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Months of Meryl: Ironweed (1987)

John and Matthew are watching every single live-action film starring Meryl Streep.

#14 — Helen Archer, a dying homeless alcoholic.

John: Behold, the most devastating sequel to Heartburn imaginable. Directed by Hector Babenco and adapted by William Kennedy from his own Pulitzer-winning novel, Ironweed follows Francis (Jack Nicholson) and Helen (Streep), two homeless drifters biding their time and eking out their lives in Depression-era Albany. At nearly two and a half hours long, Ironweed is a bleak, wrenching study of poverty with nary a promise of redemption in sight. We’re talking about a movie whose most uplifting and musical scene is chased with a crushing dose of hopeless reality, a movie in which dogs assail a woman’s frozen corpse outside a church, digging graves is considered a good day’s work, and ramshackle vagrants pray they drink enough liquor to die in their sleep. It’s a tough sell and an even tougher sit,
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Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]
Like the other acting winners of the 1980s, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor went to big stars and character actors alike. The ’80s featured big-name winners like Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Sean Connery and Michael Caine alongside hardworking veterans like John Gielgud, Louis Gossett Jr. and Don Ameche. The Academy also rewarded emerging talent, like Timothy Hutton, Haing S. Ngor and the now double-champ Denzel Washington.

So who is your favorite Best Supporting Actor winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Hutton came out of the gate strong with his heartbreaking performance in Best Picture winner “Ordinary People.” Hutton plays Conrad Jarrett, a teenager wracked with guilt after his brother is killed in a boating accident. Hutton is clearly the lead of the film, but at age 20, the studio may have felt it fairer
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]
The 1980s saw several legendary dames winning Best Actress at the Oscars, including academy favorites like Katharine Hepburn and Meryl Streep. The entire decade was a good one for women dominating their films, like Sissy Spacek, Shirley MacLaine, Sally Field, Geraldine Page, Cher and Jodie Foster. The ’80s also set records that still stand today, with Marlee Matlin being the youngest Best Actress winner at age 21 and Jessica Tandy being the oldest winner at 80.

So which Best Actress winner from the ’80s is your favorite? Look back on each of their performances and vote in our poll below.

Sissy Spacek, “Coal Miner’s Daughter” (1980) — The ’80s began with Spacek earning her Oscar for playing country music star Loretta Lynn in the biopic “Coal Miner’s Daughter.” Spacek earned a previous nomination for “Carrie” (1976) and four subsequent nominations, for: “Missing” (1982), “The River” (1984), “Crimes of the Heart” (1986) and “In the Bedroom” (2001).

SEE
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Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)

Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)
Over the past month, the Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars has looked back at Meryl Streep’s 21 Oscar nominations, including her 2018 bid for “The Post.” We have considered the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

For a film buff and awards season aficionado, there is perhaps no more exhilarating a journey than going back to revisit all 21 Streep performances that brought her to the Oscars, plus her competition over the years – a grand total of 105 performances, most richly deserving of their recognition.

While Streep has three Academy Awards — for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979), “Sophie’s Choice” (1982) and “The Iron Lady” (2011) — a case could surely be made that she has deserved even more. She is at her career-best in “The Bridges of Madison County” (1995) and, if not for the juggernaut that was Shirley MacLaine in “Terms of Endearment
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep (‘The Post’) loses at Oscars for 18th time, crushing her own record

Meryl Streep (‘The Post’) loses at Oscars for 18th time, crushing her own record
Over the past four decades Meryl Streep has amassed 21 Oscar nominations, more than any performer in Academy Awards history. She won three of those races, making her a member of the exclusive three-timers club of which there are only two other living members: Daniel Day-Lewis and Jack Nicholson. However, there’s a unique downside to Queen Meryl’s Oscar reign. After losing Best Actress for “The Post” Sunday night to Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Streep now has 18 Oscar failures on her hands, extending her record as the biggest acting loser of all time.

SEE2018 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 90th Academy Awards [Updating Live]

Streep’s losses straddle 39 years, including 15 as Best Actress and 3 as Best Supporting Actress. Her first loss for “The Deer Hunter” (1978) happened four decades ago, setting the stage for a remarkable Oscar trajectory full of a few ups and many, many downs.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Best Picture presenters should be Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep (even though she stars in a nominee)

2018 Oscars: Best Picture presenters should be Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep (even though she stars in a nominee)
To celebrate the 90th anniversary of the Academy Awards, the two all-time nominations champs (and two-time co-stars) Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep should hand out Best Picture on March 4. Yes, Streep stars in one of the nine nominees, “The Post.” But does anyone really think that film will win?

While Nicholson has been the academy’s go-to guy for this award a record eight times, Streep — who has starred in a couple of Best Picture champs (“Kramer versus Kramer” and “Out of Africa”) — has never had a turn. Sure, she has presented other awards, both honorary and competitive, but surely it is time for her to be given this honor, especially in the year in which she reaped her 21st Oscar nomination. And with her headline-making speeches, viewers are sure to stay tuned to the end of the show to see if Streep once again goes after Donald Trump.

Nicholson
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Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Post,’ ‘Sophie’s Choice,’ ‘Adaptation’

  • Gold Derby
Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Post,’ ‘Sophie’s Choice,’ ‘Adaptation’
Is Meryl Streep the greatest film actor of all time? That might just be the case judging from her record 21 Oscar nominations. Then again, with three wins she trails Katharine Hepburn, who still holds the record with four acting victories, so Streep still has a big brass ring to reach for if she wants to be the undisputed queen of screen actors. She earned her latest bid this year for her leading role as Washington Post publisher Kay Graham in Steven Spielberg‘s “The Post.” Where does her latest entry rank in her filmography? Even though it seems like she’s nominated for just about every performance she gives it’s not just those Oscar-anointed roles that count among her strongest achievements. Tour through our photo gallery above of Streep’s 25 greatest performances ranked from worst to best.

See Meryl Streep joins ‘Big Little Lies’ season 2 – will she win her fourth Emmy?
See full article at Gold Derby »

Months of Meryl: Sophie's Choice (1982)

Hi, we’re John and Matt and, icymi, we are watching every single live-action film starring Streep...

#8 — Sophie Zawistowska, a Polish Holocaust survivor now fighting back personal demons as a Brooklyn émigré.

John: Meryl Streep is as defined by Sophie’s Choice as Tiffany's is by diamonds. Her “choice” is perhaps the most notorious scene in Streep’s oeuvre, known by people who have no idea that The Deer Hunter or Silkwood or Ironweed even exist. In only our eighth entry, we have already arrived at the performance in which the legend of Streep was crystallized forever...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Meryl Streep in ‘Doubt’: A look back at her 15th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘Doubt’: A look back at her 15th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 15 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

On the heels of the spectacular box office success of “The Devil Wears Prada” (2006), Meryl Streep was more a household name than ever. Even teens and twentysomethings who weren’t terribly familiar with Streep’s body of work could now instantly identify the actress who made Miranda Priestly a big screen icon. She quickly hopped aboard three projects for 2007, all of which screamed ‘Oscar contender’ on paper and unfortunately, all of which underperformed upon release.

First, there was “Evening,” a supremely sleepy drama which, despite the presence of heavyweights including Streep, Glenn Close, Claire Danes and Vanessa Redgrave, failed to leave
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘A Cry in the Dark’: A look back at her eighth Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘A Cry in the Dark’: A look back at her eighth Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 8 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

When Meryl Streep first collaborated with filmmaker Fred Schepisi, reaction to their work was decidedly muted. “Plenty” (1985) came and went from theaters in no time, spending all of one week in the box office top 10. In 1987, both Streep and Schepisi had better luck, the former contending at the Academy Award for her turn in “Ironweed” and the latter directing the popular Steve Martin comedy “Roxanne.”

In 1988, Streep and Schepisi gave collaboration another shot. While “A Cry in the Dark,” adapted from John Bryson‘s book “Evil Angels” (1985), was hardly a crowd-pleaser, the picture and Streep’s performance garnered abundant critical acclaim. The film would mark
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Ironweed’: A look back at her seventh Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘Ironweed’: A look back at her seventh Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 7 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

On paper, “Heartburn” (1986) had the sound of a surefire smash. The picture reunited the talented trio from “Silkwood” (1983) – leading lady Meryl Streep, director Mike Nichols and screenwriter Nora Ephron. Production on the film hit a snag early on, as Nichols, seeing no magic between he and Streep, fired leading man Mandy Patinkin after mere days of shooting. Things would presumably still be A-ok, however, if not better, considering Patinkin’s replacement was none other than Jack Nicholson, hot as ever with his Academy Awards victory for “Terms of Endearment” (1983) and success the year prior with “Prizzi’s Honor” (1985).

