7.8/10
87,169
211 user 68 critic

Mississippi Burning (1988)

Trailer
1:34 | Trailer
Two F.B.I. Agents with wildly different styles arrive in Mississippi to investigate the disappearance of some civil rights activists.

Director:

Alan Parker

Writer:

Chris Gerolmo
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Popularity
3,191 ( 78)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 16 wins & 24 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gene Hackman ... Anderson
Willem Dafoe ... Ward
Frances McDormand ... Mrs. Pell
Brad Dourif ... Deputy Pell
R. Lee Ermey ... Mayor Tilman
Gailard Sartain ... Sheriff Stuckey
Stephen Tobolowsky ... Townley
Michael Rooker ... Frank Bailey
Pruitt Taylor Vince ... Lester Cowens
Badja Djola ... Agent Monk
Kevin Dunn ... Agent Bird
Frankie Faison ... Eulogist
Thomas B. Mason Thomas B. Mason ... Judge (as Tom Mason)
Geoffrey Nauffts ... Goatee
Rick Zieff ... Passenger
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Storyline

Two FBI agents investigating the murder of civil rights workers during the 60s seek to breach the conspiracy of silence in a small Southern town where segregation divides black and white. The younger agent trained in FBI school runs up against the small town ways of his former Sheriff partner. Written by Keith Loh <loh@sfu.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

1964. When America was at war with itself.


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although a fictionalized account of the investigation of the murders of three civil rights workers in the 1960s, the film has been criticized by some for distorting history even as it has won widespread acclaim. However, regardless of whatever liberties the movie did, or didn't take with the facts of 1964 Mississippi, one scene has the absolute ring of truth: the radio roar of a distant crowd cheering a home run by a member of the 1964 St. Louis Cardinals. For all its apparent authenticity, however, including the actual voice of the longtime Cardinals announcer Jack Buck, the baseball broadcast is pure fiction. See more »

Goofs

The street signs are green with white writing. In the 60's they would have been white with black writing. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Driver: Uh, oh.
Passenger: What is it?
Passenger: [seeing the car behind them] What do they want?
Driver: I don't know... just pass me... pass me...
Driver: [trying to identify the following car] Is it a cop?
Passenger: I can't see.
[they are hit from behind]
Driver: What the fuck are these jokers playin' at?
Rear passenger: Oh, they ain't playin', you better believe it.
[...]
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Connections

Featured in The O'Reilly Factor: Episode dated 14 March 2008 (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

Walk on by Faith
Words and Music by James Cleveland
Performed by Lannie Spann McBride
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User Reviews

 
It broke my heart
31 December 2005 | by Smells_Like_CheeseSee all my reviews

Not saying this isn't an excellent film, it is just bluntly honest. I remember in English class in high school, we were learning about racism in the 60's, and how horrible it was. The worst part was that I am from a very racist town, unfortunately, and watching the beginning of the film terrified me because I felt like this world hadn't changed since I felt like I was living that film. Being one voice sometimes can either be helpful or get you into a lot of trouble.

I didn't want to see this film again because of the awful situations I saw or heard of. Now, I am out on my own, and I had the chance to see the movie once again, and felt that I could see it. It's a terrific and very powerful movie that can get anyone to cry unbearably. It's not just the actors, but Gene and William's characters, I wanted to be just like them, they were able to stand up even though the many times of being knocked down and caring so much just to try to in some way save that town.

I honestly feel that everyone should see this movie, it can change your life or make you look around and want to change things. I know this comment feels more like a lecture than a comment, but that's how much this movie got to me. I think we all can do something right in this world, it's just a matter or standing up. Even if this film isn't historically accurate, it's accurate enough to see how people treat other people. Hopefully, we will have a better future for generations to come.

9/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 January 1989 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Three Lives for Mississippi See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$15,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$225,034, 11 December 1988

Gross USA:

$34,603,943

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$34,603,943
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Orion Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby SR

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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