The discovery of a massive river of ectoplasm and a resurgence of spectral activity allows the staff of Ghostbusters to revive the business.

Director:

Ivan Reitman

Writers:

Dan Aykroyd (characters), Harold Ramis (characters) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
1,658 ( 159)
2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Bill Murray ... Dr. Peter Venkman
Dan Aykroyd ... Dr. Raymond Stantz
Sigourney Weaver ... Dana Barrett
Harold Ramis ... Dr. Egon Spengler
Rick Moranis ... Louis Tully
Ernie Hudson ... Winston Zeddemore
Annie Potts ... Janine Melnitz
Peter MacNicol ... Dr. Janosz Poha
Harris Yulin ... The Judge
David Margulies ... The Mayor of NY
Kurt Fuller ... Hardemeyer
Janet Margolin ... The Prosecutor
Wilhelm von Homburg ... Vigo
William T. Deutschendorf William T. Deutschendorf ... Baby Oscar (as Will Deutschendorf)
Henry J. Deutschendorf II ... Baby Oscar (as Hank Deutschendorf)
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Storyline

Having lost their status and credibility five years after covering New York City with marshmallow in Ghostbusters (1984), the once-famous band of spirit-hunters find themselves struggling to keep afloat, working odd jobs. However, when Dana Barrett and her baby, Oscar, have yet another terrifying encounter with the paranormal, it's up to Peter Venkman and his fearless team of supernatural crime-fighters to save the day. Now, once more, humanity is in danger, as rivers of slimy psycho-reactive ectoplasm, and the dreadful manifestation of the evil sixteenth-century tyrant, Vigo the Carpathian, threaten to plunge the entire city into darkness unless the selfless Ghostbusters take action. Can they save the world for the second time? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Superstars of the Supernatural are back. And this time, it's no marshmallow roast. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Peter arrives at Ray's Occult book-store, pretending to be a strange customer looking for a particular book, the gag was originally intended to be that Peter had previously made a prank phone call to Ray asking for the book, and Ray realizing it was Peter who made the call when he arrives at the store repeating the act. The prank call was not used in the final edit of the film, resulting in it seeming that Peter is just fooling around as he enters the shop. See more »

Goofs

At the end of the film, when the Ghostbusters get into the museum, the Statue of Liberty is standing. Once inside, the statue is laid down next the museum, but nothing was seen or heard. Based on her raised arm, the statue alternates between laying facing up and face down between shots. See more »

Quotes

Judge Wexler: Peter Venkman, Raymond Stantz, Egon Spengler,
[yells]
Judge Wexler: Stand up! Get up!
[the Ghostbusters stand up]
Judge Wexler: You too, Mr. Tully.
[Louis stands up]
Judge Wexler: [furious] I find guilty on all charges. I order to pay fines in the amount of $25,000 each...
[the mood slime burbles; Ray notices it]
Judge Wexler: ... and I sentence you to 18 months in the City Correctional Facility at Riker's Island.
Ray: Egie, she's twiching.
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Slimer is credited as a cast member during the closing title sequence. See more »

Alternate Versions

A subway scene was cut from the "chaos" montage, after the woman's fur coat comes to life. In the scene the subway jerks to a halt and the conductor informs the passengers that there are "technical difficulties". On the subway track, two attendants confront a large, frog-like monsters with an enormous tongue. This was meant to be one of the more frightening scenes in the film, but after takes with the two baffled attendants turned out too funny, the scene was cut. See more »


Soundtracks

On Our Own
Written by L.A. Reid, Kenneth 'Babyface' Edmonds (as Babyface) & Daryl Simmons
Produced by L.A. Reid (as L.A.) & Kenneth 'Babyface' Edmonds (as Babyface) for LA' Face, Inc.
Performed by Bobby Brown
Courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
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User Reviews

 
They're back!
30 October 2007 | by dee.reidSee all my reviews

I could lie and say I think "Ghostbusters II" is an inferior sequel to the original 1984 "Ghostbusters," but "Ghostbusters II" is an entertaining film in its own right. Nothing can come close to the gleaming perfection of the first film but damn it, the sequel works in most places. It's chiefly because the movie is just so damn entertaining! It's still mostly watchable despite its flaws and misjudgments about what the filmmakers may have seen as an apparent mean-spiritedness in a lot of people during the late '80s.

True, comedian and star Bill Murray still steals the show whenever he gets the chance and he also gets some of the best lines, and he's just so gosh-darn funny as a leading man. Screenwriter team/co-stars Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis are also in top form, and it shows in their wily and hilarious script. Unlike the first picture, though, it seems like they took the family-friendly route and didn't feel like building up to the oh-so-apocalyptic tone of the first film (even though "Ghostbusters" was still pretty funny aside from the occasional dark tone).

And also, director Ivan Reitman knows their material and it looks like the filmmakers made the wise decision of bringing back everybody from the original film, including Sigourney Weaver and Rick Moranis. It's been five years since the first film (a title card confirms it), and it seems that most of New York City doesn't even remember who the Ghostbusters are and what they did for the city. Everyone in the city is miserable and the opening moments confirm that as well. After being almost bankrupted by countless lawsuits and being unable to practice their trade because of a judicial restraining order, the boys are reduced to moonlighting in other fields, such as catering to the needs of spoiled yuppie children at their birthday parties, a task that neither Ray Stanz (Aykroyd) or Winston Zeddemore (Ernie Hudson) take pride in.

Egon Spengler (Ramis) is the only one of the original Ghostbusters who seems to have actually moved on with his life. Peter Venkman (Murray) hosts a television show called "The World of the Psychic," a show that apparently draws in modest ratings but no respected psychic will appear on his show because they think he's a fraud. Anyway, things get underway when the boys discover that nasty pink slime of supernatural origin is discovered building up underneath the city, something that old friend and Venkman's old flame Dana Barrett (Weaver) realizes first hand when the slime attacks her infant son, and it's an investigation they have to do on the down-low because of their current legal situation.

This slime, they learn, feeds off the misery and stress of a downtrodden New York City, and it's only getting stronger as the holidays are approaching. But because no one believes in ghosts anymore, their task is even more difficult. Well, after ghost-busting the two ghouls that crash in on their trial hearing, we have no choice but to be ready to believe them. They're back in business, all right - with cynical Janine Melnitz (Annie Potts) answering the phones and Louis Tully (Moranis) on the books - tracing the source of their ghost-busting investigations to a 17th-century Moldavian tyrant named Vigo the Carpathian who wants in on the 20th century, and has possessed museum curator Janosz Poha (a hilarious Peter MacNicol) to go out and kidnap Dana's son so he can have a body so he can live again.

One thing "Ghostbusters II" provides for the viewer is solid entertainment, which is what any good sequel should do. It would be impossible for this movie to any way live up to the original, so you can't blame the filmmakers for at least trying (trying is italicized). It would be pointless to say that the acting is good from our players, but my God, they're good and again in top form. The special effects are still pretty impressive, even from their early ghost-busting capers, to a finale where the boys are actually able to walk down the streets of the city in an animated - yes, animated! - Statue of Liberty (yes, Lady Liberty has sprung to life, and good thing she's on our side!). And even the R.M.S. Titanic (don't ask, just watch) pops up too.

"Ghostbusters II" hasn't been particularly well-received, even despite its more family-friendly tone and message about the folly of mean-spiritedness. But it's just a good sequel, nonetheless, not bad, not superior to the original, maybe on par with the original, but it's just really good fun.

8/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 June 1989 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Ghostbusters II: River of Slime See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$37,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$29,472,894, 18 June 1989

Gross USA:

$112,494,738

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$215,394,738
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Columbia Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby SR | Dolby Stereo (Germany, 35 mm prints)| Dolby Atmos (Blu-ray release)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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