That summer, “Heartburn” hit theaters to reviews
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Is Meryl Streep the greatest film performer of all time? According to Oscar voters over the past 40 years, that might just be the case with her record shattering 21 nominations and 3 wins. She earned her latest bid for the 2017 film “The Post” for portraying “Washington Post” publisher Kay Graham in the Steven Spielberg movie. Where does her latest entry rank in her filmography? Tour through our photo gallery above of Streep’s 25 greatest performances ranked from worst to best.

Streep snagged her first Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress for “The Deer Hunter” (1978) and picked up her first trophy in that category the very next year for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979). She subsequently snagged two prizes in the lead category (“Sophie’s Choice” in 1982 and “The Iron Lady” in 2011) and competed 17 more times: Best Actress for “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” (1981), “Silkwood” (1983), “Out of Africa” (1985), “Ironweed” (1987), “A Cry in the Dark” (1988), “Postcards from the Edge
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1990s include some of the most legendary actors in film history, like Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Tom Hanks and Jack Nicholson. We’ve also seen actors springboard off their victories to have fruitful careers in film, like Geoffrey Rush and Nicolas Cage. Now, two decades later, which do you consider the greatest Best Actor winner of the 1990s?

Refamiliarize yourself with the winners and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actor.)

Jeremy Irons, “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) — The ’90s began with Jeremy Irons being awarded for “Reverse of Fortune,” in which the actor plays Claus von Bulow, a man charged with attempted murder after his wife goes into diabetic shock. Despite a long career in film this remains Irons’ only nomination and win, though he has won two Emmys for voiceover work and another for his performance in 2005’s “Elizabeth I.
See full article at Gold Derby »

John Morris, ‘Blazing Saddles’ and ‘Young Frankenstein’ Composer, Dies at 91

John Morris, Oscar-nominated, Emmy-winning composer for many of the classic Mel Brooks comedies including “Blazing Saddles” and “Young Frankenstein,” died Thursday at his home in Red Hook, N.Y. He was 91.

Morris was Oscar-nominated for co-writing, with Brooks, the title song for “Blazing Saddles” – a sendup of classic movie cowboy tunes sung by Frankie Laine for the opening of Brooks’ 1974 film. Morris was nominated again in 1980 for his dramatic score for the Brooks-produced “The Elephant Man.”

Morris served as Brooks’ composer beginning with “The Producers” in 1967; he wrote the original arrangement for Brooks’ famous “Springtime for Hitler” song, and composed the rest of the underscore.

Morris’ most famous score is undoubtedly “Young Frankenstein,” for which he composed a memorable violin theme that plays a key role in the story. Under the title “Transylvanian Lullaby,” it has even been performed by top classical artists from violinist Gil Shaham to the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

The composer
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Meryl Streep Breaks Own Record With 21st Oscar Nomination

Meryl Streep Breaks Own Record With 21st Oscar Nomination
Meryl Streep has broken her own Oscar record.

The actress received her 21st Academy Award nomination, in the best actress category, for her performance as Katherine Graham in “The Post.”

The nod extends Streep’s record by nine over Katharine Hepburn and Jack Nicholson, who are tied in second place with a dozen each.

Streep has won Oscars for “Kramer vs. Kramer” in 1979, “Sophie’s Choice” in 1982, and “The Iron Lady” in 2011. She’s received four nominations since then for “August: Osage County,” “Into the Woods,” “Florence Foster Jenkins,” and now “The Post.”

Streep also nabbed a Golden Globe nomination for best actress in a drama for “The Post,” but lost to “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” star Frances McDormand.

