ghetto, and the subsequent horrors of the ... See full summary »

Writer:

Alan Adelson
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3 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Credited cast:
Jerzy Kosinski ... Mordechai Chaim Rumkowski (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Theodore Bikel ... (voice)
Julie Cohen Julie Cohen ... (voice)
Lynn Cohen ... (voice)
Gregory Gordon Gregory Gordon ... (voice)
Nicholas Kepros Nicholas Kepros ... (voice)
Jerry Matz Jerry Matz ... (voice)
Frederick Neumann ... (voice)
Barbara Rosenblat ... (voice)
Sam Tsoutsouvas Sam Tsoutsouvas ... (voice)
David Warrilow David Warrilow ... (voice)
Eva Wellisz Eva Wellisz ... (voice)
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Storyline

The Polish city of Lodz was under Nazi occupation for nearly the entire duration of WWII. The segregation of the Jewish population into the ghetto, and the subsequent horrors of the occupation are vividly chronicled through newsreels and photographs. The narration is taken almost entirely from journals and diaries of those who lived--and died--through the course of the occupation, with the number of different narrators diminishing over the course of the film, symbolic of the death of each narrator. Written by Jason A. Cormier <wildrose@mindspring.com>

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Taglines:

They knew their words would reach you.

Genres:

Documentary

User Reviews

 
Extraordinary
23 May 1999 | by VarlaamSee all my reviews

This is the best short Holocaust documentary I know. By "short", I mean shorter than Lanzmann's "Shoah".

The imagery is imaginative and exceptional: modern day footage of Lódz, paintings, colour photos -- lots of them. I was impressed by the sheer size of the photographic documentation, with much, most, of it unfamiliar to me anyway. It's not possible to believe that all of the photographic, and even cinematic, evidence actually comes from Lódz. There's just too much. But the short second documentary, the sequel, which follows on the videocassette release, makes it clear how that all came about.

The sequel also provides other significant information, such as the fate of Rumkowski, the leader of the ghetto Judenrat.

In these two films, writer/director Alan Adelson almost seems to be the Ken Burns of the Holocaust documentary. He arguably seems to have originated the Burns style to a certain extent, or at least appears to have received similar inspiration. Has Adelson's work really been limited to these two films alone?

The force of the narrative is really what takes Adelson's "Lódz Ghetto" out of the ordinary. The film is very dramatic, very moving, and very suspenseful, in spite of the inevitability of the outcome. If you can stand it, you will find it a profound experience.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

29 October 1994 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

Łódzkie getto See more »

Filming Locations:

Lódz, Lódzkie, Poland

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono
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