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Martin Landau movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Ed Wood,’ ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors,’ ‘North by Northwest’

  • Gold Derby
Martin Landau movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Ed Wood,’ ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors,’ ‘North by Northwest’
Martin Landau would’ve celebrated his 91st birthday on June 20, 2019. The Oscar-winning thespian enjoyed one of the greatest late career renaissances in cinema history, hitting his stride in his 60’s and remaining active until his death in 2017. But how many of his title remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1928 in Brooklyn, New York, Landau first came to the attention of movie audiences with a villainous role in Alfred Hitchcock‘s “North by Northwest” (1959). He became a television star playing Rollin Hand on “Mission: Impossible,” for which he received three consecutive Emmy nominations as Best Drama Actor (1967-1968) and a Golden Globe victory in 1968.

SEEAlfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

After decades of bit roles in B-movies and guest spots on TV (including playing a bad guy on “Columbo
See full article at Gold Derby »

Martin Landau movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Martin Landau movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Martin Landau would’ve celebrated his 91st birthday on June 20, 2019. The Oscar-winning thespian enjoyed one of the greatest late career renaissances in cinema history, hitting his stride in his 60’s and remaining active until his death in 2017. But how many of his title remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1928 in Brooklyn, New York, Landau first came to the attention of movie audiences with a villainous role in Alfred Hitchcock‘s “North by Northwest” (1959). He became a television star playing Rollin Hand on “Mission: Impossible,” for which he received three consecutive Emmy nominations as Best Drama Actor (1967-1968) and a Golden Globe victory in 1968.

After decades of bit roles in B-movies and guest spots on TV (including playing a bad guy on “Columbo”), Landau enjoyed a major career comeback thanks to Francis Ford Coppola
See full article at Gold Derby »

Golden Globes Honoree Jeff Bridges Reflects on ‘Great Life’ in Showbiz

  • Variety
Golden Globes Honoree Jeff Bridges Reflects on ‘Great Life’ in Showbiz
Jeff Bridges grew up with show business in his veins. His father, the late Lloyd Bridges, was a gregarious sort who not only loved the making of movies, but the selling of them as well. He would encourage his children to give it a go. “This is a great life,” he would tell them.

Still, like any rebellious kid, the younger Bridges — who will receive the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.’s Cecil B. DeMille Award for career achievement at the 76th annual Golden Globe Awards on Jan. 6 — was resistant to chasing his father’s chosen trade. He wanted to be a musician instead, or an artist. “I had maybe 10 movies under my belt before I thought I could do this for the rest of my life,” he said in 2009.

Eventually the passion kicked in. Six decades into a movie career that technically began when he was a 6-month-old infant on
See full article at Variety »

Peter Donat Dies: Veteran Actor Of Stage, TV, Films Was 90

  • Deadline
Peter Donat Dies: Veteran Actor Of Stage, TV, Films Was 90
Peter Donat, whose long career spanned roles on Broadway, television and in films, has died. He passed on Monday at home in Point Reyes Station, Calif. from complications of diabetes, according to his wife.

The Canadian-born character actor was best known for his role in six episodes of TV’s The X Files, where he recurred as Agent Fox Mulder’s father.

While that role was memorable, it was just a piece of the actor’s broad creative career. He performed frequently with respected companies like the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco and the Stratford Festival in Canada, playing Cyrano de Bergerac, Prospero, Shylock, King Lear and Hadrian VII.

In between the stage roles, Donat was a frequent presence as a guest-starr on such shows as The F.B.I., Hawaii Five-o, Mannix, McMillan & Wife, Hill Street Blues and Murder, She Wrote.

One well-received television role came on the original Dallas as the doctor treating J.
See full article at Deadline »

Peter Donat, ‘The X-Files’ Actor, Dies at 90

  • Variety
Peter Donat, ‘The X-Files’ Actor, Dies at 90
Peter Donat, who played Agent Fox Mulder’s father on “The X-Files” and acted in two Francis Ford Coppola films, died Monday at his home in Point Reyes, Calif. He was 90.

His wife, Maria, told the New York Times the cause was complications of diabetes.

Donat, perhaps most recognizable for his recurring “X-Files” role, was also a frequent stage actor, playing Cyrano de Bergerac, Prospero, Shylock, King Lear and Hadrian VII over the years.

He also guest starred on TV series like “The F.B.I.,” “Hawaii Five-o,” “Mannix,” McMillan & Wife,” “Hill Street Blues” and “Murder, She Wrote.”

Francis Ford Coppola cast Donat as a lawyer in “The Godfather Part II” after he was considered for the role of Tom Hagen in “The Godather,” a part that eventually went to Robert Duvall. Donat also played Otto Kerner in Coppola’s “Tucker: The Man and His Dream” in 1980.

The Canadian-born actor originated from Kentville,
See full article at Variety »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the 1990s went to many long overdue veterans of the industry. Actors like James Coburn, Jack Palance and Martin Landau finally earned Oscars in this decade, alongside then-newer stars like Cuba Gooding Jr and Kevin Spacey. What is your favorite Best Supporting Actor performance of the 1990s?

Read through a recap of their performances and vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actor.)

Joe Pesci, “Goodfellas” (1990) — Joe Pesci won his Oscar with the most iconic role of his career. In “Goodfellas” Pesci plays Tommy DeVito, a blustering gangster who provides some of the funniest lines in the film. Pesci was previously nominated in Best Supporting Actor for “Raging Bull” (1980).

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1990s: Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Jonathan Demme … ? [Poll]

Jack Palance, “City Slickers” (1991) — Jack Palance finally won his Oscar thanks to “City Slickers,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Movie News: Martin Landau Passes Away at 89; Watch Natalie Portman in New 'Planetarium' Trailer

Martin Landau: Winner of an Academy Award for his supporting performance in Tim Burton's Ed Wood, Martin Landau appeared in more than 175 movies and television shows over a rich and varied career that began in 1953. He passed away yesterday at the age of 89. He gave a notable performance in North by Northwest, starred on TV's Mission: Impossible and later earned Academy Award nominations for Tucker: The Man and His Dream and Crime and Misdemeanors. [THR]   Killers of the Flower Moon: We heard back in April that director Martin Scorsese might be teaming with Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert De Niro to make a big-screen version of Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI, based on a true story about murder and mayhem in Oklahoma in the...

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2017 celebrity deaths: Remembering Martin Landau, Mary Tyler Moore, Bill Paxton and more

2017 celebrity deaths: Remembering Martin Landau, Mary Tyler Moore, Bill Paxton and more
Oscar winner Martin Landau died on July 15 at the age of 89. The veteran actor won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in the film “Ed Wood” (1994) and received two other Oscar nominations for “Tucker: The Man and His Dream” (1988) and “Crimes and Misdemeanors” (1989). One of his first notable film […]
See full article at Gold Derby »

Martin Landau, Oscar-Winning 'Ed Wood' Actor, Dead at 89

Martin Landau, Oscar-Winning 'Ed Wood' Actor, Dead at 89
Martin Landau, the Oscar-winning Ed Wood actor who appeared in Crimes & Misdemeanors, North by Northwest and the Mission: Impossible TV series over a career that spanned over 50 years, died Saturday at the age of 89.

Landau died following "unexpected complications during a short hospitalization" at the UCLA Medical Center, his representative told The Hollywood Reporter.

The actor spent five years as a newspaper cartoonist in his native New York before deciding to focus on acting; As Landau often stated, he and Steve McQueen were notably the only two applicants accepted into
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Film News: Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89

Los Angeles – His acting career spanned from working with Alfred Hitchcock to Tim Burton. Along the way, he had significant TV and film roles including a Best Supporting Oscar win for portraying Bela Lugosi in Burton’s “Ed Wood”. Martin Landau died in Los Angeles on July 15, 2017. He was 89.

He was one of the rare actors known both for distinctive parts in both television and film, and had a revival in his career towards the end of his life. Besides working for directors Hitchcock and Burton, he also has roles in films by Woody Allen, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Francis Ford Coppola and Frank Darabont. On television, he had an early role on “Mission: Impossible in the 1960s, and another on the cult series “Space :1999”

Martin Landau in a 2013 Appearance in Chicago

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Martin Landau was born in Brooklyn, New York,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

R.I.P. Martin Landau and George A. Romero

Yesterday, the film world lost a pair of legends as reports came in that both Martin Landau and George A. Romero had passed away over the weekend. These two titans of the industry impacted Hollywood in very different ways, but both left an indelible mark on cinema, that’s for sure. One was an actor whose career spanned decades, including recent awards worthy work. The other was an independent filmmaker who revolutionized a whole genre, one he would tinker with for decades, creating a franchise that spanned his entire career. Both will be greatly missed. The film world is a lesser place for having lost them. Let us now celebrate Landau and Romero a bit with a small tribute to the two departed talents. Landau (1928-2017) was a giant of acting. An Oscar winner for his supporting turn in Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, he also had nominations to his
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

R.I.P. Martin Landau (1928 – 2017)

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau has passed away aged 89 after suffering “unexpected complications” following a hospital visit in Los Angeles.

Landau began his career as a cartoonist for the New York Daily News before moving into acting, with early roles in the likes of North by Northwest, Cleopatra and The Greatest Story Ever Told.

Between 1966 and 1969, he starred as Rollin Hand in the TV series Mission: Impossible, a role which saw him receiving the Golden Globe Award, as well as three Emmy nominations. He would later star in Space: 1999, and earned further Emmy nominations for guest roles in Without a Trace and Entourage.

On the big screen, Landau would be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for 1988’s Tucker: The Man and His Dream (winning a Golden Globe) and 1989’s Crimes and Misdemeanors, and would win the Oscar at the third time of asking for his role
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

R.I.P. Actor Martin Landau: 1928 – 2017

Screen actor Martin Landau has died at the age of 89. Landau passed away after “unexpected complications” after a brief stay at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles on Sunday.

Landau’s career started in the 1950s after landing a high-profile role in Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest in 1959. Subsequent parts included a run in television series Mission: Impossible and Space: 1999. He received a Golden Globe award and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his work in Tucker: The Man and His Dream in 1988, and then a second Oscar nomination for his appearance in Crimes and Misdemeanors the following year. His performance in the supporting role of Bela Lugosi in Ed Wood (1994) finally earned him the Academy Award, a Screen Actors Guild Award and a Golden Globe Award.

He also appeared in such titles as Cleopatra, They Call Me Mister Tibbs!, Decision at Midnight, The Greatest Story Ever Told,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Martin Landau’s 9 Most Memorable Performances, From ‘North by Northwest’ to ‘Ed Wood’ (Photos)

Martin Landau’s 9 Most Memorable Performances, From ‘North by Northwest’ to ‘Ed Wood’ (Photos)
North by Northwest” (1959) Landau had his breakout role as the righthand man of James Mason’s villainous spy in the classic Alfred Hitchcock thriller. “Cleopatra” (1963) He has a sizable role as Rufio, the last Roman still loyal to Richard Burton’s Antony in this bloated swords-and-sandals epic. “Mission: Impossible” (1966-69) He played the master of disguise Rollin Hand for all three seasons of the hit TV series that later spawned Tom Cruise’s movie franchise. “Tucker: The Man and His Dream” (1988) He earned his first Oscar nomination playing the New York fiancier who backs Jeff Bridges’ on his quixotic quest
See full article at The Wrap »

Martin Landau Has Passed Away

July 16th will be remembered as a day when we lost two cinematic legends. Following the heartbreaking news of George A. Romero's passing, it's now been reported that actor Martin Landau has passed away at the age of 89.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Landau passed away at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center from "unexpected complications."

Nominated several times for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar (including for his work in Francis Ford Coppola's Tucker: The Man and His Dream and Woody Allen's Crimes and Misdemeanors), Landau played horror icon Bela Lugosi opposite Johnny Depp in Tim Burton's Ed Wood, a superb supporting performance that earned him the Oscar win.

In addition to Coppola, Allen, and Burton, Landau worked with the great Alfred Hitchcock in North by Northwest. He would go on to appear in The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, one of many guest-starring roles on genre television series,
See full article at DailyDead »

Martin Landau, Mission: Impossible and Ed Wood Star, Dead at 89

Martin Landau, Mission: Impossible and Ed Wood Star, Dead at 89
Oscar winner Martin Landau died Saturday of “unexpected complications” following a brief stay at UCLA Medical Center, per The Hollywood Reporter. He was 89.

Landau got his big break when he was cast in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 film North by Northwest. In 1966, he began his star-making role as master of disguise Rollin Hand in the small screen Mission: Impossible, for which he earned the Golden Globe award as well as several Emmy nominations. In the series, Landau starred alongside then-wife Barbara Bain. It would mark the first of two small-screen collaborations for the couple, who later co-starred in the 1970s science-fiction program Space: 1999.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Martin Landau, Legendary ‘Ed Wood’ and ‘North by Northwest’ Actor, Dies at 89

Martin Landau, Legendary ‘Ed Wood’ and ‘North by Northwest’ Actor, Dies at 89
Martin Landau, a screen giant who brought his one-of-a-kind talents to Hollywood for more than 60 years, has died at 89. TMZ first reported the news, stating that the actor died yesterday of “unexpected complications” after briefly being hospitalized at UCLA Medical Center.

Read MoreGeorge Romero, Horror Icon and ‘Night of the Living Dead’ Director, Dies at 77

Landau won a richly deserved Academy Award for his role as Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s “Ed Wood,” having previously been nominated for both “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Tucker: The Man and His Dream”; he also had three Golden Globes, six Emmy nominations, a BAFTA nod and several lifetime achievement awards to his name. More than that, though, he had an inimitable screen presence that both delighted and, when called for, unsettled.

Landau first came to wide attention for his performance in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest,” going on to appear in “Cleopatra,
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Landau, star of TV's 'Mission: Impossible', dies at 89

  • ScreenDaily
Martin Landau, star of TV's 'Mission: Impossible', dies at 89
Oscar-winning star of Ed Wood turned down role of Spock in Star Trek.

Martin Landau, who won the Oscar for Ed Wood and made his name in the TV series Mission: Impossible, has died in Los Angeles following complications during a hospital visit. He was 89.

Landau was born June 28, 1928, in Brooklyn and worked as a newspaper cartoonist before the call of entertainment became too strong to resist.

He found fame in entertainment in the 1960s TV spy series Mission: Impossible, starring opposite his then wife Barbara Bain.

The couple also played alongside each other in the 1970s sci-fi episodic Space 1999. Landau appeared in many TV shows – earning an Emmys nod for Without a Trace in 2005 – and famously turned down the role of Spock in Star Trek, which eventually went to Leonard Nimoy.

In film he got his big break as the villainous James Woods’ lieutenant Leonard in Alfred Hitchcock’s North By Northwest. Roles included
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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