Dekalog (1989–1990)
7.9/10
4,261
14 user 27 critic

Dekalog, dwa 

"Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain". An elderly doctor is approached by a woman with a complicated request. Her husband is gravely ill and may die, and she is ... See full summary »
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Krystyna Janda ... Dorota Geller
Aleksander Bardini ... Consultant
Olgierd Lukaszewicz ... Andrzej Geller
Artur Barcis ... Hospital Orderly
Stanislaw Gawlik ... Postman
Krzysztof Kumor ... Gynecologist
Maciej Szary Maciej Szary ... Apartment Caretaker
Krystyna Bigelmajer Krystyna Bigelmajer ... Nurse
Jerzy Fedorowicz ... Janek
Karol Dillenius Karol Dillenius ... Patient
Piotr Siejka ... Doctor
Ewa Ekwinska Ewa Ekwinska ... Barbara
Aleksander Trabczynski Aleksander Trabczynski ... Friend of Dorota's lover
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Storyline

"Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain". An elderly doctor is approached by a woman with a complicated request. Her husband is gravely ill and may die, and she is pregnant by someone else. If her husband dies, she wants to keep the child, but not otherwise, and she wants the doctor to give him an honest verdict on his chances. But the doctor is disturbed by her request, because his answer will directly affect the life or death of another human being. Is he entitled to play God? Written by Michael Brooke <michael@everyman.demon.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

Poland | West Germany

Language:

Polish

Release Date:

11 May 1990 (Poland) See more »

Filming Locations:

Warsaw, Mazowieckie, Poland

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Box Office

Budget:

$100,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Version of Dwando (2009) See more »

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User Reviews

 
'Dekalog': Part 2- the importance of one's word in human life and the sanctity of speech
11 February 2017 | by TheLittleSongbirdSee all my reviews

'Dekalog' is a towering achievement and a televisual masterpiece that puts many feature films to shame, also pulling off a concept of great ambition brilliantly. Although a big admirer of Krzysztof Kieślowski (a gifted director taken from us too early), and who has yet to be disappointed by him, to me 'Dekalog' and 'Three Colours: Red' sees him at his best.

After being blown away by Episode 1, which is some of the most thought-provoking and moving pieces of television ever produced, Episode 2 was a slight disappointment but still wonderful. It does drag a little in places, which may alienate some, something Episode 1 did not do, but that is all that is wrong. It is by all means not one of the best episodes of 'Dekalog' but also not one of the lesser ones, which still have many great merits which is testament to the overall high quality of 'Dekalog' and the supreme brilliance of the best stories.

As to be expected from Kieslowski, it is both beautiful and haunting to look at, with photography that's startling in its beauty and atmosphere. There are some very memorable images that add so much to the atmosphere and emotion of the story. The direction is quietly unobtrusive, intelligently paced and never too heavy, and the music is suitably intricate.

The themes and ideals are used to full potential, and the characters and their relationships and conflicts feel so real and emotionally resonant without being heavy-handed. Forgot to mention in Episode 1 the symbolism of the milk with it being used frequently in Episode 2 especially. Despite being based around one of the ten commandments, don't let that put you off, resemblance to religion is relatively scant. Despite some draggy pacing, the story is as thought-provoking, intelligent and poignant as Episode 1 with a powerfully dark feel too.

Acting is one of the episode's biggest strengths and is just too good to not be commented upon due to how complex and nuanced the performances are. Aleksander Bardini in particular does an absolutely wonderful job.

Overall, not as good as Episode 1 but still wonderful. 9/10 Bethany Cox


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