5.8/10
354
7 user 10 critic

Someone to Love (1987)

Trailer
2:51 | Trailer
A Hollywood film director assembles a group of friends and strangers for a social gathering on Valentines Day in a deserted movie theater where he interviews each one on their opinions on love and loneliness.

Director:

Henry Jaglom

Writer:

Henry Jaglom
Reviews

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Henry Jaglom ... Danny Sapir
Andrea Marcovicci ... Helen Eugene
Michael Emil Michael Emil ... Mickey Sapir
Sally Kellerman ... Edith Helm
Oja Kodar ... Yelena
Stephen Bishop Stephen Bishop ... Blue
David Frishberg David Frishberg ... Harry
Orson Welles ... Danny's Friend
Geraldine Baron Geraldine Baron ... Attendee
Ronee Blakley ... Attendee
Minda Burr Minda Burr ... Attendee
Jeff Dowd ... Attendee
Deborah Edwards Deborah Edwards ... Attendee
James Flaherty ... Attendee
Barbara Flood Barbara Flood ... Attendee / Carol
Edit

Storyline

Filmmaker Danny Sapir and actress Helen Eugene are several months into their relationship. Helen's want for neither to "sleep over" following their sexual encounters - Helen says because she still feels more comfortable sleeping by herself - Danny sees as a deeper indication of the truly casual state of their relationship. Danny decides to send a blanket invitation to many of his friends inviting anyone who will be alone on Valentine's Day to a gathering at a grand old theater he and his financial manager brother Mickey own in Santa Monica but which Mickey had prearranged without Danny's knowledge prior to the purchase to be demolished to make way for a shopping center. Most of those friends that end up attending are expecting the gathering to be a traditional party. But Danny, who does provide a day long social of sorts with food and drink, wants to ask these friends the broad question, "why are you alone?", the question stemming in part from his and Helen's own relationship. He also... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The last film appearance of Orson Welles. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Danny's Friend: We're not filmmakers, you know? We're just a ragtag bunch of people doing something that is technologically already almost passe. You know, that's a great problem with movies, is that they're always old-fashioned. It takes too long to make a movie. By the time your idea's on the screen, it's already dead.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Who Is Henry Jaglom? (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

Sure Thing
Written by Jerome Kern and Ira Gershwin
Performed by Dave Frishberg
See more »

User Reviews

 
Touching Last Moments with Orson Welles
1 June 2014 | by bbrebozoSee all my reviews

If you are an Orson Welles buff, you must see the first few minutes and last few minutes of this film, which are the only times that Welles appears. Welles is seated behind a wall of theater chairs, I'm guessing because the aging and arthritic Welles was becoming increasingly self conscious about his appearance and immobility. Only his head, shoulders and hands are visible. His legendary booming-from-the-heavens voice has become a little crackly, and yet he is energetic and intellectually alive. At the end of the film, Welles engages in an interesting and apparently ad-libbed conversation with Henry Jaglom, the lead actor/director of the movie, in which they ruminate about the end of the movie, and how it relates to the end of life itself. As the credits roll, Jaglom -- no doubt aware that this is the last film appearance of the ailing Welles -- is reluctant to say "cut," but an unusually jovial and even "sweet" Orson Welles booms the word out for him, as though he were eager to wrap things up. But Jaglom *still* can't bring himself to end the film, so an upbeat Welles laughingly shouts out "cut" for a second time. I'm probably not doing justice to this scene with my poor writing skills, but I've watched this ending several times and am haunted by it.

As for the rest of the movie: I suggest watching the first couple of minutes where Orson Wells speaks, then fast-forward through a long and somewhat tedious bedroom scene with Jaglom and Andrea Marcovicci, then watch the rest of the movie, which takes place in an old theater that is scheduled to be demolished. Much of the film is clumsily directed, in an apparent effort to impose Wellesian cutaways and cross-talk into the movie. But there are great moments in the some of the dialogue and interactions actions in that theater. And I was particularly glad to see Sally Kellerman and Andrea Marcovicci, two of the most beautiful, intriguing, and mysterious actresses to come out of the 1970's and 1980's. They are in top form here.

BOTTOM LINE: Come for a few last fascinating moments with Orson Welles, stay for the frequent nuggets of gold in this film that are worth mining for.


4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 7 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 April 1988 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Alguien a quien amar See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

We've Got Your Streaming Picks Covered

Looking for some great streaming picks? Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist.

Visit our What to Watch page



Recently Viewed