8.2/10
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34 user 67 critic

For All Mankind (1989)

Not Rated | | Documentary, History | 19 May 1989 (USA)
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1:02 | Clip
An in-depth look at various NASA moon landing missions, starting with Apollo 8.

Director:

Al Reinert
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 3 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Jim Lovell ... Narrator - Apollo 8, Apollo 13 (voice) (as James A. Lovell Jr.)
Russell Schweickart Russell Schweickart ... Narrator - Apollo 9 (voice) (as Russell L. Schweickart)
Eugene Cernan ... Narrator - Apollo 10, Apollo 17 (voice) (as Eugene A. Cernan)
Michael Collins ... Narrator - Apollo 11 (voice)
Charles Conrad Charles Conrad ... Narrator - Apollo 12 (voice) (as Charles P. Conrad Jr.)
Richard Gordon ... Narrator - Apollo 12 (voice) (as Richard F. Gordon Jr.)
Alan Bean Alan Bean ... Narrator - Apollo 12 (voice) (as Alan L. Bean)
Jack Swigert ... Narrator - Apollo 13 (voice) (as John L. Swigert Jr.)
Stuart Roosa Stuart Roosa ... Narrator - Apollo 14 (voice) (as Stuart A. Roosa)
James Irwin James Irwin ... Narrator - Apollo 15 (voice) (as James B. Irwin)
Ken Mattingly Ken Mattingly ... Narrator - Apollo 16 (voice) (as T. Kenneth Mattingly II)
Charles Duke ... Narrator - Apollo 16 (voice) (as Charles M. Duke Jr.)
Harrison Schmitt ... Narrator - Apollo 17 (voice) (as Harrison H. Schmitt)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Buzz Aldrin ... Self (archive footage)
Bill Anders ... Self (archive footage)
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Storyline

This movie documents the Apollo missions perhaps the most definitively of any movie under two hours. Al Reinert watched all the footage shot during the missions--over 6,000,000 feet of it, and picked out the best. Instead of being a newsy, fact-filled documentary, Reinart focuses on the human aspects of the space flights. The only voices heard in the film are the voices of the astronauts and mission control. Reinart uses the astronaunts' own words from interviews and mission footage. The score by Brian Eno underscores the strangeness, wonder, and beauty of the astronauts' experiences which they were privileged to have for a first time "for all mankind." Written by Scott B. Fisher <sbfisher@burgoyne.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

From 1968 til 1972, twenty-four human beings went to the moon. Their journey lives as the ultimate adventure story.


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

There is a shot of the moon appearing in the window of the capsule. Director Al Reinert says there was no shot available of the moon showing in the window of the command module, so a film crew went down to the Johnson Space Center, pasted a photo of the moon on a hatch cover at the museum, and filmed it to illustrate astronaut Ken Mattingly's description of what he saw in his flight. See more »

Goofs

When showing the scenes of trans-lunar injection (firing the rocket to leave earth orbit for the moon), scenes of a Gemini spacecraft reentering the atmosphere are shown instead. See more »

Quotes

T. Kenneth Mattingly II: I had the only window at this point, and I looked out, and doggone if the moon wasn't visible in the daylight right straight out the top of the window. I know they're doin' their job right because the moon's right straight ahead and that's where we're pointed and they're gonna launch us right straight to this thing.
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Crazy Credits

This film is dedicated to the men and women who have given their lives in the exploration of Space. Apollo 1 January 27, 1967 Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom Edward H. White II Roger B. Chaffee Soyuz 1 April 24, 1967 Vladimir Komarov Soyuz 11 June 30, 1971 Vladislav Volkov Georgi Dobrovolski Viktor Patsayev Challenger January 28, 1986 Michael J. Smith Dick Scobee Ronald McNair Ellison Onizuka Christa McAuliffe Gregory Jarvis Judith Resnik See more »


Soundtracks

Also Sprake Zarathustra
Performed by Lee DeCarlo and Peter Manning Robinson
Written by Richard Strauss
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User Reviews

Our Promise to Jack
2 March 2008 | by tedgSee all my reviews

This was effective for this viewer. Usually what that means in cases like this is that it made me cry.

The hook is that it reviews its subject through the eyes of the astronauts. I was wary of this. I got involved in the program later, during the beginning of the shuttle era and even then the astronauts were pretty much there only to have been taken there. They were chosen — some of them — for how good they looked on newsprint.

The magic of the program and its heroes were a few visionaries and an army of competent engineers.

Yet it was effective because we see the story through the eyes of witnesses. There role here is simply as witness, and if you were alive during this time, you will be impressed at how it affects you.

There were all sorts of paths that could have been followed in this. The quest of man to explore; the mysteries of the unknown; the vast game being played by two enemies to demonstrate superiority of ideology; the hidden weapons programs.

They cover all these slightly except that last, and that's excusable because these witnesses saw none of that. But the story that dominates is the Kennedy one. Its hard to imagine today, but we loved our president and he deserved it. He was intelligent and articulate. His advisers came off not as louts or bullies, but men (and a few women) smart enough for difficult times. He was the Peace Corps president.

Kennedy promised to go to the moon and return without consulting anyone at NASA, and riding on the crest of a national enthusiasm for science and hardware. The nation really was engaged. And then he was killed, and with our rising self-doubt (Vietnam, race) we decided that as a people we owed it to him, or what he stood for. So when it happened, and the world watched, re affirmed the man and what he stood for. It was a good feeling, not pride as much as wonder about who we discovered ourselves to be.

This will evoke that same feeling again, the original tears, followed by tears of disappointment at the massive collapse of esteem which followed. A serious of botched opportunities to be worthy of the accomplishment.

Its an effective documentary in that regard, all the more so since everything was designed to be photographed, and was. If you really want to learn of this program, you need to go elsewhere, But this delivers on the promise.

Ted's Evaluation -- 3 of 3: Worth watching.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 May 1989 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

For All Mankind See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$33,777, 5 November 1989

Gross USA:

$770,132

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$770,132
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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