The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988) - News Poster

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NYC Weekend Watch: Raúl Ruiz, ‘The Heartbreak Kid,’ Alex Ross Perry, ‘Catwoman’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

A retrospective of the great, perpetually underseen Raúl Ruiz winds down its second part.

Anthology Film Archives

Films by Elaine May, Albert Brooks, Pialat, and Zulowski play in “Valentine’s Day Massacre.”

Erich von Stroheim’s Greed will play on Saturday and Sunday.

Metrograph

Retrospectives Alex Ross Perry and St.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Oscars flashback: Daniel Day-Lewis (‘My Left Foot’) receives 1st Best Actor from swooning Jodie Foster [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Daniel Day-Lewis (‘My Left Foot’) receives 1st Best Actor from swooning Jodie Foster [Watch]
Jodie Foster could hardly hold back her feelings when announcing the Best Actor winner at the 1990 Oscars ceremony. Watch above as she swoons in saying the name of Daniel Day-Lewis for “My Left Foot,” his first ever victory at the Academy Awards.

In the 1980s, Day-Lewis was a young actor known mostly for British stage work and television, but he was building a reputation as an immersive method actor. He had received good notices for his performances in “A Room with a View,” as the wealthy suitor of Helena Bonham Carter, and as a romantic Czech doctor in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being.”

SEEDaniel Day-Lewis movies: Top 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

In 1988 he was offered a screenplay based on the memoirs of Christy Brown, an Irish poet and painter born with cerebral palsy. When he read the opening scene where Christy puts on a record using only his left foot,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Juliette Binoche to Get Lifetime Achievement Honor at Goteborg Festival

Juliette Binoche to Get Lifetime Achievement Honor at Goteborg Festival
French actress Juliette Binoche will receive the lifetime achievement honor of the Goteborg Film Festival, the honorary Dragon Award.

Binoche, who has been a fixture on the European and Hollywood scene for decades, has appeared in more than 70 films, among them The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Three Colors: Blue and The English Patient, the latter winning her an Academy Award for best supporting actress.

Announcing the honor, Goteborg's artistic director Jonas Holmberg called Binoche “one of the most influential actors of our time,” whose “iconic performances...have helped shape modern European film history.”

Binoche will attend the Goteborg festival Feb....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Juliette Binoche to Receive Göteborg’s Honorary Dragon Award

Juliette Binoche to Receive Göteborg’s Honorary Dragon Award
French actress Juliette Binoche, who last starred in Claire Denis’ “Bright Sunshine In,” which won a prize at Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight and earned rave reviews, is set to receive the honorary Dragon Award at the Göteborg Film Festival.

Aside from receiving the award, Binoche will hold a master class and will take part in the festival’s celebration of Ingmar Bergman by selecting “Scenes From a Marriage” for a special retrospective.

Among the 70 films in which she starred, Binoche delivered critically acclaimed performances in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” “The English Patient,” “Three Colors: Blue” and “The Lovers on the Bridge.” Binoche is coming off a strong year, with her performance in “Bright Sunshine In” applauded by critics worldwide. She was nominated for a European Film Award and is vying for a Lumieres Award (France’s equivalent to the Golden Globes). She is also expected to be nominated for a Cesar Award.

“First I want
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Daniel Day-Lewis Made A Balenciaga Dress From Scratch To Prepare For ‘Phantom Thread’

Daniel Day-Lewis Made A Balenciaga Dress From Scratch To Prepare For ‘Phantom Thread’
Daniel Day-Lewis, with three Oscars already in the bag, retired from acting this past year, with his final role being another brilliant performance in Paul Thomas Anderson‘s “Phantom Thread.” The ultimate method actor, Day-Lewis is known for taking extreme measures to perfect a given role. He apprenticed with an actual butcher for his role as Bill “The Butcher” in “Gangs of New York“; he was fully in character, both on and off-screen, as Abraham Lincoln in “Lincoln“; he learned to build canoes, lived with Native Americans, learned to track and skin animals for his role in “The Last Of The Mohicans“; he refused to use his hands, only using his feet to complete daily tasks, for his role as cerebral palsy-inflicted, celebrated painter Christie Brown in “My Left Foot“; he learned to speak Czech for “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” oh, and lest we forget, he spent nights in jail,
See full article at The Playlist »

Mexico’s Machete, France’s Cine-Sud to Co-produce Federico Cecchetti’s Second Film (Exclusive)

Morelia, Mexico — Mexican producer-distributor Machete and France’s Cine-Sud Promotion are co-producing Mexican-Italian helmer Federico Cecchetti’s next feature, “Letters from the Land of the Tarahumara,” which Cecchetti developed at the Cannes Festival’s directors’ residence Cinefondation last year. Cecchetti’s debut feature “Mara’Akame’s Dream” (“El Sueno del Mara’Akame”) won the Best First Mexican Feature Prize at the Morelia Film Festival in 2016 and a Silver Ariel Award, Mexico’s Oscar equivalent, for Best First Film this year.

Described by Cecchetti as a “fantastic biography,” “Letters” traces the journey taken by French poet, actor and playwright Antonin Artaud in the Tarahumara sierra during the 1930s from the perspective of a young Tarahumara Indian named Rayenari whose life is transformed upon meeting the Frenchman. Their encounter explores the enigmatic bond that exists between magic, poetry, art and madness.

Just as in “Mara’Akame’s Dream,” Cecchetti will be working with non-actors except for one French actor for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bosco Entertainment, Tita line up xenophobia satire

  • ScreenDaily
Bosco Entertainment, Tita line up xenophobia satire
Exclusive: Screenplay written by The Unbearable Lightness Of Being actor Laszlo Szabo.

La-based producer and Bosco Entertainment founder Julio Bove has attached former European Film Award nominee Jacques Malaterre to direct La Saison des Oursins, a satirical comedy about xenophobia.

Marseille-based Tita Productions is on board to produced alongside Bosco and the partners anticipate a spring or autumn 2018 shoot in the south of France ahead of delivery in 2019.

The project is based on a screenplay by Hungarian multi-hyphenate Laszlo Szabo, whose on-screen appearances include The Unbearable Lightness Of Being and Full Moon In Paris.

La Saison des Oursins is told through the eyes of a Jewish man in Marseille who receives a heart transplant and embarks on a quest to find the donor.

The older man eventually learns his new heart belonged to a promising French Arab teenage footballer who was the victim of a hit-and-run.

The man befriends the youngster’s mother and together they attempt
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Why Daniel Day-Lewis' Retirement Is a Major Loss to the Movies

Why Daniel Day-Lewis' Retirement Is a Major Loss to the Movies
Daniel Day-Lewis has earned many accolades and awards over the last 35 years, but perhaps no one has more perfectly encapsulated this actor's appeal than comedian Paul F. Tompkins. Cast in a tiny part in 2007's There Will Be Blood opposite Day-Lewis, the stand-up comic later related what their first on-set encounter was like. "Now, I had been told that Daniel Day-Lewis was kind of an intense person," Tompkins says. "And he's really not. He's really … The Most Intense Person that has ever lived on Earth. He's not doing anything – he's
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting: Here Are the Roles We’ll Treasure the Most

  • Indiewire
Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting: Here Are the Roles We’ll Treasure the Most
Daniel Day-Lewis dropped a bombshell on fans of his work worldwide when he announced that he would be retiring from acting, just a few months before the release of his purported last role, in Paul Thomas-Anderson’s upcoming “Phantom Thread.” One of the world’s most coveted actors has a surprisingly nimble filmography. Even as it stretches back to the early eighties, Day-Lewis didn’t become a big name until his breakout role in Stephen Frears’ 1985 “My Beautiful Laundrette,” followed by a series of acclaimed roles in “A Room With a View,” “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” and “My Left Foot,” which won him the first of three Academy Awards. The other Oscars arrived for back-to-back roles in “There Will Be Blood” and “Lincoln,” leaving no doubt that the versatile performer was still at the top of his game.

See MoreDaniel Day-Lewis Announces He Is Retiring From Acting

But these highlights are only a few of the astonishing achievements in the actor’s robust output. Here are the ones we’ll treasure for all time, while holding out hope that this legendary talent’s final performance will land a spot as well.

A Room With a View

It was one of his very last supporting roles, but Daniel Day-Lewis was the embodiment of Cecil Vyse in Merchant Ivory’s 1986 adaptation of E.M. Forster’s “A Room With a View.” In lesser hands, Lucy Honeychurch’s jilted suitor might have been little more than a prissy sad sack; Day-Lewis invested the character with empathy, as if Cecil knew his reach exceeded his grasp. While Lucy may have viewed their match as a prison narrowly escaped, Day-Lewis’ performance suggested a man who couldn’t get beyond his own pince-nez, but loved her so much that he let her go. —Dana Harris

The Age of Innocence” The emotions in Day-Lewis’s character are often big and ever present. But the performances that best showcase his talent are when he plays a more genteel character – his manner poised, cadence deliberate, body at rest. Yet in playing Newland Archer in Edith Wharton’s rigid 19th Century high society, he is effortless in accessing the desperate yearning that lies beneath his impossibly calm demeanor. His ability to translate complex thoughts, burning emotions and his character’s interior life through a completely placid surface is a marvel. —Chris O’Falt “Gangs of New York

There’s a titanic force lurking under each of Day-Lewis’ roles, but nowhere was that energy unleashed better than in Martin Scorsese’s 2002 city-spanning epic “Gangs of New York.” Bill the Butcher combined the actor’s ferocity with an unbridled villainous streak, an antagonist as evil as he is charming. Day-Lewis has always excelled in quiet roles, but Bill is a reminder that his flair for the theatrical is rarely equalled. Watching Bill play to an audience inside a rowdy theater or to a gathered crowd of terrified citizens, there’s a twisted thrill in seeing a true performer playing a true performer. —Steve Greene

The Last of the Mohicans” Arguably the actor’s most dreamy, overtly romantic role, Day-Lewis’ turn in Michael Mann’s 1992 historical action-adventure is both totally swoon-worthy and emotionally satisfying. As the adopted son of the eponymous last of the Mohican tribe, Day-Lewis plays his Hawkeye as a hero in the most classic sense, but aided by the actor’s formidable chops, the role (and the film) take on added dimension and complexity. Mann’s film is a heart-pounding adventure that doesn’t skimp on the tough stuff (people are scalped and burnt alive and commit suicide in order to escape worse fates, and that’s just the wide strokes), and it’s grounded by Day-Lewis’ trademark dedication and sincerity to the essential beats of his characters. Slipping easily between breakneck adventure (few movies contain so many scenes of artful running through the woods as “Mohicans”) and dreamy leading man (his chemistry with Madeleine Stowe all but aches right off the screen), turning in one of his more overlooked performances in a long line of lauded roles. It’s a film, and a part, that satisfies even more than two decades later. —Kate Erbland “Lincoln”

Day-Lewis won this third Best Actor Oscar — more than any actor in history — for playing the title role in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” because the movie is unimaginable without him. It took years for Spielberg to convince the recalcitrant Brit to play the American icon. Always willing to wait years between cherry-picked roles, replenishing his batteries by reengaging with the world, Day-Lewis finally broke down after Tony Kushner’s sprawling script focused on January 1865, when Lincoln maneuvered Congress into passing the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which ended slavery in America. “The important thing is they got Lincoln,” Lincoln biographer Doris Kearns Goodwin told me at the L.A. premiere, “his stooped walk, his high-pitched voice, his humor.”

