Five Corners (1987) - News Poster

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New to Streaming: ‘Alien: Covenant,’ ‘Shin Godzilla,’ ‘Adaptation,’ ‘Slack Bay,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Adaptation (Spike Jonze)

It’s almost depressing to rewatch Adaptation in 2016, because it’s a reminder of how strong an actor Nicolas Cage is when he actually invests himself in good projects. It was soon after this that his career went off the rails, but he’s remarkably impressive here, playing the dual roles of Charlie Kaufman and his fictional twin brother, Donald. As much a mind-fuck as any other Kaufman screenplay,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Italian-American actor-director John Turturro, who stars in Richard Price and Steve Zaillian’s widely hailed limited series “The Night Of” (HBO).

Bottom Line: For 37 years, versatile New York actor John Turturro has delivered memorable characters who can be incredibly smart (“Quiz Show”) or insanely stupid (bowler Jesus Quintano in “The Big Lebowski”), lovable (“Fading Gigolo”) or menacing (the pool hustler in Martin Scorsese’s “The Color Of Money”). He’s a go-to player for both the Coens and Spike Lee as well as a reliable character actor for Hollywood tentpoles such as “The Transformers.”

Career Peaks: After winning a scholarship to the Yale Drama School and performing Ibsen, Ionesco, and John Patrick Shanley off-Broadway, Turturro got stuck playing violent killers in films like “Five Corners
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Italian-American actor-director John Turturro, who stars in Richard Price and Steve Zaillian’s widely hailed limited series “The Night Of” (HBO).

Bottom Line: For 37 years, versatile New York actor John Turturro has delivered memorable characters who can be incredibly smart (“Quiz Show”) or insanely stupid (bowler Jesus Quintano in “The Big Lebowski”), lovable (“Fading Gigolo”) or menacing (the pool hustler in Martin Scorsese’s “The Color Of Money”). He’s a go-to player for both the Coens and Spike Lee as well as a reliable character actor for Hollywood tentpoles such as “The Transformers.”

Career Peaks: After winning a scholarship to the Yale Drama School and performing Ibsen, Ionesco, and John Patrick Shanley off-Broadway, Turturro got stuck playing violent killers in films like “Five Corners
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

All of the Films Joining FilmStruck’s Criterion Channel this August

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This August will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Tuesday, August 1

Tuesday’s Short + Feature: These Boots and Mystery Train

Music is at the heart of this program, which pairs a zany music video by Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki with a tune-filled career highlight from American independent-film pioneer Jim Jarmusch. In the 1993 These Boots, Kaurismäki’s band of pompadoured “Finnish Elvis” rockers, the Leningrad Cowboys, cover a Nancy Sinatra classic in their signature deadpan style. It’s the perfect prelude to Jarmusch’s 1989 Mystery Train, a homage to the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll and the musical legacy of Memphis, featuring appearances by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Joe Strummer.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Joe versus the Volcano

“May you live to be a thousand years old, sir.” Still the most widely unheralded great movie on the books, John Patrick Shanley’s lightweight/profound fable is an unmitigated delight. See Tom Hanks at the end of the first phase of his career plus Meg Ryan in an unacknowledged career highlight. How can a movie be so purposely insubstantial, and yet be ‘heavier’ than a dozen pictures with ‘big things to say?’

Joe Versus the Volcano

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1990 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 97 min. / Street Date June 20, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Lloyd Bridges, Robert Stack, Abe Vigoda,

Dan Hedaya, Barry McGovern, Amanda Plummer, Ossie Davis

Cinematography Stephen Goldblatt

Production Designer Bo Welch

Film Editors Richard Halsey, Kenneth Wannberg

Original Music Georges Delerue

Produced by Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall, Steven Spielberg and Teri Schwartz

Written and Directed by John Patrick Shanley

I think I found
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

NYC Weekend Watch: Akerman, Hou, Wiseman, Mekas, ‘Rocco and His Brothers’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

To commemorate her passing, free screenings of Chantal Akerman‘s Jeanne Dielman (on 35mm) and her self-portrait Chantal Akerman by Chantal Akerman will screen for free on Friday.

Hou Hsiao-hsien‘s The Boys from Fengkuei will play on Friday night, with Hou making an appearance.

Museum of the Moving
See full article at The Film Stage »

Why 1988 was the best year in movie history

  • Hitfix
Why 1988 was the best year in movie history
All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century. Click here for a complete list of our essays. While I tend to think of the '80s as a crassly commercial lull between the artistic adventurousness of the '70s and the independent experimentation of the '90s, there were things about the '80s that i hold dear in terms of what I love about movies. And if you're talking about the best of the '80s, the year that crystallized all the things the decade did well was 1988, a year that looks upon closer inspection like an embarrassment of riches. One of my twenty favorite films of all time, as outlined in this article, was released in 1988, which automatically makes it a year worth closer consideration. The '80s may have begun with one of his strongest films, but
See full article at Hitfix »

'Copper' Season 2: 'History is our guide, not our master'

A musty odor of manure, muddy straw and vegetables long since spoiled heightens the realistic feel of squalor.

