7.1/10
169,851
330 user 108 critic

Spaceballs (1987)

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2:31 | Trailer
A star pilot and his sidekick must come to the rescue of a Princess and save the galaxy from a ruthless race of beings known as Spaceballs.

Director:

Mel Brooks
Reviews
Popularity
329 ( 122)
1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mel Brooks ... President Skroob / Yogurt
John Candy ... Barf
Rick Moranis ... Dark Helmet
Bill Pullman ... Lone Starr
Daphne Zuniga ... Princess Vespa
Dick Van Patten ... King Roland
George Wyner ... Colonel Sandurz
Michael Winslow ... Radar Technician
Joan Rivers ... Dot Matrix (voice)
Lorene Yarnell Jansson Lorene Yarnell Jansson ... Dot Matrix (as Lorene Yarnell)
John Hurt ... John Hurt
Sal Viscuso ... Radio Operator
Ronny Graham ... Minister
Jim J. Bullock ... Prince Valium (as JM J. Bullock)
Leslie Bevis ... Commanderette Zircon
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Storyline

On the peaceful planet Druidia, King Roland attempts to marry his daughter Princess Vespa to Prince Valium, but Vespa and her loyal droid Dot Matrix escape during her wedding. After wasting the fresh air on the distant planet Spaceball, the good-for-nothing President Skroob orders the archvillain henchman Dark Helmet to kidnap Princess Vespa to force King Roland to provide them with the code to Druidia's atmosphere. Under those circumstances, the seasoned mercenary Lone Starr and his trusty half-human, half-canine sidekick Barf will attempt to save the Princess in distress, while at the same time, the ruthless loan-shark Pizza the Hutt is after them. But in the end, only he who can harness the mystical and mighty force known only as "The Schwartz" will be able to save the day. Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

May the Schwartz be with you! See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jim J. Bullock played the narcoleptic Prince Valium. Valium is a trademark of the drug diazepam. As Valium was prescribed as a sleep medication, the expression "I have a date with Prince Valium" was slang for a person taking the medication and going to bed, and the reference for the character constantly yawning and falling a sleep. See more »

Goofs

Although Dark Helmet throws Lone Starr's Schwartz ring down a grating, Lone Starr is wearing it in the Winnebago after Mega Maid explodes. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Radio Operator: Colonel Sandurz!
Colonel Sandurz: What is it, Sergeant Ricco?
Radio Operator: You told me to let you know the moment Planet Druidia was in sight, sir.
Colonel Sandurz: So?
Radio Operator: Planet Druidia's in sight, sir.
Colonel Sandurz: You're really a Spaceball. You know that, don't you?
Radio Operator: Thanks, sir.
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Crazy Credits

In the style of the "Star Wars" movies, there are no opening credits, only the title followed by a crawl. See more »

Alternate Versions

In a CBS airing (and likely all US airings), every instance of the word "asshole" in the famous "how many assholes have we got on this ship?" scene is replaced by "moron". See more »

Connections

Featured in Atop the Fourth Wall: Air Raiders #1 (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Wanna Be Loved by You
Performed by Ladyfire
Produced by Michael Lloyd
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User Reviews

 
Yuks in "Space"...
9 February 2000 | by Mister-6See all my reviews

Leave it to Mel Brooks; no one else could make a space movie with references to "The Wizard of Oz", "The Godfather", Mr. Coffee and flying Winnebagos.

"Spaceballs" is just about the best post-"History of the World Part I" film Mel has made and that's saying something, considering how many great jokes Mel and Company is able to pull off while within PG territory.

Easy enough to guess that this is Mel's take on "Star Wars", complete with his own versions of C-3P0 (Dot Matrix), Princess Leia (Princess Vespa), Chewbacca (Barf the Mawg) and a combination of Han Solo and Luke Skywalker (LoneStarr).

Oh, and let's not forget Dark Helmet! The very embodiment of evil (Mel Brooks-style) who not only wears a black cloak and headpiece but also a stylishly-wide black tie. And when he strikes...it's usually not above the belt.

The gags come fast and furious and, as is usually the case, all the regular faces show up (Graham, DeLuise, Van Patten) and Mel gives it all he's got. Lots of space sagas get equal ribbing (the "Star Wars" trilogy, "Alien", "Planet of the Apes") and there isn't a cliche that Mel fails to notice.

You can't blame Mel Brooks for thinking this genre needed a good skewering. He started it in "History of the World" with his "Jews in Space" coming attraction and continues it here. My only complaint: Mel, why did you have to wait so long??

Eight stars, plus a half star more for Pizza the Hutt; I loved it, especially when the pepperoni started running. Also for President Skroob's (Brooks') comment after being mis-transported ("Why didn't somebody tell me my a** was so big??").

Okay, nine stars. Mel Brooks strikes back!


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

24 June 1987 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Planet Moron See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$22,700,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,613,837, 28 June 1987

Gross USA:

$38,119,483

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$38,119,483
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby Stereo (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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