Nuts (1987) - News Poster

(1987)

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Meryl Streep in ‘Ironweed’: A look back at her seventh Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘Ironweed’: A look back at her seventh Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 7 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

On paper, “Heartburn” (1986) had the sound of a surefire smash. The picture reunited the talented trio from “Silkwood” (1983) – leading lady Meryl Streep, director Mike Nichols and screenwriter Nora Ephron. Production on the film hit a snag early on, as Nichols, seeing no magic between he and Streep, fired leading man Mandy Patinkin after mere days of shooting. Things would presumably still be A-ok, however, if not better, considering Patinkin’s replacement was none other than Jack Nicholson, hot as ever with his Academy Awards victory for “Terms of Endearment” (1983) and success the year prior with “Prizzi’s Honor” (1985).

That summer, “Heartburn” hit theaters to reviews
See full article at Gold Derby »

Eliza Hittman and Penny Lane Receive Grants from Rooftop Films

Hittman: Dp/30/: The Oral History of Hollywood/YouTube

“Beach Rats” writer-director Eliza Hittman and “Nuts!” helmer Penny Lane both have something to celebrate. They’ve scored grants from non-profit org Rooftop Films, Variety reports. The filmmakers received Garbó NYC Feature Film Grants, which include a $15,000 cash prize.

Rooftop helps support New York City filmmakers and musicians by providing grants, renting equipment at low costs, and organizing screenings. They’ve previously backed projects such as Gillian Robespierre’s “Obvious Child” and Kitty Green’s “Casting JonBenet.”

According to the source, “Hittman will use the money support her new film, ‘A,’ and Lane will use it on her next project, an untitled film about religious activism.”

Other grantees include Elizabeth Lo, who will be co-directing her debut feature, and Joanna Arnow (“Bad at Dancing”).

Both Hittman and Lane scored positive reviews for their latest features.

Hittman’s “Beach Rats” follows a
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Battleground

Battleground

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1949 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 118 min. / Street Date January 10, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Van Johnson, John Hodiak, Ricardo Montalban, George Murphy, Marshall Thompson, Don Taylor, James Whitmore, Douglas Fowley, Leon Ames, Guy Anderson, Denise Darcel, Richard Jaeckel, James Arness

Cinematography: Paul Vogel

Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Hans Peters

Film Editor: John D. Dunning

Original Music: Lennie Hayton

Written by: Robert Pirosh

Produced by: Dore Schary

Directed by William A. Wellman

“The Guts, Gags and Glory of a Lot of Wonderful Guys!”

— say, what kind of movie is this, anyway?

Action movies about combat are now mostly about soldiers that fight like killing machines, or stories of battle with a strong political axe to grind. WW2 changed perceptions completely, when a mostly civilian army did the fighting. With the cessation of hostilities combat pictures tapered off quickly, and Hollywood gave the subject a break for several years.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly' Star Eli Wallach Passes Away at Age 98

'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly' Star Eli Wallach Passes Away at Age 98
Legendary actor Eli Wallach, best known for his role as the villainous Tuco in The Good the Bad and the Ugly, passed away in New York City yesterday at the age of 98. The actor's passing was confirmed by his daughter, Katherine.

Born in 1915 in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn, Eli Wallach began studying acting after receiving a B.A. and M.S. in education from the University of Texas and City College of New York. His acting ambitions were cut short when he was drafted to serve in World War II, but he began acting in several plays upon his return to New York in 1945. In 1948, he was one of the 20 core actors who helped found The Actor's Studio, where he honed his method acting craft.

He won a Tony Award in 1951 for his performance in Tennessee Williams' The Rose Tattoo, which was directed by Elia Kazan. Tennessee Williams
See full article at MovieWeb »

Legendary 'The Good The Bad & The Ugly' star Eli Wallach passes away at 98

  • Hitfix
Legendary 'The Good The Bad & The Ugly' star Eli Wallach passes away at 98
98 years old. Remarkable. I can't imagine making it to 98. I can't imagine the breadth of life experience you could have in that amount of time. Eli Wallach leaves behind a truly great filmography and a family life that is enviable, having been married to the same woman, Anne Jackson, since 1948. She had a hell of a filmography herself, and they had three children together. I am in awe of anyone who can build a life that solid for that long, never mind someone who works in the film industry, where relationships are, at best, impermanent, and at worst, inconsequential. Wallach will leave an amazing legacy onscreen, but he was part of something larger, a total shift in the way acting was approached, and telling his story is telling the story of that paradigm change. He was part of that first wave of Method actors who made the jump from their
See full article at Hitfix »

Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98
Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98
Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘America’s Got Talent’ Recap: Innovative Force Steals The Show

Another week, another round of 12 talents battling it out for a place in the semi-finals on ‘America’s Got Talent.’ The stakes continue to get higher every week, and the competition was flying high (literally) on the July 30 episode.

America’s Got Talent is making itself quite at home at Radio City Music Hall. The July 30 live episode featured another set of 12 amazing talents trying to earn votes for a spot in the semi-finals. HollywoodLife.com picked our five favorites from the episode — and it’s a diverse group of talent, to say the least.

Top 5 Performances From July 30

5. Ciana Pelekai

This 12-year-old singer from Hawaii is just about the cutest thing we’ve ever seen. Ciana has big dreams of being like Beyonce and Christina Aguilera and she’s got the voice to prove it. She was understandably nervous in her first performance at Radio City Music Hall, but
See full article at HollywoodLife »

Les Miz *Winners*

It's Reader Appreciation Month so I'm playing Santa with gifts.

I'm so sorry I didn't announce this sooner! I do get backed up here. I know those of you who entered the Les Miz contest are dying to just buy the new blu-ray/dvd combo pack if you didn't win. This contest had a great response. I asked interested Red & Black revolutionaries to answer three questions:

• Which kind of bread would you bake Valjean so he doesn't steal another loaf?

• Which movie hooker other than Fantine should've had a death bed song?

• Bring Him Home: Jackman, Redmayne, Tveit or Crowe?

I had much fun reading the often creative answers. But the three winners, chosen randomly, are...

Rob S in Palm Springs who writes:

Bread: Pain de campagne, which I hope Hugh will stick around to enjoy as pain perdu. Hooker: Mildred, from Of Human Bondage....Bette Davis croaking it out as she croaks.
See full article at FilmExperience »

8 Kickass Courtroom Performances From Legendary Actresses, In Honor Of Doma's Day With Scotus

We've all got to do our part to help with the Scotus situation today, kids. I know I'm doing mine: Here are eight fabulous female performanes in courtroom movies to inspire you for the day ahead. Even if they drive younuts, you still qualify to look glamorously insane like Frances Farmer.

1. Meryl Streep in Kramer vs. Kramer

Joanna Kramer ditched her family not because she was bored of parenting (which I would've completely understood), but because her despair was so significant that she felt it best to remove herself from the home she shared with her obnoxious husband and tolerable son. Later, when she wanted custody of the scamp, she delivered a tearful monologue about painting clouds on bedroom walls and the misery of the Kramer household, concluding with the defiant line, "I am his mother." Meryl famously wrote most of this great soliloquy, and knowing Meryl's talents, she probably also sewed her own costume,
See full article at The Backlot »

70 Things We Love About Barbra Streisand, in Honor of Her 70th Birthday

Which is more shocking: the fact that Barbra Streisand turns 70 years old today, or the fact that she's been famous for more than 50 of them? Bottom line, everything about Barbara Joan Streisand is astounding, and we've compiled 70 accomplishments, songs, performances, and trivia items to celebrate about the most accomplished female vocalist of the past century. Don your naughtiest Owl and the Pussycat lingerie and jump along with us through a haphazard history of the woman who dazzled Broadway, dumbfounded Ryan O'Neal (I am obsessed with What's Up, Doc?), and has remained larger than life for longer than anyone else.

