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Ashik Kerib (1988)

Ashug-Karibi (original title)
A talented but poor minstrel is forced to wander throughout the world because of impossibility to be with his true love - a rich merchant's daughter.

Directors:

Sergei Parajanov, Dodo Abashidze (co-director) (as David Abashidze)

Writers:

Gia Badridze (as Georgy Badridze), Mikhail Lermontov (story "Ashik Kerib the Lovelorn Minstrel")
Reviews
6 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Yuri Mgoyan Yuri Mgoyan
Sofiko Chiaureli
Ramaz Chkhikvadze
Konstantin Stepankov
Baia Dvalishvili Baia Dvalishvili
Veronique Matonidze Veronique Matonidze ... (as Veronika Metonidze)
David Dovlatian David Dovlatian
Levan Natroshvili Levan Natroshvili
Slava Stepanian Slava Stepanian
Nodar Dugladze Nodar Dugladze
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Storyline

Wandering minstrel Ashik Kerib falls in love with a rich merchant's daughter, but is spurned by her father and forced to roam the world for a thousand and one nights - but not before he's got the daughter to promise not to marry till his return. It's told in typical Paradjanov style overlaid with Azerbaijani folk songs. Written by Michael Brooke <michael@everyman.demon.co.uk>

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Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sergei Parajanov's last completed film. See more »

Connections

Featured in Parajanov: The Last Spring (1992) See more »

User Reviews

 
fractured fairy tale from a remote culture
5 November 2010 | by mjneu59See all my reviews

Another odd, exotic fable from the Soviet Union's most enigmatic filmmaker, set this time in a storybook past where, to win the hand of his true love, a penniless minstrel is forced to wander for a thousand days in search of wisdom and enlightenment. Parajanov is one of the leading figures in his country's so-called 'poetic cinema movement', which means his films are crude, heavily stylized rites of passage, thick with symbols and anachronisms. The naive, almost primitive formality recalls both the ancient, ritual folklore of its Central Asian setting and the cheap conventions of early silent film melodrama, with the Georgian voice-over narration (added on top of Parajanov's post-dubbed Azerbaijani dialogue) giving the film an added level of weirdness. On his magical quest the lovelorn troubadour encounters a blind wedding party, a despotic sultan with a toy machine gun toting harem, a pantomime tiger, and survives various other trials and tribulations, all to a nerve-racking background of wailing Middle Eastern music.


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Details

Country:

Soviet Union

Language:

Azerbaijani | Georgian | Russian

Release Date:

23 November 1988 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The Hoary Legends of the Caucasus See more »

Filming Locations:

Baku, Azerbaijan

Company Credits

Production Co:

Georgian-Film See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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