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Oliver & Company (1988) Poster

Trivia

When Oliver wakes up after sleeping on the truck tire, he sees people crossing past the alley where he's slept. One of those people is Roger from 101 Dalmatians (1961) (look for the guy with the brown hair, blue shirt, and blue pants).
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Animators shot photos of New York streets as reference, using cameras set eighteen inches off the ground to get a dog's point of view.
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Like many pre-1989 Disney Films, the video release of Oliver & Company (1988) was delayed for years. Despite this film being released in 1988 and being a commercial success, it was not released on video until 1996.
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The first Disney film to have its own department set up expressly for the purpose of generating computer animation.
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The last animated Disney Classic to use line overlay, also called cel overlay, a technique used to make the backgrounds match the lines of the xeroxed objects in the film.
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Patrick Stewart was considered to voice Francis, but he was busy acting as Captain Jean-Luc Picard on Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987). The role of Francis ultimately went to Roscoe Lee Browne. Stewart would eventually voice Mr. Woolenworth in Chicken Little (2005).
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HIDDEN MICKEY: Along with the other watches that Fagin has, he also wears a Mickey Mouse watch.
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Dom DeLuise had already had roles in several other animated films by this point, namely those by Don Bluth, but this was the only time he got the chance to voice a character in a Disney film. He loved the role so much, he kept ad-libbing lines that ended up being included in the film. He even chose to be in Oliver & Company (1988) over Bluth's The Land Before Time (1988) which released on the same day.
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The song "Why Should I Worry?" was later used as the theme song of a Disney TV series starring Joey Lawrence, who voiced Oliver in this film.
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Marlon Brando was offered the role of Sykes by the head of the Walt Disney Company Michael Eisner himself. Brando, however, turned it down, fearing the movie would bomb.
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Whitney Houston was considered for the role of Rita.
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The dogs' dances were based on the choreography of Bob Fosse.
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Features the first Disney song written by Howard Ashman ("Once Upon a Time in New York City").
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Early in the film's development it was decided that it would be a sequel to The Rescuers (1977). The producers then decided that the story wasn't convincing and started from scratch. The only things left are the New York setting and a few similarities between Jenny and Penny.
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Animator Mark Flood said that this film and The Lion King (1994) are his favorite Disney movies.
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Animator Peter Young, who also worked on the story, was slated to co-direct with George Scribner, but died at the young age of thirty-seven just before production began.
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One of few animated films to feature a front-and-center shot of New York City's Twin Towers. After the tragedy of 9/11, when shots of the iconic towers were being removed from many films to avoid upsetting people, Disney opted not to attempt to edit out the towers, mostly because it would ruin the film's original main title card and because it would be too time-consuming and costly to do. By 2001, Oliver & Company had already been widely distributed on VHS, so there was no point in editing it. Many New Yorkers later commended Disney not altering the film because they felt it was a good portrayal of the way New York used to be before 9/11, and they wanted it left as it was with the towers visible.
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The first full animated Disney "musical" (at least three songs in film, excluding main titles) since The Fox and the Hound (1981).
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Pongo from 101 Dalmatians (1961) and Jock, Trusty and Peg from Lady and the Tramp (1955) makes an appearance during "Why Should I Worry?".
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Steve Martin and Burt Reynolds were both considered for the role of Dodger.
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The man Fagin tries to pawn his Mickey Mouse watch to is a caricature of Peter Schneider, then vice-president of Disney animation.
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The first animated Disney film to be dubbed in Quebec.
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Dodger's appearance was inspired by Billy Joel's.
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Richard Rich worked on the film as co-director before being fired during production by Peter Schneider. Schneider claims Rich was belligerent towards him.
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Many of the inanimate objects in the film were created and animated on the computer: cars, cabs, buses, Sykes' limousine, Fagin's trike (part-scooter and part-shopping cart), a cement-mixer, a sewer pipe, a spiral staircase, a piano, subway tunnels and trains, cityscapes, and even the Brooklyn Bridge.
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Despite his name being in the title of the movie, Oliver has no name until about 33 minutes into the movie.
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The Dobermans Roscoe and Desoto were likely named after Roscoe Boulevard and Desoto Avenue, which are located in the San Fernando Valley, several miles from Walt Disney Studios.
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When Georgette is singing her song there's a picture of Professor Ratigan from The Great Mouse Detective (1986) among the framed pictures behind her.
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As of 2017, this is the only film in which Billy Joel has had an acting role (all other credited roles have been as himself or as the lead in his music videos).
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The license plate on Sykes' car says DOBRMAN.
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This film along with Aladdin (1992) are the only Disney animated feature films where Frank Welker doesn't just make animal noises. Welker in this film even voices Louie the Hotdog Vendor, and would later fill in for voicing Dodger in one of the House of Mouse (2001) episodes.
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Oliver & Company was the favorite film of Bailey Kane, a traumatized corporate lawyer in the book Bittersweet Symphony (ISBN 978-1975874513), which she mentions as being a film she went to see as a child when it hit theaters.
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The film is based around the book "Oliver Twist", only set in New York during the 1980s (the era of the film's release), centering around anthropomorphic domesticated pet animals (e.g. cats and dogs).
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One of Georgette's many framed pictures marks a striking resemblance to Scooby-Doo.
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His voice role as Dodger marks [name=nm0005055]'s only acting role of any consequence (not counting cameos as himself on several TV shows including [title=tt0103484] and [title=tt5462720].)
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His voice role as Dodger marks Billy Joel's only acting role of any consequence (not counting cameos as himself on several TV shows including [title=tt0103484] and [title=tt5462720].)
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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