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Trailer Binge: ‘Searching’, ‘Climax’, ‘Shock and Awe’, Whitney’ & ‘Axl’

Welcome to Trailer Binge, a recurring feature where we get a chance to catch up on some of the recent trailer releases in the past week. Whether it be indie releases, or recent movie and TV trailers that may have otherwise slipped through the cracks, Trailer Binge allows us to catch up on the seemingly constant onslaught of new new content being released each week.

In this edition of Trailer Binge, we take a look at trailers for the new John Cho sundance hit ‘Searching‘, a teaser trailer for Gaspar Noé‘s latest film ‘Climax’, and a trailer for the latest Rob Reiner film ‘Shock and Awe‘. Plus, we have trailers for the new Kevin MacDonald documentary ‘Whitney‘ and a trailer for the crazy-looking ‘Axl‘. Let the binge begin!

‘Searching’ Trailer

‘Searching‘ was written and directed by Aneesh Chaganty. The film Stars John Cho and hits theaters on August 3, 2018.

After
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

A.X.L. Official Trailer Has Arrived! In Theaters August 24th

On behalf of Global Road Entertainment, we’re excited to share the New Trailer for A.X.L. this summer’s must-see family adventure starring Alex Neustaedter and Becky G!

Don’t miss this timeless, epic movie for the whole family, and see how a down-on-his luck teenage bike rider forms an emotional bond with an advanced, robotic, military dog named A.X.L. In the vein of classic ’80s family movies Short Circuit and Flight Of The Navigator, A.X.L. is a new adventure about a down-on-his luck teenage bike rider, Miles (Alex Neustaedter), who stumbles upon an advanced, robotic, military dog named A.X.L. Endowed with next-generation artificial intelligence but with the heart of a dog, A.X.L. forms an emotional bond with Miles, much to the chagrin of the rogue military scientists who created A.X.L. and would do anything to retrieve him.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Trailer For the 80s Inspired Sci-Fi Film A.X.L Follows a Boy and His Robot Dog

The first trailer has been released for a sci-fi family film called A.X.L, which is said to be inspired by classic 80s films such as Short Circuit and Flight of the Navigator. The story basically revolves around a kid who finds an advanced robot dog in a junkyard and they form a bond and embark on an adventure together. Here's the synopsis: 

A.X.L. is a new adventure about a down-on-his luck teenage bike rider, Miles (Alex Neustaedter), who stumbles upon an advanced, robotic, military dog named A.X.L. Endowed with next-generation artificial intelligence but with the heart of a dog, A.X.L. forms an emotional bond with Miles, much to the chagrin of the rogue military scientists who created A.X.L. and would do anything to retrieve him. Knowing what is at stake if A.X.L. gets captured, Miles teams up with his smart,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

First Trailer for Sci-Fi Robot Dog Movie 'Axl' Starring Alex Neustaedter

"That's my dog - I want it back." Global Road Entertainment has debuted the first official trailer for Oliver Daly's new movie Axl, or A.X.L., about a giant robot dog that becomes friends with a teenager kid. It's inspired by classic 80's family sci-fi movies like Short Circuit and Flight of the Navigator, adapted directly from Daly's own short film Miles, and is more of a kids movie (or "family movie") than an edgy sci-fi concept or action movie like Michael Bay would make. Alex Neustaedter stars as Miles, along with Becky G, Dorian Kingi (as Axl), Eric Etebari, Niko Guardado, Patricia De Leon, Alex MacNicoll, and Madeline Bertani. This is a cheesy trailer with the music, but I have a feeling this might be a cool film - even though it's meant for younger audiences, seems like good fun. Here's the first official trailer (+ poster) for Oliver Daly's Axl,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Man’s best friend has evolved in trailer for A.X.L.

A poster and trailer have debuted for the upcoming family adventure A.X.L. Written and directed by Oliver Daly, the film stars Alex Neustaedter as a down on his luck teenager who forms an unlikely bind with a robotic military dog, alongside Becky G and Alex MacNicoll; check them out here…

In the vein of classic ’80s family movies Short Circuit and Flight Of The Navigator, A.X.L. is a new adventure about a down-on-his luck teenage bike rider, Miles (Alex Neustaedter), who stumbles upon an advanced, robotic, military dog named A.X.L. Endowed with next-generation artificial intelligence but with the heart of a dog, A.X.L. forms an emotional bond with Miles, much to the chagrin of the rogue military scientists who created A.X.L. and would do anything to retrieve him. Knowing what is at stake if A.X.L. gets captured, Miles teams up with his smart,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Marketing Executive Eddie Kalish Dies at 79

Veteran marketing executive Eddie Kalish died April 20 in Escondido, Calif. following a brief battle with cancer. He was 79.

Kalish graduated from Bard College and worked as a journalist covering the film and music industry before moving into marketing and publicity.

He met his wife Gillian while working as unit publicist and unit photographer on the film “The Southern Star,” on which she was the animal wrangler.

Kalish was a top marketing executive for Paramount and MGM/Ya in New York. In 1982 he moved to Los Angeles as senior VP of worldwide marketing for Producers Sales Organization (Pso), where he oversaw global campaigns for films including “Never Say Never Again,” “Short Circuit,” “The Cotton Club,” “Prizzi’s Honor,” “Buckaroo Banzai” and “9 1/2 Weeks.”

Partnering with publicity exec Dennis Davidson, the duo founded Kalish Davidson marketing in 1987, working with companies including Alliance Atlantis, Mayfair Entertainment, McEg, Mdp International, Mutual Film Co., Nelson Entertainment,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Eddie Kalish, Longtime Hollywood Marketing Executive, Dies at 78

Veteran marketing executive Eddie Kalish died Friday at a hospital in Escondido, California, following a brief battle with cancer, publicist Pamela Godwin-Austen announced. He was 78.

After heading the marketing divisions at Paramount, United Artists and MGM/UA in New York starting in 1979, Kalish came to Los Angeles in 1982 to join Mark Damon's Producers Sales Organization as senior vp worldwide marketing.

There, he spearheaded the global campaigns for films including Never Say Never Again (1983), The Cotton Club (1984), The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984), Prizzi's Honor (1985), Short Circuit (1986) and 9½ Weeks (1986). 

...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “Kindergarten Cop”

Kindergarten Cop was a big deal in the Pacific Northwest at one point, kind of like The Goonies but not quite as popular. The reason for this was that it was filmed in Astoria, Oregon, which is also where The Goonies and another film, Short Circuit, happened to have visited during filming. A lot of other cities are typically proud to host a number of film moments but the Pnw doesn’t always have big stars like Arnold Schwarzenegger rolling through trying to film a big motion picture. This one-time classic about a cop going undercover to become a kindergarten teacher

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “Kindergarten Cop
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Big accident: This popular actor’s studio catches fire!

The famous Annapurna Studios, established by Nageshwara Rao Akkineni (father of actor Nagarjuna) situated on Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, reportedly encountered a fire accident on Monday (November 13, 2017).

The studio reportedly caught fire at around 6:15 pm and though the flames were high, it is said that the fire was completely extinguished in about two hours with the help of four fire tenders. Short circuit is suspected to be the cause and the good news is that no one got hurt due to this fire that broke out at the Annapurna Studios established in 1975.

Based on a True Story: Why So Many Biopics Create Oscar Buzz But Become Box-Office Flops

  • Indiewire
Based on a True Story: Why So Many Biopics Create Oscar Buzz But Become Box-Office Flops
Fall is the season of Real-People movies — the biopics that often fuel Oscar hopes. Recent weeks brought “The Battle of the Sexes,” “Stronger,” and “Victoria & Abdul” and there’s more than a dozen to come, including “Marshall,” “The Post,” “Darkest Hour,” and “The Current War.” There’s good reason to believe that a biopic might produce awards. In the last five years, 28 of the 100 Oscar acting nominees played real-life characters, as did four of the 20 winners. But when it comes to the box office, the odds aren’t as kind.

Read More:With ‘Dunkirk’ and ‘Darkest Hour’ Showing Strong, Will Churchill-Heavy Britpics Storm the Oscars?

Since 2012, there have been about 100 biopics including hits like “The King’s Speech,” “The Social Network,” and “Julie and Julia.” But while recent years featured real-life characters and stories in some of the biggest non-franchise hits, the format may have reached a saturation point.

Last year,
See full article at Indiewire »

Benedict Cumberbatch Doesn’t Understand Why ‘Doctor Who’ and ‘Sherlock’ Can’t Have a Female Hero

Benedict Cumberbatch Doesn’t Understand Why ‘Doctor Who’ and ‘Sherlock’ Can’t Have a Female Hero
Earlier this year, BBC made a groundbreaking announcement when it revealed “Broadchurch” actress Jodie Whitaker would be the new lead on “Doctor Who,” making her the first female doctor since the series first began over 50 years ago. The news was a cause for celebration, but of course a certain section of the fandom was not too pleased the show was making a gender switch. Within hours of the announcement, the hashtags #NotMyDoctor and #NurseWho became the official slogans of the opposition. The months since have seen the BBC and previous Doctors defend Whitaker, and you can count fellow BBC favorite Benedict Cumberbatch among her most vocal supporters.

Read More:Benedict Cumberbatch to Executive Produce and Star in ‘Melrose’ for Showtime

“It’s an alien. Why can’t it be a woman? Why can’t it be any gender? It doesn’t matter to me,” Cumberbatch said to Variety. The actor
See full article at Indiewire »

‘I Love You, Daddy’ Review: In Louis C.K.’s Black-and-White Cringe Comedy, Everybody’s a Pervert — Tiff

‘I Love You, Daddy’ Review: In Louis C.K.’s Black-and-White Cringe Comedy, Everybody’s a Pervert — Tiff
“Everybody’s a pervert.” So says one woman to Glen (Louis C.K.) in “I Love You, Daddy,” C.K.’s sweeping black-and-white cringe comedy, but in this movie’s self-contained universe that’s a given, because everybody’s an extension of its lead character’s twisted perceptions.

As the writer, director and star, C.K. expands the awkward, introspective humor of his now-defunct F/X show to a grander cinematic terrain, but otherwise it may as well be an exuberant two-hour installment of that same program. Shot on glorious 35mm film with a wry style that emulates 40’s-era classic Hollywood, “I Love You Daddy” echoes Woody Allen’s “Manhattan” in that the vibrant, antiquated style strikes an odd contrast with its anti-hero — a neurotic, disaster-prone middle-aged man in the midst of self-destructive circumstances with little hope of redemption.

As with all of C.K.’s output, “I Love You, Daddy
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Brad’s Status’ Review: Ben Stiller Gives a Soulful Performance in Mike White’s Heartfelt Father-Son Tale — Tiff

‘Brad’s Status’ Review: Ben Stiller Gives a Soulful Performance in Mike White’s Heartfelt Father-Son Tale — Tiff
There’s a standout moment in “Brad’s Status” when Brad Sloan (Ben Stiller) sits down at a bar with a college-aged woman less than half his age who puts him in his place. After he spends hours drunkenly whining about his life’s work at a non-profit, expressing concerns that he never gets enough respect, she offers a succinct rejoinder that bursts his bubble in an instant. The scene epitomizes the movie’s appeal: Writer-director Mike White’s screenplay juggles warmth with a caustic edge that doesn’t only put Brad in his place; it sums up the essence of Stiller’s performances, giving a slew of solipsistic characters the medicine they deserve.

Read More:‘I, Tonya’ Review: Margot Robbie Sticks the Landing in this Sympathetically Bitter Tonya Harding Biopic

In the process, it also consolidates Stiller’s recurring motifs into a deeper, more melancholic version. Trapped in his
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Love Means Zero’ Review: An Entertaining Doc About the Tennis World’s Greatest Monster

  • Indiewire
‘Love Means Zero’ Review: An Entertaining Doc About the Tennis World’s Greatest Monster
Remember Anwar Congo, the aging mass-murderer profiled in Joshua Oppenheimer’s “The Act of Killing?” Well, imagine if that guy had been born in the United States instead of Indonesia, and had become a children’s tennis coach instead of the genocidal leader of a North Sumatran death squad, and you’ll have a pretty good idea of who Nick Bollettieri is and what he’s all about.

Of course, that’s not at all to suggest that these men are equally evil — one slaughtered untold numbers of innocent people, the other just ruined Andre Agassi’s chances of winning the 1989 French Open — but rather to say that both of them personify the same type of narcissistic madness. It’s not a rare condition; we all know people like them: people who dehumanize the rest of us as a defense mechanism. People who pretend that the past can’t hurt them.
See full article at Indiewire »

We chat to The Graduate Producer Lawrence Turman to celebrate 50 years of the awesome classic

Author: Adam Lowes

Here’s to you, Mrs. Robinson! The classic coming-of-age yarn The Graduate is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. To mark this very special occasion we spoke with the film’s producer, Lawrence Turman.