Day-Lewis is a draw for moviegoers because when the match is perfect between director and role, when it feels right, he gives his all. He embraces a role so totally that it consumes and overtakes him. He loses himself in the part throughout production. As usual, Day-Lewis’s preparation was intense. He worked in seclusion until he sent Spielberg tape recorder audio of his approximation of the 16h president’s reedy tenor. He nailed his first scene on-set, an eight-minute speech about the Emancipation Proclamation, on the first take with no on-set rehearsal. Day-Lewis stayed in character throughout the shoot, addressed by all as “Mr. President.” No socializing on set saves energy, Day-Lewis has said. It’s fair to say that Day-Lewis is Abraham Lincoln, and the people went to see it because the actor was in it. —Anne Thompson

My Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown

Jim Sheridan’s period drama revolves about Christy Brown, the cerebral palsy-stricken painter who struggles to engage with the family around him until he discovers the one vocation he can control with his foot. However, that summary barely gets to the essence of the movie’s emotional core. It’s a naturally engaging story about perseverance against daunting physical challenges, made all the more heartbreaking by the intolerant times in which it takes place — but it would be nothing without the young Day-Lewis in the lead role, one that few actors could tackle without risking accusations of parody. Instead, he turns Brown into a vibrating, energetic creative figure battling to express his emotions and overcome the pity that surrounds him at every turn. It’s at once heartbreaking and hopeful, a testament to perseverance in which the performance embodies the themes to its core. Day-Lewis won his first Oscar for the role, and even as he continued to tackle new challenges, he already confirmed his mastery at this early stage. —Eric Kohn

My Beautiful Laundrette

From the start of his career Day-Lewis showed a penchant for muscular, angry and violent roles, starting with Stephen Frears’s searing 16 mm portrait of Margaret Thatcher’s London, “My Beautiful Laundrette,” which jumped from TV movie to arthouse phenomenon at the Edinburgh Film Festival. “I spent most of my time on the front line of London street life,” Day-Lewis said at the 2013 Santa Barbara Film Festival, “playing soccer, fighting on the school playground, and rebelling against authority and the British class system.” A controversial early exploration of sex, race and class, “My Beautiful Launderette” broke out Lewis, director Frears, rookie screenwriter Hanif Kureishi (who earned an Oscar nomination) and Working Title Films. With swaggering, sexy humor, Day-Lewis played Johnny, the street-tough ex-National Front boyfriend of Omar (Gordon Warnecke), the son of a Pakistani immigrant, who helps his childhood friend to renovate his uncle’s Battersea laundrette. Fears cast Day-Lewis after meeting him and asking him about his South London accent. Frears said: “‘You’re the son of a poet laureate, why are you speaking like that?’ He said he’d been to a comprehensive and had adopted it as a defence. Then he wrote me a letter saying he’d kill me if he wasn’t cast.” No one knew “My Beautiful Laundrette” would become an iconic film about the 1980s. —Anne Thompson

The Unbearable Lightness of Being” Day-Lewis was a perfect if unexpected choice to play Tomas, the detached lover at the center of this erotically charged adaptation of Czech novelist Milan Kundera’s most famous work. Disciplined in his practice surrounding sex and romantic attachments, Tomas bounces between Sabina (Lena Olin) and Tereza (Juliette Binoche) as both ravenous lover and aloof philosopher. Day-Lewis brings a perfect blend of lithe sexuality and mystery to Tomas, light on his feet and heavy in the head. He famously learned Czech for the part (a notoriously difficult language), and as a result his accent is spot on. What else would you expect from the man who made “method acting” a household term? —Jude Dry “There Will Be Blood

His voice lowered to a rumbling baritone beneath a scruffy mustache, Daniel Plainview becomes an extraordinary figure of capitalist intensity within a matter of minutes. Paul Thomas-Anderson’s most audacious filmmaking feat was matched by Day-Lewis’ remarkable transformation into the scheming, relentless oil miner and the empire he cobbles together in the heat. From the virtuosic intensity of his early management of a drilling company to the psychotic extremes of his final stage, Plainview is emblematic of the darkness lurking at the center of the American dream — which is why it’s all the more extraordinary that he’s played by an Englishman.

