Dekalog (1989–1990)
8.0/10
2,598
11 user 22 critic

Dekalog, siedem 

"Thou shalt not steal" - but in this case the 'theft' is of a child by her real mother, who then finds herself emotionally unable to cope with the responsibility, while the stable and ... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Anna Polony ... Ewa
Maja Barelkowska ... Majka
Wladyslaw Kowalski ... Stefan
Boguslaw Linda ... Wojtek
Artur Barcis
Bozena Dykiel ... Ticket Woman
Katarzyna Piwowarczyk Katarzyna Piwowarczyk ... Ania
Stefania Blonska Stefania Blonska
Miroslawa Maludzinska Miroslawa Maludzinska
Dariusz Jablonski
Ewa Radzikowska Ewa Radzikowska
Jan Mayzel
Wanda Wróblewska Wanda Wróblewska
Edit

Storyline

"Thou shalt not steal" - but in this case the 'theft' is of a child by her real mother, who then finds herself emotionally unable to cope with the responsibility, while the stable and loving family that brought the child up are distraught. Written by Michael Brooke <michael@everyman.demon.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Poland | West Germany

Language:

Polish

Release Date:

15 June 1990 (Poland) See more »

Filming Locations:

Warsaw, Mazowieckie, Poland

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$100,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Referenced in The Simpsons: Lisa's First Word (1992) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Dekalog 7
12 March 2016 | by chaos-rampantSee all my reviews

The template for Dekalog is that we enter a life with its anxieties (a dying husband on a hospital bed, a husband who disappeared on Christmas Eve) and at some point the narrative surface gives way and reveals a more fluid, more interdepentent life of suffering beneath.

This is evident here in a child sister abducted (after a theatric performance no less, after the swirl of fiction) and by next morning she has become a daughter. We explore a bit more but it never amounts to more than drama about the choices we have to make.

The Kieslowski I like, as I am discovering with these Dekalog viewings, is that way he has of visually slipping ahead and back. This is on the more typical end of the spectrum, all about moral anxiety and doublebinds. The ending is both emotional and convenient, poured on as syrup instead of laid out as vision.


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 11 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed