Screen Two (1985–2002)
5.6/10
128
1 user 1 critic

Fellow Traveller 

In Hollywood during the 1950's, screenwriter Asa Kaufman reflects on his Communist associations and knows that he will soon be forced to testify before committees investigating "Un-American... See full summary »

Director:

Philip Saville

Writer:

Michael Eaton
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Ron Silver ... Asa Kaufman
Hart Bochner ... Clifford Byrne
Imogen Stubbs ... Sarah Atchison
Daniel J. Travanti ... Jerry Leavy
Katherine Borowitz ... Joan Kaufman
Jonathan Hyde ... Sheriff of Nottingham (Robin Hood cast)
Alexander Hanson Alexander Hanson ... Robin Hood (Robin Hood cast)
John Labanowski John Labanowski ... Little John (Robin Hood cast)
Peter Corey Peter Corey ... Friar Tuck (Robin Hood cast)
Briony McRoberts Briony McRoberts ... Maid Marian (Robin Hood cast)
Julian Fellowes ... D'Arcy
Richard Wilson ... Sir Hugo Armstrong
Doreen Mantle ... Landlady
David O'Hara ... Ronnie Wilson
Allan Mitchell Allan Mitchell ... Ted Sturton
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Storyline

In Hollywood during the 1950's, screenwriter Asa Kaufman reflects on his Communist associations and knows that he will soon be forced to testify before committees investigating "Un-American" activities. He can no longer find employment in Hollywood anyway, so decides to flee to England and get work there writing children's TV. Soon after arriving, he hears that his best friend since childhood, actor Clifford Byrne, has committed suicide. Asa is sure that this is related to the witch-hunts, and has to find out exactly what the relation is. Written by Anonymous

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Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 February 1991 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color
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Did You Know?

Connections

References The Adventures of Robin Hood (1955) See more »

Soundtracks

Begin the Beguine
(uncredited)
Written by Cole Porter
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User Reviews

A more complete depiction of the period and the pressures on artists than ever before seen
28 January 2001 | by walterlxSee all my reviews

Seeing adult reactions through the eyes of a child left many unexplained mysteries of the McCarthy era. Friends who grew up in the shadow of the Hollywood blacklist in Los Angeles say that in spite of its flaws, FELLOW TRAVELER provided a perspective they themselves couldn't see at that time.

The movie's only weaknesses were its awkward transitions between time periods and the uneven sound track (sometimes too loud, sometimes too soft) which distracted from the narrative flow. The story itself was told in an honest and well-balanced manner giving both the position of those passionate left-wing activists along with the approaches of the people whose direction they followed.

As a made-for TV movie, FELLOW TRAVELER was probably not widely viewed. I'd strongly recommend it be sought out as a video rental or in bargain bins for anyone seeking a good dramatic portrayal of that tragic but intense period.


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