7.8/10
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The New Statesman 

The ultra right-wing Alan B'Stard, the most selfish, greedy, dishonest, sadistic and sociopathic Conservative MP of them all, plots to achieve his meglomaniacal ambitions.
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Episodes

Seasons


Years



4   3   2   1   Unknown  
1994   1992   1991   1990   1989   1988   … See all »
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Rik Mayall ...  Alan B'Stard 29 episodes, 1987-1994
Michael Troughton ...  Piers Fletcher-Dervish 26 episodes, 1987-1992
Marsha Fitzalan ...  Sarah B'Stard 21 episodes, 1987-1992
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Storyline

Tells the adventures of Conservative MP Alan B'Stard, a man who doesn't have any morals at all. He stops at nothing to make himself richer and more powerful in the party and is involved in drugs, adult films, fraud (making up charities with the initials C.A.S.H when writing on cheques) and even murder but believes that he will never be caught as he is a Conservative MP and therefore all powerful. He has almost complete power over another MP - Piers Fletcher-Dervish who is nearly completely brainless. His wife Sarah B'Stard has very loose morals (both of them have affairs mostly every day) and has hated her husband from five minutes after they got married and tries to use Alan to get anything she wants. Each episode contains recent news items and Alan moves with the times with things like the end of the cold war, the Nazi hunt in the late 80's as well as the Animal Freedom Party. Keeping up with the huge amount of cash, Alan moves (in the 4th season) to the European Union to continue ... Written by Lee Horton <Leeh@tcp.co.uk>

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Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Rowena Cooper was credited as R. R. Cooper to keep her gender dubious for the forst 6 episodes of season 1 See more »

Quotes

Alan B'Stard: Bottom please, Piers!
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Connections

Referenced in Comedy Connections: The New Statesman (2007) See more »

User Reviews

Mmm, Corrupt!
6 March 2000 | by Chew-7See all my reviews

When I first sat down to view my first helping of "The new statesman" I was of course expecting a programme with a fantastic mix of Rik Mayall's wonderful wit and charm, his comic acting genius and the creative talent of Maurice Gran and Laurence Marks. I'll be honest... I was not disappointed! It had all of these along with bag fulls of beautiful political corruption thrown in at every opportunity. A treat from beginning to end, while Rik's character, (suitably named "Alan B'stard) managed week in week out to be the most cruel, obnoxious and all round disturbingly corrupt um, "B'stard" on TV, yet still came away with the audience loving him. The only warning that I will give is that if you're looking for another "Bottom" then this is not the place! In fact the ideal viewer for this show would be a half-crazed political mess who adores Rik Mayall's wiley wit and charm... Oh, and it would help if you're a bit left wing, and if you're right wing... Have a laugh at yourself!


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 September 1987 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Državnik novog kova See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(26 episodes) | (1 episode)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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