But of course, he’s not just an Englishman, he’s Daniel Day-Lewis, an actor so capable of transforming himself that in “There Will Be Blood” he seems to be reborn before our very eyes. Hovering on the edge of camp, he manages to take a line that on paper sounds patently ridiculous — you know, something about drinking someone else’s milkshake — and turn it into an iconic moment in film history, one loaded with the rage of boundless American greed. He was a lock for Best Actor the moment the cameras stopped rolling.

Related storiesDaniel Day-Lewis Announces He Is Retiring From ActingIsabelle Huppert, Mariachi and a History Lesson: Cannes Celebrates Its 70th Year With a Lively NightMark Boal and Annapurna Pictures Are Getting Into the Documentary Business
See full article at Indiewire »

Daniel Day-Lewis Retires From Acting

Daniel Day-Lewis Retires From Acting
Daniel Day-Lewis, the Oscar- and BAFTA-winning actor, has announced his retirement. The upcoming Phantom Thread, a drama that Variety reports will focus on the high-fashion industry, will be his last; the Paul Thomas Anderson–directed film will hit theaters on Christmas Day. The actor has not yet disclosed why he is quitting.

"Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor," his spokeswoman told Variety. "He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Poll: What’s Daniel Day-Lewis’ Best Film?

Poll: What’s Daniel Day-Lewis’ Best Film?
Daniel Day-Lewis is leaving behind an impressive filmography in the wake of the news that he’s retiring from acting.

The actor earned three best actor Oscars through his career — for “Lincoln,” “There Will Be Blood,” and “My Left Foot” — and earned nominations for two others — “Gangs of New York” and “In the Name of the Father.” Other major films include the adventure epic “The Last of the Mohicans,” musical “Nine,” and period drama “The Age of Innocence.”

The 60-year-old star is known throughout the industry as being a master of method acting. He famously confined himself to a wheelchair for his portrayal of Christy Brown in “My Left Foot.” He also committed to learning Czech for his role in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being.”

Related

Daniel Day-Lewis’ Film Career in Photos

Day-Lewis has played everything from artists and warriors, to presidents and gang leaders in his illustrious — albeit selective — career,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Shocker! Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting (Exclusive)

Shocker! Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting (Exclusive)
Three-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis, widely considered one of the preeminent actors of his generation, is retiring from acting, Variety has learned.

The 60-year-old star, who has played presidents, writers, and gang leaders in a career that has spanned four decades, has one final film awaiting release, an untitled drama set in the world of high fashion. It is scheduled to hit theaters on December 25, 2017 and reunites him with Paul Thomas Anderson, who directed Day-Lewis to a best actor Oscar in 2007’s “There Will Be Blood.” Day-Lewis intends to help promote the movie, according to a person familiar with his plans.

He did not give a reason for his retirement. In a statement, Day-Lewis’ spokeswoman, Leslee Dart, confirmed the news: “Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor. He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject. ”

Related

Daniel Day-Lewis: His 12 Best Films

Day-Lewis is the only performer to ever win three best actor Oscars. He was honored for the title role in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln,” for his turn as a rapacious oil man in “There Will Be Blood,” and for his performance as writer and artist Christy Brown in “My Left Foot.” He earned two other Academy Award nominations for “Gangs of New York” and “In the Name of the Father.”

Day-Lewis has been praised for his shape-shifting acting and versatility. He is known for going to extreme lengths for his performances, frequently remaining in character off-screen. He has also starred in musicals (“Nine”), adventure epics (“The Last of the Mohicans“), and period dramas (“The Age of Innocence”).

The method master once learned Czech to play a philandering doctor in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” listened to Eminem records to channel rage in “Gangs of New York,” and confined himself to a wheelchair for “My Left Foot” to play Brown, who had cerebral palsy.

Day-Lewis, who is the son of poet Cecil Day-Lewis and English actress Jill Balcon, made his screen debut at the age of 14 in a bit part in 1971’s “Sunday, Bloody Sunday.” He first gained attention on the stage and on television before dazzling critics in 1985 with the one-two punch of “My Beautiful Laundrette” and “A Room With a View,” convincingly playing a street tough and an upper class Edwardian.