Having reached something of a landmark age himself last year in turning 90, Mr. Turman has had a long and illustrious career in Hollywood, with an array of iconic films under his belt as producer, including The Thing, American History X and Short Circuit. Taking time out from his schedule (still working, he teaches film classes at the University of Southern California) Mr. Turman chatted with us about the enduring legacy of the film.

HeyUGuys: Congratulations on this milestone. Firstly, what do you think it is about the film which has awarded it this longevity?

Lawrence Truman: I chuckle because if I knew, I’d have constantly repeated it.

How did the project materialise?
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘The Goldbergs’ Are Doing ‘Weird Science’ in the Season 5 Premiere [TCA 2017]

‘The Goldbergs’ Are Doing ‘Weird Science’ in the Season 5 Premiere [TCA 2017]
The movie-themed episodes of The Goldbergs have been fan favorites, and favorites of creator Adam F. Goldberg. Movies like The Karate Kid, Dirty Dancing, Short Circuit and Batman have provided the basis for several episodes of the family sitcom. On a Television Critics Association set visit to the Sony Studios lot, Goldbergs star Wendi McLendon-Covey told reporters that […]

The post ‘The Goldbergs’ Are Doing ‘Weird Science’ in the Season 5 Premiere [TCA 2017] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Autobot Prowl joins Transformers: Forged to Fight

Kabam Games and Hasbro have announced the latest addition to the roster of Transformers: Forged to Fight as Autobot Prowl joins the battle.

He may look like your friendly neighborhood cop on patrol, but check under the hood and he’s 100% military-trained police on a mission to serve and protect. Autobot Prowl is a trusted strategist and friend of Optimus Prime, but he’s decidedly less friendly to those who don’t follow protocol…his protocol.

Here’s Prowl’s abilities:

Signature Ability – Good Cop:

After charging his Melee Buffs, Prowl gets a surge of Power based on how many Melee Buffs he activated.

Passive:

After charging his Melee Buffs, Prowl gets 1.5 ~ 4% Power for each Melee Buff activated.

Special Attacks:

Special 1 – Short Circuit

His short fuse and their short circuit.

100% chance to Power Burn, consuming up to 23.8 ~ 36.4% of the target’s max Power. If the opponent reaches zero Power
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

John Badham interview: Saturday Night Fever at 40

Don Kaye May 15, 2017

Director John Badman looks back at his disco classic four decades later...

Saturday Night Fever is the film that made John Travolta into a legitimate star, launched the Bee Gees to the pinnacle of pop success and introduced the world to the subculture, music and fashion of disco dancing - specifically the scene in the clubs of the insular blue collar Brooklyn neighbourhood of Bay Ridge. The movie made the scene and music into a national phenomenon that lasted several years, until the disco craze petered out in the early '80s.

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The whole thing was based on a New York magazine article called 'Tribal Rites Of The New Saturday Night', written by a British journalist named
See full article at Den of Geek »

After the Hollywood Romances, Sex and Dugs — What Happened to the Brat Pack?

With a multi-generational reunion of sorts between Brat Pack alum Molly Ringwald and Andrew McCarthy’s son in the works, we’re taking the opportunity to catch up with all of the former ’80s teen phenoms — and their offspring — over 30 years after they first earned their iconic nickname.

During a recent appearance on The Moms, McCarthy revealed that his 15-year-old son, Sam, will appear in an upcoming movie called All These Small Moments alongside the famous red-head.

“She emailed me on the first day and she said, ‘Your son just did a scene and when he walked away, it was
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Means of Film Production: The Documentary Cinema of Manfred Kirchheimer

  • MUBI
The American Skyscraper and Louis Sullivan. Courtesy of the filmmaker.It’s rare to come across such a humble yet cogent body of work as that of Manfred Kirchheimer. His career stretches across six decades but it would be a mistake to reduce his films to mere historical records, for they can enclose enthralling stories of ordinary New Yorkers or celebrate the beauty of urban structures all while confronting head-on layered questions on class, race and identity. Throughout the years, his subjects have fluctuated from workers pushing carts through New York’s Garment District, the docking of a transatlantic ocean liner or a community of Jewish émigrés in the Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights. As modest as his filmography might seem, one shouldn’t oversee its substantial contribution to American documentary and independent cinema.During a recent conversation, Kirchheimer told me he had recently retired as a teacher at the
See full article at MUBI »
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