1. "People"

2. Geri Cusensa invented the crimping iron for and because of Barbra Streisand.

3. She played opposite Joan Rivers (in a pseudo-lesbian role) in an off-off-Broadway drama called Driftwood.

4. The cover of 1978's Superman album is flawless.

5. Her spitfire comic delivery and amazing tan in What's Up, Doc?

6. "Get Happy/Happy Days
See full article at The Backlot »

Barbra Streisand Movies: Grading The Star's Hollywood Career

One thing's for sure: The frosting on her birthday cake will be like buttah. As Barbra Streisand turns 70 on Tuesday, you'd think her reputation would be secure. She's conquered every medium, she's one of only a dozen or so members of the Egot club (people who've won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony), and she's one of the most popular and best-selling singers of all time. Still, despite her two Oscars, her Hollywood career has never gotten its due. In part, that's because, in 44 years of screen acting, she's made just 18 movies. Young audiences who know her only as Ben Stiller's exuberant mother from the "Fockers" movies can't be blamed for not knowing that she was once a groundbreaking dramatic and comic star, a reliably funny and sexy leading lady, a pioneering jill-of-all-trades filmmaker, or a celebrated (and reviled) movie diva. She's made just six movies in the last 30 years,
See full article at Moviefone »

Stage Tube: Barbra Streisand Talks Heart Health at TEDxWomen Conference

Barbra Streisand has appeared on Broadway in I Can Get It For You Wholesale and Funny Girl. She has also received a special Tony Award. Her film work includes Funny Girl, Funny Lady, Yentl, and Nuts. She has won numerous awards including the Oscar, Grammy, and Emmy awards. Today, in a simulcast event, the star talked about women's heart health at the TEDxWomen conference hear what she had to say on the issue by clicking below.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Actor Leslie Nielsen Dead At Age 84

  • CinemaRetro
 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Actor Leslie Nielsen, who improbably morphed from B-level dramatic leading man to a comedy acting legend, has died from complications with pneumonia at age 84. A native Canadian, Nielson was the nephew of silent screen star Jean Hersholt, for whom the honorary Oscar award was named. In an interview with the Boston Globe, Nielsen said, "I did learn very early that when I would mention my uncle, people would look at me as if I were the biggest liar in the world. Then I would take them home and show them 8-by-10 glossies, and things changed quite drastically. So I began to think that maybe this acting business was not a bad idea, much as I was very shy about it and certainly without courage regarding it. My uncle died not too long after I was in a position to know him. I regret that I had not
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Sargent Scripting Another Spidey

It's not entirely out with the old and in with the new when it comes to Columbia Pictures' controversial Spider-Man reboot.

The studio earlier this year made the decision to scrap plans for a fourth film in director Sam Raimi and star Tobey Maguire's web-slinger series, and brought in, ironically, Marc Webb ((500) Days of Summer) to helm a brand new series, and revisit Peter Parker's teenage 'growing pains'. While Jamie Vanderbilt (Zodiac) was also hired to write the script, Heat Vision says veteran Spider-Man scribe Alvin Sargent has rejoined the franchise to polish Vanderbilt's work.

Like Marvel's main man Stan Lee, who keeps popping up in cameos, Sargent will remain a constant in the theatrical Spider-Man universe, having done an uncredited re-write on the original in 2002, and co-writing both sequels in 2004 and 2007.

Sargent has been around the Hollywood scene since the early '50s when he had a
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Babs Posterized

"Hello Gorgeous!"

Barbra Streisand turned 68 yesterday. I thought we'd celebrate with posters for every movie she ever made. Because we're crazy like that. And it's fun to see someone's complete cinematic history all displayed like so.

