The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988) - News Poster

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The UnPopular Opinion: The Fall

  • JoBlo
The Unpopular Opinion is an ongoing column featuring different takes on films that either the writer Hated, but that the majority of film fans Loved, or that the writer Loved, but that most others Loathed. We're hoping this column will promote constructive and geek fueled discussion. Enjoy! ****Some Spoilers Ensue**** One of my all-time favorite films is The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen.... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Jabberwocky

Jabberwocky

Blu-ray

Criterion

1977/ 1:85 / 105 Min. / Street Date November 21, 2017

Starring Michael Palin, Harry H. Corbett, John Le Mesurier

Cinematography by Terry Bedford

Written by Charles Alverson, Terry Gilliam

Music by Hector Berlioz, Modest Mussorgsky

Edited by Michael Bradsell

Produced by Sanford Lieberson

Directed by Terry Gilliam

The prospect of Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky directed by Monty Python’s Terry Gilliam promised a brave new world of sophisticated nonsense; The Mad Hatter meets the Ministry of Silly Walks.

Equally appetizing was the thought of illustrator John Tenniel’s hideous creature brought to life by Gilliam, the Python’s premiere visual satirist. But Gilliam, working in a chaotic British climate that saw Harold Wilson being upstaged by the Sex Pistols, had other ideas, exemplified by the film’s title sequence which rolls by over some of Pieter Bruegel’s most unnerving canvasses.

The Dutch artist was no Pollyanna (his most famous painting was
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

A Letter To Rian Johnson

It feels a little bit like Christmas morning around the house this morning, even though we’ve still got a week and change to go before the actual day, and that’s undoubtedly because all the women here are rousing themselves a bit early to get ready for what amounts to Christmas 2017, Hollywood style. (The cats have been up for some time already, and they too are very excited, but you know, that’s just their way.) You see, in a couple hours we’re all piling into the car and making the pilgrimage up the hill to Universal City to see Star Wars: The Last Jedi. When it comes to buying advance tickets for a big movie for the whole family to see together my dear wife knows no restraints, and if the movie is prefixed with the words “Star Wars,” then all bets are most assuredly off.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Comfort and Joy

You never heard of the Great Glasgow Ice Cream Wars? They weren’t exactly Armageddon, and the gentle director Bill Forsyth makes a radio personality’s involvement with two competing ice cream companies more of a plunge into amiable drollery. If you like Gregory’s Girl and Local Hero you’ll understand the odd, unhurried attitude of this oddball show from 1984.

Comfort and Joy

Region B Blu-ray

Studiocanal

1984 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date February 29, 2016 / At Amazon UK / £ 9.99

Starring: Bill Patterson, C.P. Grogan, Eleanor David, Alex Norton, Patrick Malahide.

Cinematography: Chris Menges

Film Editor: Michael Ellis

Original Music: Mark Knopfler

Produced by Davina Belling, Clive Parsons

Written and Directed by Bill Forsyth

Quick, name some great filmmakers before the 1990s that hail from Scotland. Actually, there are plenty, it’s just that most made their careers and reputations in London, and some later in Hollywood. The home-grown talent Bill Forsyth
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Karlovy Vary Film Festival Honors Talent Working in Front of and Behind the Camera

Karlovy Vary Film Festival Honors Talent Working in Front of and Behind the Camera
Casey Affleck

President’s Award

An Academy Award-winner for his role in “Manchester by the Sea” (2016), Affleck will receive his kudo prior to a screening of “A Ghost Story,” in which he stars. Affleck, along with helmer-writer David Lowery, will introduce the film. Affleck starred in Lowery’s debut film “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” (2013) and recently completed production on Lowery’s “The Old Man and the Gun.”

Like his older brother, multi-hyphenate Ben, Casey Affleck has a parallel career as a writer-producer-director. He is in post on his second feature as a helmer-writer, “The Light of My Life,” in which he also stars.

Related

Future Frames Showcase at Karlovy Vary Casts the Spotlight on Promising Creative Talent

James Newton Howard

Crystal Globe

American composer and songwriter Howard will conduct the Czech National Symphony Orchestra in a performance of his music for the film “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” in front of Hotel Thermal on June 30, during the fest’s opening. Howard is currently preparing for his first live concert tour, a celebration of career highlights, with music, spoken word and video, that will visit 20 European cities.

Howard has composed music for more than 120 films, including Academy Award-nominated scores for “Defiance,” “Michael Clayton,” “The Village,” “The Fugitive,” “The Prince of Tides” and “My Best Friend’s Wedding” — not to mention Oscar-nominated songs for “Junior” and “One Fine Day.”

In addition to his contributions to film and television music, the Emmy- and Grammy-winning Howard has also composed concert pieces for the Pacific Symphony.

Paul Laverty

Crystal Globe

Laverty wrote the scripts for 12 features and two short films directed by Ken Loach, beginning with “Carla’s Song” (1996). Their most recent collaboration, “I, Daniel Blake” (2016), won the Palme d’Or at Cannes.

Laverty wrote the screenplay for Loach’s first Palme d’Or winner, “The Wind That Shakes the Barley” (2006). His credits with Loach include “My Name Is Joe,” (1998), a Cannes lead actor-winner for Peter Mullan and Cannes screenplay winner “Sweet Sixteen” (2002).

He also writes screenplays for his partner, the Spanish director and actress Icíar Bollaín.

Ken Loach

Crystal Globe

An activist as well as one of Britain’s most celebrated directors, Loach worked briefly in theater before starting as a director for BBC television in the early 1960s. There, he helmed ground-breaking dramas such as “Up the Junction” and “Cathy Come Home.” The impact of the latter led to a change in Britain’s homeless laws. Acclaimed early features such as “Poor Cow” (1967) and “Kes” (1969) brought his trademarks of social realism and compassion to the big screen.

Even though Loach’s 50-plus-year career includes a dark period when he couldn’t get a project off the ground and he directed commercials to support his family, he has been extraordinarily prolific. Undoubtedly, this is due in part to his on-going collaboration with producer Rebecca O’Brien and long-term partnerships with screenwriters including Barry Hines, Jim Allen and perhaps most fruitfully, Paul Laverty. Loach is also known for introducing exciting new acting talents.

Jeremy Renner

President’s Award

Actor, producer, musician and two-time Oscar-nominee Renner will receive his kudo at the fest’s closing gala on July 8. Renner will also introduce the crime thriller “Wind River,” directed by Taylor Sheridan.

Known for his intensity and ability to fully embody the characters he portrays, Renner received early critical acclaim as a serial killer in “Dahmer” (2002). He later established himself through roles in action and war movies, garnering an Oscar nomination for lead actor in Kathryn Bigelow’s war tale “The Hurt Locker” (2008). A supporting actor nom followed two years later for Ben Affleck’s bank heist drama “The Town” (2010).

Renner’s extensive filmography balances big-budget blockbusters such as “The Avengers” and “Mission: Impossible” series with more complex roles in “American Hustle” and “Arrival.”

In 2012, he formed the production company The Combine, with partner Don Handfield, to create, develop and produce high-quality, character-driven content for mainstream audiences.

Uma Thurman

President’s Award

The sensual, statuesque American actress and producer Uma Thurman will receive her honor on June 30, during the fest’s opening night. An Oscar-nominee for Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” (1994), Thurman’s memorable acting career is notable for her collaboration with iconic helmers.

Thurman was only a teenager when she made an impact in Stephen Frears’ “Dangerous Liaisons” (1988) and Terry Gilliam’s surreal “The Adventures of Baron Munchausen” (1988). However, the part of Mia Wallace in Tarantino’s sensational “Pulp Fiction” marked a turning point, garnering her numerous awards and nominations. Another successful Tarantino collaboration followed nearly a decade later with the cult double-header: “Kill Bill: Vols. 1 and 2” (2003, 2004). She received two Golden Globe nominations for her role as The Bride.

Thurman ultimately nabbed a Golden Globe for for her role in Mira Nair’s made-for-tv feature “Hysterical Blindness” (2002). She produced “The Accidental Husband” (2008) and the forthcoming “Girl Soldier.”

Václav Vorlíček

President’s Award

Renowned for his work for younger audiences, director-writer Vorlíček, 87, will receive an honor for his artistic contribution to Czech film.

Vorlíček teamed with writer and director Miloš Macourek, to form an original creative partnership responsible for a distinctive chapter in the development of Czech film. Their poetic vision, in which real life comes up against elements of fantasy, remains unique to this day.

Prime examples of Vorlíček and Macourek’s work include the “comic book” comedy “Who Wants to Kill Jessie?” (1966); the sci-fi comedy “You Are a Widow, Sir!” (1970).

Another comedy that employs fairytale motifs in contemporary Prague titled “How to Drown Dr. Mracek, the Lawyer” (1974); the TV series “Arabela” (1979-80); and “Rumburak” (1985).

Vorlíček is also known for his fairytale films, especially the comedy “The Girl on the Broomstick” (1971) and “Three Wishes for Cinderella” (1973), now a perennially popular Christmas classic on Czech television.

Related storiesFuture Frames Showcase at Karlovy Vary Casts the Spotlight on Promising Creative TalentKarlovy Vary International Film Festival Celebrates Critics Choice MoviesKarlovy Vary International Film Festival Showcases Stories of Social Turmoil
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Horror Highlights: Comet TV’s May Viewing Guide, El Gigante: The Comic, Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl

Comet TV has plenty for horror, sci-fi, and fantasy fans to enjoy with their May lineup, including Jim Henson's Labyrinth. In today's Horror Highlights, we also have artwork and details on El Gigante: The Comic and streaming info for Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl, which is now available to watch on Shudder.

Comet TV May Viewing Guide: Press Release: "You Don’T Need A Subscription To Watch These Great Movies

They’Re Airing For Free On Comet!

Ray Harryhausen Films – Airing all Month

The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958)

Sunday May 7 at 11:30Am/10:30C

Friday May 12 at 4P/3C

Monday May 22 at 6P/5C

The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973)

Sunday May 7 at 1:30Pm/12:30C

Saturday May 27 at 10P/9C

The 3 Worlds of Gulliver (1960)

Sunday May 7 at 4P/3C

Friday May 26 at 10P/9C

Jason and The Argonauts (1963)

Sunday May 7 at 6P/5C

Friday May 12 at 6P
See full article at DailyDead »

Cannes 2017: Uma Thurman Set to Preside Over Un Certain Regard Jury

Cannes 2017: Uma Thurman Set to Preside Over Un Certain Regard Jury
This year’s Cannes Film Festival has announced their pick for President of their Un Certain Regard jury — Cannes regular and American icon, actress Uma Thurman.

Per an official statement from the festival, “In a career spanning more than 20 years, the American actress has made some daring choices and enjoyed taking risks. She made her debut aged 17, in Stephen Frears’ ‘Dangerous Liaisons’ and in Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Adventures of Baron Munchausen.’ She became Quentin Tarantino’s muse, playing in ‘Pulp Fiction’ (Palme d’or winner, 1994) and in ‘Kill Bill’ (volumes 1 & 2), both presented at the Festival de Cannes. Since then, Uma Thurman has worked with many directors, including Andrew Niccol (‘Gattaca’); Woody Allen (‘Sweet and Lowdown’); Roland Joffé (‘Vatel’) and Ethan Hawke (‘Chelsea Walls’). She recently joined the cast of Lars von Trier’s new project, ‘The House that Jack Built,’ alongside Matt Dillon and Bruno Ganz.”

Read More: 17 Shocks
See full article at Indiewire »

Uma Thurman will preside over Un Certain Regard jury at Cannes 2017

The organisers of this year’s Cannes Film Festival, which kicks off on May 17th in the south of France, have announced that Uma Thurman will preside over the Un Certain Regard jury the 70th festival.

In a career spanning more than 20 years, the American actress has made some daring choices and enjoyed taking risks. She made her debut aged 17, in Stephen FrearsDangerous Liaisons and in Terry Gilliam’s The Adventures of Baron Munchausen. She became Quentin Tarantino’s muse, playing in Pulp Fiction (Palme d’or winner, 1994) and in Kill Bill (volumes 1 & 2), both presented at the Festival de Cannes.

Since then, Uma Thurman has worked with many directors, including Andrew Niccol (Gattaca); Woody Allen (Sweet and Lowdown); Roland Joffé (Vatel) and Ethan Hawke (Chelsea Walls). She recently joined the cast of Lars von Trier’s new project, The House that Jack Built, alongside Matt Dillon and Bruno Ganz.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

John Cleese to Star in ‘Edith,’ First BBC Sitcom Since ‘Fawlty Towers’

  • The Wrap
John Cleese to Star in ‘Edith,’ First BBC Sitcom Since ‘Fawlty Towers’
British comedy legend John Cleese is returning to the small screen in his first BBC sitcom since “Fawlty Towers,” the network announced Tuesday. Cleese will co-star along with Alison Steadman (“Orphan Black,” “The Adventures of Baron Munchausen”) in “Edith,” a six-part comedy series created and written by Oscar-nominated screenwriter Charles McKeown (“Brazil”). Cleese and Steadman previously played husband and wife in the 1986 film “Clockwise.” The series follows a widow — named Edith, of course — whose life is put on hold after her son hits rock bottom and moves back in with her. Cleese will play Phil, an old boyfriend and neighbor of.
See full article at The Wrap »

80s fantasy movie moments that terrified us as kids

Ryan Lambie Mar 22, 2017

Fearsome monsters, grasping hands, and a suggestive tree. Here are 10 fantasy movie moments that scarred us as kids...

Sooner or later, you're going to see a scary movie. Whether you sneak down and watch a horror film on late night television, watch a Nightmare On Elm Street sequel round a friend's house or watch clips of slasher movies on YouTube, horror movies are always out there, waiting in the wings for the young and curious.

See related The Last Kingdom series 2 episode 1 review The Last Kingdom series 2: politics, battles and arselings What can we expect from new BBC drama, The Last Kingdom?

But long before most of us graduate to the stage of our lives where we start seeking out 18-rated movies of gore and terror, we reliably encounter scary moments in what might initially seem to be harmless family adventure films.

The 1980s was an
See full article at Den of Geek »

Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote begins production (yes, really)

17 years after the plug was pulled on his first attempt, Terry Gilliam has now commenced production on his passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, IndieWire is reporting.

As announced last year (when the project was delayed once again), Star Wars: The Force Awakens star Adam Driver is set to take on the lead role originally portrayed by Johnny Depp in the abandoned 2000 version. However, it seems that Gilliam regular Jonathan Pryce (Brazil, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen) will now take on the role of Quixote, replacing Michael Palin (who himself replaced John Hurt, Robert Duvall and Jean Rochefort).

Joining Driver and Pryce in the cast are Olga Kurylenko (Quantum of Solace), Stellan Skarsgård (Avengers: Age of Ultron), Joana Ribeiro (A Uma Hora Incerta), Eva Basteiro-Bertoli (Black Bread) and Rossy de Palma (Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown).

Here’s the official synopsis for the project,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

It's a Miracle! Terry Gilliam Has Started Shooting The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Director Terry Gilliam has been trying to get his film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote made for the past 17 years. Today, he's once again started shooting the film, and hopefully this time it isn't plagued by problems like the first time, which was chronicled in the classic documentary Lost in La Mancha. This is the filmmaker's seventh attempt to make the film!

Last year it was announced that Adam Driver (The Force Awakens) would be taking on the lead role that was originally played by Johnny Depp. Over the years, both Jack O'Connell and Ewan McGregor were attached to the role.

Jonathan Pryce (Brazil, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, The Brothers Grimm) is set to play Miguel de Cervantes, the hero of the story. That role previously had Michael Palin, Robert Duvall, Jean Rochefort, and the late John Hurt attached to it.

The movie also stars Olga Kurylenko (Quantum of Solace
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Latest Movies Reviews and Our Personal Thoughts

7. Inglourious Basterds – Release Date: June 2009

Quentin Tarantino has the ability to evoke passion from audiences. Love him or call him a hack that repeatably steals the visions of other directors for his gain, this auteur has a style all his own…. In his first movie since 2003/2004’s Kill Bill, Tarantino heads to Germany. Nazi Germany.

Starring Brad Pitt, Diane Kruger, Samm Levine, and Mike Myers (yes, that Mike Myers), Tarantino’s upcoming World War II movie centers on a group of Jewish-American soldiers who scalp and barbarously slaughter Nazis. If that doesn’t say “fun”, I’m not sure what does.

8. Sherlock Holmes – Release Date: November 20, 2009

Coming off two brilliant performances in Iron Man and Tropic Thunder, Robert Downey Jr. will be Sherlock Holmes next Thanksgiving. From director Guy Ritchie (Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, Snatch), the legendary detective and his faithful partner Watson (played by Jude Law) must
See full article at Reel Loop »

12 expensive and eccentric modern Hollywood movies

Ryan Lambie Jul 26, 2016

They cost millions and they’re very, very odd. We take a look at 12 expensive and eccentric Hollywood films from the past 40 years...

The risk-averse nature of filmmaking means that the world’s more maverick and outrageous writers and directors have to make do with relatively low budgets. Nicolas Winding Refn drenched the screen in all kinds of sordid, violent and startling imagery in such films as Only God Forgives and this year’s The Neon Demon, but the combined budget of those probably didn’t even match the catering budget for something like Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice.

Every so often, though, a truly bonkers film slips through the Hollywood studio system - often by accident. From horror sequels to original sci-fi adventures, here are 12 incredibly expensive and gloriously eccentric Hollywood movies from the past 40 years.

The Exorcist II (1977)

Budget: $14 million

Like most films made for purely financial reasons,
See full article at Den of Geek »

A celebration of disembodied brains and heads in the movies

Ryan Lambie Jul 14, 2016

We take a look at some of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

Nb: The following contains spoilers for The Brain From The Planet Arous and Prometheus.

For some reason we've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. Note that we’re not talking about decapitations here - though goodness knows that cinema is home to plenty of those, from Japanese samurai epics to modern slasher horrors.