Although he has remained in high demand, Day-Lewis is also known as being extremely selective, often waiting years between projects. In the late ’90s and early aughts he appeared to give up acting for a while, reportedly working as a cobbler before Martin Scorsese convinced him to return to the screen for “Gangs of New York.”

Day-Lewis has three children and is married to writer and director Rebecca Miller.

Related storiesPoll: What's Daniel Day-Lewis' Best Film?Haim Debut New Song 'Right Now,' Paul Thomas Anderson-Directed Video -- Not a Moment Too SoonTalent Agent Gene Parseghian Dies at 72
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance Selects Nabs ‘Let the Sunshine In’ With Juliette Binoche (Exclusive)

Sundance Selects Nabs ‘Let the Sunshine In’ With Juliette Binoche (Exclusive)
Sundance Selects has picked up all North American rights to “Let the Sunshine In” following its debut at the Cannes Film Festival this week.

The dramedy stars Juliette Binoche as a middle-aged artist and divorced mother, following her attempts to find romantic fulfillment. It earned strong reviews at the festival. Variety’s Guy Lodge called the picture an “exquisitely judged romantic comedy” and hailed it for documenting “the transient pleasures, pitfalls and emotional culs-de-sac of midlife dating.”

Xavier Beauvois, Philippe Katerine, Josiane Balasko, and Nicolas Duvauchelle co-star in the film, which has a script from Denis and Christine Angot. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Sundance Selects is an offshoot of IFC.

“We absolutely loved Claire’s touching and funny take on finding love and are thrilled to be back in business with her, Juliette Binoche and our friends at Film Distribution,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Newness’ Review: Nicholas Hoult And Laia Costa Can’t Save Drake Doremus’ Dating App Drama — Sundance 2017

‘Newness’ Review: Nicholas Hoult And Laia Costa Can’t Save Drake Doremus’ Dating App Drama — Sundance 2017
Have you guys heard about millennials? Well, Drake Doremus has — he’s one of them! — and he’s got some thoughts about all that random sex they’re having. Doremus, who won Sundance with 2011’s sensitively simple “Like Crazy,” has never met a flimsy romantic premise he couldn’t populate with beautiful people and banal observations. It was only a matter of time before this prolific indie auteur turned his eye toward the hedonistic thunderdome of dating apps.

Set in contemporary Los Angeles, “Newness” tells the story of two horny (but also sad) twentysomethings who mysteriously regain their feelings and fall in love, causing tensions between themselves and their society. This is not to be confused with Doremus’ last film, the sci-fi slog “Equals,” which was set in an emotionless utopia where two horny (but also sad) twentysomethings mysteriously regain their feelings and fall in love, causing tensions between them and their society.
See full article at Indiewire »

’20th Century Women’: How Mike Mills Empowered Annette Bening and Greta Gerwig

’20th Century Women’: How Mike Mills Empowered Annette Bening and Greta Gerwig
It all started with writer-director Mike Mills paying heed to his mother, his sisters, his female friends, and his wife. “He’s a genuine feminist,” said Greta Gerwig in our video interview. “I don’t think many men deserve that title. He’s a listener.”

“20th Century Women,” inspired by his mother and sister and their love of “underdog, misbegotten, impossible houses” when he grew up in Santa Barbara, is set in 1979 and tells the story of Jamie, a teenage boy (Chicago discovery Lucas Jade Zumann) being raised by his single, strong-minded, Depression-era older mom (Annette Bening) who has never been psychoanalyzed and doesn’t care to share what insights she may have about herself.

Mills honed the script for nearly three years before he found his actresses. After having dinner with Bening he decided that she had some of his late mother’s contrary spirit, he told me. “She has strength,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

’20th Century Women’: How Mike Mills Empowered Annette Bening and Greta Gerwig

  • Indiewire
’20th Century Women’: How Mike Mills Empowered Annette Bening and Greta Gerwig
It all started with writer-director Mike Mills paying heed to his mother, his sisters, his female friends, and his wife. “He’s a genuine feminist,” said Greta Gerwig in our video interview. “I don’t think many men deserve that title. He’s a listener.”

“20th Century Women,” inspired by his mother and sister and their love of “underdog, misbegotten, impossible houses” when he grew up in Santa Barbara, is set in 1979 and tells the story of Jamie, a teenage boy (Chicago discovery Lucas Jade Zumann) being raised by his single, strong-minded, Depression-era older mom (Annette Bening) who has never been psychoanalyzed and doesn’t care to share what insights she may have about herself.

Mills honed the script for nearly three years before he found his actresses. After having dinner with Bening he decided that she had some of his late mother’s contrary spirit, he told me. “She has strength,
See full article at Indiewire »

Turner’s FilmStruck Movie-Subscription Service Now on Apple TV; Roku, Chromecast Promised in 2017

Turner’s FilmStruck Movie-Subscription Service Now on Apple TV; Roku, Chromecast Promised in 2017
FilmStruck, Turner’s subscription movie service for film fans, is now available on fourth-generation Apple TV set-tops.

FilmStruck, which launched Nov. 1 after a two-week delay, offers hundreds of current and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films and is the exclusive streaming home to the Criterion Collection. Apple TV joins the service’s lineup of other devices, including Amazon Fire TV and iOS and Android devices, and it’s also available on the web.

Turner says it plans to add FilmStruck access for Roku devices and Google Chromecast in early 2017, followed by Sony’s PlayStation 4 and Microsoft Xbox One later in the year.

Related

After Delay, Turner Launches Netflix-Style FilmStruck Service With Classic, Indie and Foreign Movies

The service, managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM), is available only in the U.S. initially. Pricing starts at $6.99 per month without the Criterion Channel, and $10.99 monthly with the Criterion Channel. Turner also
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Franco Directing Josh Boone-Scripted ‘The Pretenders’

James Franco Directing Josh Boone-Scripted ‘The Pretenders’
Before Josh Boone‘s The Fault in Our Stars conquered the box office, one of the projects the busy writer-director wanted to make to was The Pretenders. Boone once described his script as “Carnal Knowledge meets Unbearable Lightness of Being or The Dreamers,” which doesn’t sound emotionally draining at all. In 2013, the director put together an impressive cast for […]

The post James Franco Directing Josh Boone-Scripted ‘The Pretenders’ appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Turner Delays Launch of FilmStruck Movie-Subscription Service

Turner has pushed back the launch of FilmStruck — its subscription VOD service with hundreds of indie, foreign, classic and cult films — to November, citing the need to iron out kinks on the registration process.

Originally, the service, developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, was slated to debut on Wednesday, Oct. 19.

Just like the final stages of completing a film, this additional time will allow us to put the finishing touches on FilmStruck in order to bring you a premium service with beautifully curated content and the largest streaming library of world-renowned arthouse, indie, cult and foreign films,” TCM said in an email to users who had registered with the service. “Rest assured, we’re working hard to bring you the high-quality streaming movie service you’ve been waiting for.”

Turner did not provide a specific date in November when FilmStruck will be available.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

FilmStruck and The Criterion Channel Reveal Subscription Pricing Plans

It’s been about half-a-year since we learned The Criterion Collection would be departing Hulu soon and bringing its entire streaming library to the new service FilmStruck, alongside films from Turner Classic Movies, Janus Films, Flicker Alley, Icarus, Kino, Milestone, Zeitgeist, Warners Bros. and more. Basically, it’s cinephile heaven, but on everyone’s mind is how much would this service-of-our-dreams cost?

Ahead of a launch on October 19, Turner has now revealed the subscription pricing plans, and thankfully it’s quite reasonable. The subscriptions are broken down into three options. First, for $6.99 a month, you get “a constantly refreshed library of hard to find & critically acclaimed films,” which we imagine will be the Mubi-style of a curated, more limited line-up featuring hand-picked selections from their entire library.

Then, for $10.99 a month, you get access to the entire The Criterion Channel, as well as exclusive bonus content, and “exclusive contemporary and previously unavailable films.
See full article at The Film Stage »
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