On the massive Toronto set of "Copper," the details of Manhattan's Five Points in 1865 are precise down to the brush on the madam's vanity and Hebrew lettering on the pawnshop window.

In the mansion part of the soundstage, in front of a working fireplace, co-creator and executive producer Tom Fontana ("Oz," "Homicide: Life on the Street") and new showrunner Thomas Kelly ("Blue Bloods") chat about the changes for BBC America's original drama, which returns with 13 episodes for Season 2 on Sunday, June 23.

"As always the center of the universe is Corcoran," Fontana tells Zap2it. "He is trying to be a moral cop in an immoral society. He is trying to be a moral friend. A new element arrives in Five Points, in the person of Donovan."

Donal Logue ("Vikings," "Sons of Anarchy") is Gen.
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Jodie Foster: Hot Hollywood Celebrity Photo Gallery of the Day

HollywoodNews.com: Our selected celebrity to be included in our “Hot Hollywood Celebrity Photo Gallery of the Day” is Jodie Foster. She just premiered her new movie “The Beaver” in Cannes.

Jodie Foster ◄ Back Next ►Picture 1 of 11

Jodie Foster - 64th Annual Cannes Film Festival - "The Beaver"

◄ Back Next ►Picture 1 of 11

Jodie Foster - 64th Annual Cannes Film Festival - "The Beaver"

Alicia Christian “Jodie” Foster (born November 19, 1962) is an American actress, film director, producer as well as being a former child actress.

Foster began acting in commercials at three years of age, and her first significant role came in the 1976 film Taxi Driver as the preteen prostitute Iris for which she received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Also that year, she starred in the cult film The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane. She won an Academy Award for Best Actress in
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

New this Week: ‘The Eagle,’ ‘Just Go with It’ and ‘Life as We Know It (DVD)’

Hitting movie theaters this weekend:

The EagleChanning Tatum, Jamie Bell, Donald Sutherland

Gnomeo and Juliet – James McAvoy, Emily Blunt, Maggie Smith

Just Go with ItAdam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston, Brooklyn Decker

Justin Bieber: Never Say NeverJustin Bieber, Boys II Men, Miley Cyrus

In Her SkinGuy Pearce, Sam Neill, Miranda Otto (limited)

Movie of the Week

The Eagle

The Stars: Channing Tatum, Jamie Bell, Donald Sutherland

The Plot: In Roman-ruled Britain, a young Roman soldier endeavors to honor his father’s memory by finding his lost legion’s golden emblem.

The Buzz: It didn’t blow me away, but the trailer for The Eagle did make me want to check this one out in the theater. The cinematography and filming locales of The Eagle look to be fantastic. The score in the trailer was fairly derivative; standard music to augment the excitement and adventure that such a film promises.
See full article at Scorecard Review »

Alejandro Amenabar's "Tesis" Statement and More New on DVD

  • IFC
A look at what's new on DVD today:

"Tesis" (1996)

Directed by Alejandro Amenabar

Released by Widowmaker Films

Long out of print, "The Others" director Alejandro Amenabar's debut about a grad student's discovery of a snuff film is being remastered and rereleased by Widowmaker Films.

"Alice in Murderland" (2011)

Directed by Dennis Devine

Released by Brain Damage Films

A year after Tim Burton's "Alice in Wonderland" scared the bejeezus out of kids in multiplexes everywhere, this horror take on Lewis Carroll's classic fairy tale aims to do so intentionally on DVD players around the country.

"America, America" (1963)

Directed by Elia Kazan

Released by Fox Home Entertainment

Elia Kazan's most personal film based on the story of his uncle's immigration to the United States from Turkey, where as a Greek his family is persecuted, was already released as part of last year's Kazan boxed set, but now will be
See full article at IFC »

Paul Thomas Anderson Interviews Philip Seymour Hoffman About Jack Goes Boating

Monday Night in Los Angeles, Paul Thomas Anderson moderated a Q&A with Philip Seymour Hoffman after a special screening of Hoffman’s directorial debut Jack Goes Boating. The film, which premiered at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival, is about a lonely limo driver named Jack (Hoffman) and a relationship he forms with a funeral saleswoman named Connie, played by Amy Ryan. The film is a very subtle and effective character study about relationships, love, friendship and much more. Hit the jump to read what these frequent collaborates had to say about the film, which opens in limited release September 23.

As the pair, who have worked together on three films not including their upcoming collaboration The Master (which was not brought up), sat down, Anderson remarked that he was having a hard time taking this seriously.