Funny Girl (1968) | Hello Dolly (1969) | On a Clear Day You Can See Forever (1970)

The Owl and the Pussycat (1970) | What's Up Doc? (1972) | Up the Sandbox (1972)

The Way We Were (1973) | For Pete's Sake (1974) | Funny Lady (1975)

A Star is Born (1976) | The Main Event (1979) | All Night Long (1981)

Yentl (1983) | Nuts (1987) | The Prince of Tides (1991)

The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996) | Meet the Fockers (2004) | Fockers Sequel (2010)

Babs is still one of the most famous people on the planet but I'm guessing that younger generations have quite the incomplete picture of her career. I'm guessing that that picture hangs in an old fashioned frame and shows the diva in a turtleneck sweater. Somehow her expression conveys stifling self regard, political activism and mega-wealth all at once.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Streep Nom #7-8: The Abundant Riches of 1987-88

We've been looking at each Meryl Streep Oscar nod and its competitive field. Previously: 78, 79, 81, 82, 83 and 85

Meryl Streep's first act was the Liberated Lady. The second was The Chameleon in which Meryl was always the lead, always had new hair, voice and body language and basically controlled Oscar's Universe. It was as if there was only 4 spots for Best Actress, one reserved for her in perpetuity. This second act ended with her intense immersion into notorious dingo-hating Lindy Chamberlain in A Cry in the Dark. [Editor's Note: Yes, I'll do a top ten performance list when "Streep at 60" wraps in mid July. I've heard your requests and I've been rewatching all the movies.]

Starting in 1989 Act III of Streep's career began but we'll get to that shortly. First, let's look at her competition in the last two years of her legendary Act II.

1987

the nominees were...

Cher, MoonstruckGlenn Close, Fatal AttractionHolly Hunter, Broadcast NewsSally Kirkland, AnnaMeryl Streep, Ironweed

I've always loved that "Mary Louise" exchange. But is Cher rewriting history to claim Silkwood as her first movie or
See full article at FilmExperience »

Karl Malden Dies

Karl Malden, whose acting career spanned seven decades, has died peacefully at home in Hollywood, at the ripe old age of 97.Malden was a character actor of the old school; his weathered face and bulbous nose (broken playing basketball and football) instantly recognisable. He worked opposite Marlon Brando three times, in A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront and the troubled western One Eyed Jacks, and had substantial roles in Birdman of Alcatraz and Patton.He won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for Streetcar, and was nominated for On the Waterfront. He was given the Screen Actor's Guild's Lifetime Achievement Award in 1993 and was a past president of The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.Movie audiences hadn't seen him since the 1987 Barbra Streisand vehicle Nuts, but he was lured out of retirement occasionally, appearing in The West Wing in 2000, and in a TV movie return to his Emmy-winning
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Karl Malden passes away

Actor Karl Malden has died of natural causes at the age of 97. He is survived by his wife of 70 years, Mona, two daughters, three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Malden worked as an actor for both television, theater and film for seven decades, with his last credited performance as a priest in an episode of The West Wing nine years ago. He won an Oscar for Best Supporting Performance in the 1952 adaptation of A Streetcar Named Desire for director Elia Kazan and later an Emmy for his work in a 1984 made-for-television movie, Fatal Vision. He was also an active supporter of his profession by serving on the boards of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Screen Actors Guild and then serving as the Academy's president for the years 1989 to 1991. In 2003 Malden was awarded with the Screen Actors' Guild's Life Achievement Award for his work in entertainment as
See full article at Corona's Coming Attractions »

Oscar winner Karl Malden dies at 97

Karl Malden, who vaulted to movie prominence by winning an Academy Award for best supporting actor in "A Streetcar Named Desire" but who is perhaps best known for his lead role on 1970s TV series "The Streets of San Francisco," died Wednesday of natural causes at home in Brentwood. He was 97.

With his craggy face and bulbous nose -- he liked to say he had "an open-hearth face" -- Malden didn't possess matinee-idol looks, but he projected a familiarity and a fire that made him identifiable as an average guy who could rise to the occasion. Audiences respected him for his down-to-earth, lunchpail style.

His collaborations with Marlon Brando and director Elia Kazan, both lifelong friends, resulted in his "Streetcar" Oscar for playing Brando's pal Mitch and a supporting actor nomination three years later for his portrayal of Father Barry, who counsels Brando's character to stand up to the dock racketeers in "On the Waterfront.
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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