Former FBI profiler Will Graham returns to service to pursue a deranged serial killer dubbed "the Tooth Fairy" by the media.

Director:

Michael Mann

Writers:

Thomas Harris (based on the book "Red Dragon" by), Michael Mann (screenplay by)
Reviews
Popularity
1,613 ( 158)
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
William Petersen ... Will Graham
Kim Greist ... Molly Graham
Joan Allen ... Reba McClane
Brian Cox ... Dr. Hannibal Lecktor
Dennis Farina ... Jack Crawford
Tom Noonan ... Francis Dollarhyde
Stephen Lang ... Freddy Lounds
David Seaman David Seaman ... Kevin Graham
Benjamin Hendrickson ... Dr. Frederick Chilton
Michael Talbott ... Geehan
Dan Butler ... Jimmy Price (as Dan E. Butler)
Michele Shay Michele Shay ... Beverly Katz
Robin Moseley Robin Moseley ... Sarah
Paul Perri Paul Perri ... Dr. Sidney Bloom
Patricia Charbonneau ... Mrs. Sherman
Edit

Storyline

Will Graham (William Petersen) is a former F.B.I. Agent who recently retired to Florida with his wife Molly (Kim Greist) and their young son, Kevin (David Seaman). Graham was a "profiler", one who profiles criminal's behavior and tries to put his mind into the minds of criminals to examine their thoughts while visiting crime scenes. Will is called out of his self-imposed retirement at the request of his former boss Jack Crawford (Dennis Farina) to help the F.B.I. catch an elusive serial killer, known to the press as the "Tooth Fairy" (Tom Noonan), who randomly kills whole families in their houses during nights of the full moon and leaves bite marks on his victims. To try to search for clues to get into the mind of the killer, Will has occasional meetings with Dr. Hannibal Lecktor (Brian Cox), a charismatic, but very dangerous imprisoned serial killer that Will captured years earlier which nearly drove him insane from the horrific encounter that nearly cost Will's life. With some help ... Written by matt-282

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Will Graham Has The Mind Of A Psychopath - Thank God He's On The Right Side Of The Law See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

A native of Evanston, Illinois, a city just north of Chicago, William Petersen (Will Graham) is so devoted to his hometown sports teams, that he left the set in Georgia one day and flew to Washington, D.C. for a few hours to watch a Chicago Bears game on television. See more »

Goofs

As Graham walks through the woods toward the house in the final scene, the dolly tracks for the camera are visible on the ground. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Jack Crawford: We should have talked at the boatyard. You don't wanna talk about it here.
Will Graham: I'm not fallin' all over myself to talk about much anywhere, Jack.
See more »

Alternate Versions

In 1991, to hype up the release of Silence of the Lambs, a heavily-edited version of Manhunter was shown on NBC. It was re titled to it's book: "Red Dragon" with an added tag line: "The Curse of Hannibal Lector." The neon green "Manhunter" at the beginning was changed to a red "Red Dragon" with the same font. It was cut down to fit into a 2 hour time slot with commercials and was edited for swearing and nudity/sex. However despite the extensive cuts, it featured several deleted shots and scenes from the director's cut, including the original ending where Graham visits the family who would have been Dollarhyde's next victims. This version only aired on TV and never saw a home video release. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Cinemassacre's Monster Madness: Silence of the Lambs (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

COELOCANTH
Performed by Shriekback
Courtesy of ARISTA RECORDS LIMITED and ISLAND RECORDS, INC.
Written by David Allen, Martyn Barker, Barry Andrews and Carl Marsh
Published by POINT MUSIC, LTD.
See more »

User Reviews

 
What? No Tattoos?!
14 October 2002 | by billymac72See all my reviews

I'm starting to think that I may be one of the only people who saw this film when it was originally theatrically released! Years after that, as a freshman in college, I was managing a video store when a woman came in looking for the recently released `Silence of the Lambs.' She said she knew William Petersen from childhood and told me that he was in THE first Hannibal the Cannibal movie. Having not read the novel or seen the movie for a while, I never related the two before that. But I specifically remembered `Manhunter' for its creepy killer, spectacular use of Iron Butterfly, and the strange & frightening notion (for then) of FBI profiling. These three details alone speak volumes for the film's acting, style and writing. The irony of forcing oneself to share the same maniacal thoughts as a killer in order to catch them is the stuff of nightmares. Since reconnecting with `Manhunter' back then, I've remained a constant fan of the film.

But the film suffers today in several ways. First off, any comparison to `Silence of the Lambs' is going to come up short. `Silence' is simply a better film – a classic of the highest caliber that will continue to sustain itself with the passage of time. Those already acquainted with Jonathan Demme's world will probably have a hard time accepting `Manhunter.' But audiences should judge the film on its own merits, and recognize that unlike `Red Dragon' it was not designed to resemble an established world of a classic movie – which is both a curse and an advantage for both films. I recently saw `Red Dragon,' by the way, and loved it. Walking out, I found myself asking whether I liked it better than `Manhunter.' These comparisons can get very silly because not only am I basing my impressions on a book, but also a previously filmed version and a closely related `sequel.' Best method: let each stand alone, THEN decide if either was successful. Both films succeed for similar and different reasons.

The approach of `Manhunter' is much more cold and observational than `Red Dragon.' This style (often concerned with widely symmetrical composition), like Kubrick's, can greatly benefit the story if used properly. I really liked it here. The neatness and sterility of the 80s décor also works perfectly in this format, providing a nice contrast to the horrors sometimes contained within its walls.

As for the music, it has not aged well. The synthesized stuff in the first hour is effective at times (especially when it's just a single, sustained note a la John Carpenter, or those bits that sound like `Blade Runner'), and the inclusion of In-a-Gadda-da-Vida is inspired, but the electronic balladry during Dolarhyde's romance is simply awful and detract from the scenes. Obviously, the danger of using such modern music is that it can become outdated and cheesy very quick. Is it just me, or does this especially seem true of 80s music? Given Michael Mann's career, he clearly wouldn't agree. I guess one never knows. The Tangerine Dream score for `Risky Business' or Phillip Glass' for `Thin Blue Line,' for example, still hold up remarkably well from this period.

The performances, however, are still wonderful. Petersen (whom I've heard didn't like the job he did) reaches just the right blend of seeming haunted, detached, morose, and as Dolarhyde describes him, purposeful. Dennis Farina, himself a former Chicago cop, exudes realistic authority as Jack Crawford. Tom Noonan obtains a disturbing childlike innocence and deliberation in his terror. And Brian Cox…poor guy, will always be compared to Anthony Hopkins. It's unfair because he gives us a Lecter that is different, to be sure, but intelligent in a way that, to me, is more realistic, intriguing and ultimately frightening. Hopkins' Hannibal is so supremely horrible that he's practically supernatural at this point, not unlike Dracula or the Wolfman. I enjoy all of that too, but just on a different level.

8/10


139 of 169 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 524 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 August 1986 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Red Dragon: The Curse of Hannibal Lecter See more »

Filming Locations:

Florida, USA See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$15,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,204,400, 17 August 1986

Gross USA:

$8,620,929

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$8,620,929
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut) | (video)

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby Stereo (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed