7.3/10
8,765
102 user 25 critic

The Beast of War (1988)

Trailer
2:54 | Trailer
A Soviet tank and its warring crew become separated from their patrol and lost in an Afghan valley with a group of vengeance-seeking rebels on their tracks.

Director:

Kevin Reynolds

Writers:

William Mastrosimone (screenplay), William Mastrosimone (play)
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1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
George Dzundza ... Daskal
Jason Patric ... Konstantin Koverchenko
Steven Bauer ... Khan Taj
Stephen Baldwin ... Anthony Golikov
Don Harvey ... Kaminski
Kabir Bedi ... Akbar
Erick Avari ... Samad
Chaim Jeraffi Chaim Jeraffi ... Moustafa (as Haim Gerafi)
Shoshi Marciano Shoshi Marciano ... Sherina (as Shosh Marciano)
Yitzhak Ne'eman Yitzhak Ne'eman ... Iskandar (as Itzhak Babi Ne'Eman)
David Sherrill ... Kovolov
Moshe Vapnik Moshe Vapnik ... Hasan
Claude Aviram Claude Aviram ... Sadioue
Victor Ken Victor Ken ... Ali
Avi Keedar Avi Keedar ... Noor
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Storyline

During the war in Afghanistan a Soviet tank crew commanded by a tyrannical officer find themselves lost and in a struggle against a band of Mujahadeen guerrillas in the mountains. A unique look at the Soviet 'Vietnam' experience sympathetically told for both sides. Written by Keith Loh <loh@sfu.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

There is no room in a tank for a conscience. See more »

Genres:

Adventure | Drama | War

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The mujahideens' motorcycles are single-cylinder 500cc M20s made by BSA. See more »

Goofs

When they are tying Constantine to the rock, the wrap around wire frame of his glasses has come off his right ear. A few moments later it is back in place around his ear (his hands are tied the whole time) See more »

Quotes

Samad: It is called "Pashtunwali". It's the code of honor.
Koverchenko: Pashtunwali?
Samad: Three obligations. First, "Melmastia", hospitality. Second, "Badal", revenge. Third, "Nanawateh", the obligation to give sanctuary to all those who ask.
Koverchenko: To all?
Samad: All.
Koverchenko: Even the enemy?
Samad: All.
Koverchenko: What if I kill your brother and you came for Badal, revenge? And I ask for Nanawateh?
Samad: Then I would be obligated to feed, clothe and protect you.
Koverchenko: That's incredibly civilized.
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Crazy Credits

At the start of the film, just after the Columbia Pictures logo the following quote is given: When you're wounded an' left on Afghanistan's plains. An' the women come out to cut up your remains, Just roll to your rifle an' blow out your brains, An' go to your Gawd like a soldier. - Rudyard Kipling See more »

Alternate Versions

There are two versions playing on American Premium (Subscription) Movie Channels. One has subtitles for the Mujahadeen and the other does not. Currently, on STARZ, the version with subtitles is playing. Last year, on A&E, was the version without subtitles. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Syphon Filter 3 (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

STREETCAR HEADED EAST
Written by VICTOR TSI
Performed by KINO
Produced by JOANNA STINGRAY
Courtesy of STINGRAY PRODUCTIONS
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User Reviews

 
As movie it was great and meaningful even going factually totally wrong
4 February 2008 | by gmalnieksSee all my reviews

Well, I think I got the point what was meant, but it shall be clear that it has nothing to do with portraying Afgan-Soviet conflict. This movie try to deal with a nature of war as it self and does it to my mind pretty good.

Well, these guys in a tank were not Russians in any manner. Maybe it is possible that some smarts is questioning his comrades towards enemies, but it's hard to consider it in USSR troops. Comradeship is a holy thing for them, holier then bible, so there is no way they could abandon one of them even when it would be an order (even if commander would gone insane to order such an action, crew would probably beat the sheet out of him rather then obey). My uncle served in action in Afganistan for soviets as commando. Although he isn't Russian and had little respect (as most Latvians) to soviets, he's never disrespected his army fellows or combating officers.

Starting action was pretty made up as well, as for village blowing purposes soviets would use choppers not tanks. Tanks was used in protecting roads and securing routes. Operatons was mainly carried out by solders and armored vehicles - BTR's. Tanks could be used as support, but there is no way massive tank attack would be enforced without commandos on foot or vehicles guarding them as it was shown (well, armament has always been a virtue for soviet commanders not soldiers).

But as I already said, in general this movie is totally worth to see.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Pushto

Release Date:

7 September 1988 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The Beast See more »

Filming Locations:

Israel

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Box Office

Budget:

$8,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$161,004

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$161,004
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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