First, he asked Hoffman where the film came from. Jack Goes Boating is based on
See full article at Collider.com »

Doubt DVD Release: Interview with John Patrick Shanley

Doubt has arrived on DVD from Miramax Home Video with a Director's Commentary from John Patrick Shanley, plus four featurettes: "Scoring Doubt," "The Cast of Doubt," "The Sisters of Charity," and "Doubt: From Stage to Screen." Here is Terry Keefe's in-depth interview with writer-director John Patrick Shanley which originally appeared in the December 2008 issue of Venice Magazine.

A Conversation with John Patrick Shanley on the making of Doubt, the origins of Moonstruck, and the dire fate of his first novel.

By Terry Keefe

It’s hard to believe that it’s been 21 years since John Patrick Shanley’s screenplay for Moonstruck made a whole generation of moviegoers want to move to Little Italy, marry Cher or Nicolas Cage, Danny Aiello even, and look for the mythical Cosmo’s Moon. The young Shanley had already been having a good career run at that point, with a number of successful Off-Broadway plays,
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

"Doubt" - Blu-ray review. Bonus features are limited as would be expected but extremely intuitive.

"Doubt" Blu-ray Reviewby Peter Dimako, Editor The “Doubt” Blu-ray review. By Peter Dimako, Editor“Doubt” is a powerfully acted drama which moves along at a good pace considering the heavy material, making the film easy to watch. John Patrick Shanley returns to the helm after an eighteen year hiatus; his last film “Joe vs. The Volcano” was on the opposite side of the genre spectrum; an adventurous comedy with Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. The director helms and adapts the screenplay based on his own play.Meryl Streep undoubtedly dominates the screen, overpowering Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams’ performances. Oscar®-nominated for her part, Streep stars as Sister Aloysius Beauvier, a nun known for her fear-driven, stern running of the St. Nicholas School in the Bronx. It’s 1964, a time of change and the school has accepted its first black student in Donald Miller (Joseph Foster).Father Brendan Flynn
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

WGAE to honor John Patrick Shanley

Film writer and playwright John Patrick Shanley, who wrote the Oscar-nominated adaptation of his play "Doubt," will be honored with the WGA East's Ian McLellan Hunter Award for career writing achievements.

He will be feted at the 61st annual WGA Awards at the Millennium Hotel's Hudson Theatre in New York on Feb. 7.

"John's ability to create and tell a compelling story, building not only from imagination but from vivid memory and experience, are profoundly worthy of the award and its namesake," Wgae president Michael Winship said.

Shanley's "Doubt" script has also drawn a WGA nomination for best adapted screenplay. His original screenplays include an Oscar-winning script for 1987's "Moonstruck," as well as scripts for "Five Corners" (1988) "The January Man" (1989) and "Joe Versus The Volcano" (1990), which he also directed. He wrote the adapted screenplay for 1993's "Alive."

Previous winners of the Hunter award include 2007 recipient Andrew Berman ("The In-Laws"). No recipient was named last year.
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Review: Doubt

As many movie fans know by now, the prologue to last summer's Tropic Thunder features some brilliant spoof trailers, including one for a phony film called Satan's Alley (which won the "coveted Crying Monkey Award at the Beijing Film Festival"). Better seen than described, it's a brilliant deconstruction of every pompous award-hungry film that comes out in December. The trailer for John Patrick Shanley's Doubt looks a lot like that, but if I've learned one thing this year, it's to not trust trailers. Happily, the real Doubt is a great deal sprightlier, cleverer and more powerful than its dreadful promo would suggest.

Shanley is a playwright who occasionally forays into movies, and he adapted his own 2004 play into the screenplay for Doubt. He won a Best Screenplay Oscar for Moonstruck (1987), and his other writing work ranges from Five Corners (1987) to an adaptation of Congo (1995). As a director, Doubt is
See full article at Cinematical »

"Doubt" review - Meryl Streep is the perfect villain.

Doubtby Steve Ramos, Writer Meryl Streep is the perfect villain in suspenseful ‘Doubt’ If esteemed film critic Pauline Kael were still alive, watching and reviewing movies, I imagine she would pounce all over Meryl Streep for her performance in “Doubt” as villainous Sister Aloysius, a Bronx school principal and Catholic nun in 1964, convinced that a young priest, Father Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman), molested a male student. Kael frequently accused Streep of playacting, of emphasizing foreign accents and changes in her physical appearance instead of more natural performances. With “Doubt,” the most intimate of the year- end, prestige releases, a period film drama that’s nearly perfect, Kael would have targeted Streep’s Irish lilt, wire-framed spectacles and black bonnet and cloak. Kael would have criticized Streep for once again playing dress up but in the case of writer/director John Patrick Shanley’s “Doubt,” an adaptation of his acclaimed stage play,
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

See also

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