No, we’re talking about movies where heads and brains remain sentient even when they’re stuffed into jars or colossal things made of stone. Sometimes used for comedic effect, at other times for shock value, they’re a surprisingly common phenomenon in the movies. Here, we celebrate a few of our absolute favourites - though you’re sure
See full article at Den of Geek »

The View From Central Park: Close-Up on Terry Gilliam's "The Fisher King"

Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Terry Gilliam's The Fisher King (1991) is playing from June 1 - June 30, 2016 in the UK.In an overview of the accomplished, fraught, tumultuous career of Terry Gilliam, The Fisher King (1991) can look like not just an artistic turning point, but an economic one. Gilliam had just finished a loose trilogy of comic fantasies—Time Bandits (1981), Brazil (1985), and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988)—each visually baroque and laced with a kind of surreal, dark, absurdist humor that marked them as a natural extension of his time as the lone American in Monty Python. Time Bandits was a head-turning left-field hit, and Brazil, the subject of a legendary battle with Universal over final cut, is often cited as Gilliam's masterpiece. But Munchausen, though held dear by a cult following, was a blow to Gilliam's career. It went quickly over-budget (wildly so,
See full article at MUBI »

8 Movies Critics Loved That Audiences Pretty Much Igonored

A couple of weeks ago I looked at the movies that were big box office successes even though critics universally destroyed them. Today, we.re going to take a look at the other side of the coin. Sometimes there are great movies which are unable to find financial success, regardless of how great they actually are. Most of the time fans and critics are in some degree of agreement. Good movies get seen and make money, bad movies do not. However, sometimes the term "bomb" really only reflects a film.s box office success and not its quality. Here are eight box office bombs that critics actually thought were good movies. Note: We are focusing on their domestic numbers, and acknowledge that some of these films found a way to make up their numbers are the international box office. The Adventures of Baron Munchausen Budget: $46 million Domestic Box Office: $8 million
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Watch: Film Imitates Art In This Beautiful Supercut

Art imitates life, life imitates art, and film imitates everything in between. For ages, filmmakers, screenwriters, and set designers have drawn inspiration from other mediums, visiting museums and spending hours looking through books to seek the perfect aesthetic to draw upon. Read More: Listen: Michael Mann Talks Changes To 'Blackhat,' 'Last Of The Mohicans' & Possible Sci-Fi Project In 1-Hour Talk Periods from the early Renaissance to realism, Fauvism, post-impressionism, and more, have ignited ideas for a film (or a specific scene), and this new video from Vugar Efendi documents just that. Beginning with Ridley Scott’s “The Duelists,” Efendi gives examples of scenes from some of the greatest films of the past hundred years, juxtaposing the painting they were inspired by. Botticelli’s "Birth of Venus" sits side-by-side with a stunning young Uma Thurman in Terry Gilliam’s often-underrated “The Adventures of Baron Munchausen,” and Quentin Tarantino’s.
See full article at The Playlist »

Post-‘Monty Python,’ Terry Gilliam Keeps Delivering Something Completely Different

Post-‘Monty Python,’ Terry Gilliam Keeps Delivering Something Completely Different
Terry Gilliam, despite turning 75 this month and recently publishing “Gilliamesque: A Pre-posthumous Memoir,” has no intention of seeing the curtain fall on his career. He fizzes with ideas as he sits for an interview with Variety at the British Film Institute cafe in London, dressed in a samue — a traditional Japanese jacket worn by monks and craftsmen. He jokes that the fusion of the two reflects his approach to his trade.

When it’s time to move to the location of the photo shoot across town in Covent Garden, he spurns the offer of a taxi, preferring to walk.

The determination in his brisk gait is mirrored in his creative pursuits. Though his doomed attempt to shoot “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” documented in the film “Lost in La Mancha,” took its toll on Gilliam, he has not given up on the project. Amazon is backing a revived version of the film,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

12 Things We Learned From Terry Gilliam's Wild Memoir

12 Things We Learned From Terry Gilliam's Wild Memoir
Over the past half-century, Terry Gilliam has lived several lifetimes — first as the mastermind behind the surrealistically satirical animations on Monty Python's Flying Circus and then as a filmmaker with an unparalleled, singular imagination. His oeuvre contains everything from literary flights of fancy (Jabberwocky) and kid-friendly fantasies (Time Bandits) to dystopian epics (Brazil and Twelve Monkeys), kaleidoscopic romps (The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) and the occasional slightly warped drama (The Fisher King, Tideland).

Now 74, Gilliam looks back on his life achievements, as well as
See full article at Rolling Stone »
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