Her performance as the widowed Graham has been widely praised for its nuance as her character deals with the fallout from her 1971 decision for The Washington Post to publish the Pentagon Papers in the face of opposition
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Meryl Streep Hilariously Fails at Naming All 20 of the Films That Earned Her Oscar Nominations

Meryl Streep Hilariously Fails at Naming All 20 of the Films That Earned Her Oscar Nominations
Meryl Streep holds the record for the most Academy Award nominations of any actor, but can she list all 20 of the films she earned nods for?

Jimmy Kimmel challenged the three-time Oscar winner, 68, to name all of the movies she was nominated for in 60 seconds during Monday’s Jimmy Kimmel Live!, and the results were hilarious.

“If you’re able to name them, I will give you this bonus Oscar,” the late-night host, who is hosting this year’s awards show, told Streep.

The Post star kicked off the game on a strong start, naming The French Lieutenant’s Woman,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘My Days of Mercy’ Review: Ellen Page and Kate Mara Find Love Across Party Lines in Heavy-Handed Capital-Punishment Drama — Tiff

‘My Days of Mercy’ Review: Ellen Page and Kate Mara Find Love Across Party Lines in Heavy-Handed Capital-Punishment Drama — Tiff
Of all the possible twists in the star-crossed -overs genre, falling in love across the chain link fences dividing pro– and anti–death penalty activists is nothing if not novel. Throw in the wrench of sexual awakening, class differences, and the impending death of a parent, and you’ve got a lot of issues to handle in a single movie. The greatest triumph of “My Days of Mercy” is that it handles such heavy subject matter with grace and — mercifully — as light a touch as good taste will allow. Of course, that successful execution only goes so far in a lesbian romance about capital punishment. That’s a tough sell, no matter your politics.

Produced by stars Ellen Page and Kate Mara, along with Killer FilmsChristine Vachon, the film tells the story of a young activist named Lucy (Page) whose life is altered unimaginably by a tragedy that landed her father on death row.
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Meryl Streep Makes History with 20th Oscar Nom: A Look Back at Her Iconic Nominated Roles

  • PEOPLE.com
Meryl Streep Makes History with 20th Oscar Nom: A Look Back at Her Iconic Nominated Roles
Last year, Meryl Streep received her 20th Academy Award nomination for her performance in Florence Foster Jenkins. Streep’s nod makes her the most nominated performer in Oscars history.

In honor of Streep’s incredible feat (which she celebrated with an epic gif of her dancing; see below), we’re looking back at the roles that got her the accolades.

via Giphy

(We’re just as excited as you, Meryl!)

1979: The Deer Hunter

Though she didn’t win for her turn as the girlfriend of a fallen soldier in Vietnam, the role helped establish Streep as one to watch in the awards show game,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

From the People Archives: Celebrate Author Robert James Waller’s Legacy with a Look Back at the Bridges of Madison County Movie

From the People Archives: Celebrate Author Robert James Waller’s Legacy with a Look Back at the Bridges of Madison County Movie
Celebrated author Robert James Waller has died at the age of 77. Take a look back at People’s 1995 cover story on Meryl Streep and her emotional role in the film adaptation of Waller’s The Bridges of Madison County.

In the final days of the five-week shoot of The Bridges of Madison County last fall, Meryl Streep did one of the many things she does better onscreen than anyone else: she cried. Filming an emotional scene in which her character struggles to say goodbye to her lover, the actress would show up on the set in Winterset, Iowa, at 9 in
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The 2017 Oscar Nominees: Everything you need to know about the Best Actress race

  • Cineplex
The 2017 Oscar Nominees: Everything you need to know about the Best Actress race The 2017 Oscar Nominees: Everything you need to know about the Best Actress race Adriana Floridia2/10/2017 11:36:00 Am

This year's Best Actress race is extremely competitive.

Some of our favourite performances couldn't secure the nomination, and it was simply because there were so many incredible female performances. We're sad that names like Annette Bening for 20th Century Women, Amy Adams for Arrival and Hailee Steinfeld for The Edge of Seventeen weren't among the nominees, but we also love the five nominated performances so much. Seriously, it was just a great year for women acting in film, and with the talent out there today, it's always going to be hard, and therefore even more of an honour, to land that Oscar nomination.

Though there's five women in the running here, the race has been pretty much narrowed down to two major threats.
See full article at Cineplex »
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