7.1/10
66
1 user

Bal poussière (1989)

The chief of an African village, who is called 'Demi Dieu' because after God he is the owner of all the things, already has five wives. But as this is not enough he decides to find himself ... See full summary »

Director:

Henri Duparc

Writer:

Henri Duparc
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Bamba Bakari Bamba Bakari ... Demi Dieu
Tcheley Hanny Tcheley Hanny ... Binta
Naky Sy Savane Naky Sy Savane ... Nya
Thérèse Taba Thérèse Taba ... Fanta
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jeanne Banc Jeanne Banc
Victor Couzyn Victor Couzyn ... (as Victor Couzin)
Bertin Kouakou Bertin Kouakou
Ahmed Nassar Ahmed Nassar
Angèle Niangoran Angèle Niangoran
Mel Pacome Mel Pacome
Edit

Storyline

The chief of an African village, who is called 'Demi Dieu' because after God he is the owner of all the things, already has five wives. But as this is not enough he decides to find himself a sixth wife so that he has one for every day of the week except on Sunday when he uses to relax. Written by Volker Boehm

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

africa | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy

Edit

Details

Country:

Côte d'Ivoire

Language:

French

Release Date:

21 June 1989 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Dancing in the Dust See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Focale 13 See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
lightweight skirmish in the battle of the sexes
12 November 2010 | by Michael NeumannSee all my reviews

Early in the film one character (ironically, male) says, "all men are the same; only their money makes them different", and the maxim certainly applies to the leading citizen (in his own mind, at least) of a small African town where all men are lechers, fools or, in his instance, both. He's a rich, harmless buffoon who, with true middle class vanity, calls himself 'Demi-God', and has five wives to praise his name, until settling his amorous gaze on what he hopes will be number six: a sassy, independent city girl thought by the rest of the town (because of her education) to be wild. The lingering French influence on culture and comic impulse can be seen in the elements of bedroom farce and sexual exhibition (the English title - "Dancing in the Dust" - is Demi-God's euphemism for lovemaking). But with such lightweight commercial charm (including a novel method of preparing coq-au-vin, by taking a live chicken and pouring wine down its throat) the film certainly won't strike a blow for African women in the battle of gender aggression.


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed