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Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama | 14 March 1986 (USA)
Trailer
0:31 | Trailer
Between two Thanksgivings two years apart, Hannah's husband falls in love with her sister Lee, while her hypochondriac ex-husband rekindles his relationship with her sister Holly.

Director:

Woody Allen

Writer:

Woody Allen
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Popularity
1,800 ( 2,841)
Won 3 Oscars. Another 24 wins & 26 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Barbara Hershey ... Lee
Carrie Fisher ... April
Michael Caine ... Elliot
Mia Farrow ... Hannah
Dianne Wiest ... Holly
Maureen O'Sullivan ... Norma
Lloyd Nolan ... Evan
Max von Sydow ... Frederick (as Max Von Sydow)
Woody Allen ... Mickey
Lewis Black ... Paul
Julia Louis-Dreyfus ... Mary
Christian Clemenson ... Larry
Julie Kavner ... Gail
J.T. Walsh ... Ed Smythe
John Turturro ... Writer
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Storyline

Hannah, Holly, and Lee are adult sisters from a show business family, their boozy actress mother who still believes she's an ingénue that can attract any man she wants, despite still being married to the girls' father, Evan. Hannah, on her second marriage to a man named Elliot, a financial advisor, is the success of the family, taking a break from her acting career to raise her children. Everyone turns to her for advice, while she never talks to others about what she needs or feels. Her first husband, Mickey, is a comedy show writer and hypochondriac, who is going through a crisis as he mistakenly believes he will die soon without a clear belief, as a non-practicing Jew, of what will happen to him in the afterlife. Single Holly is the insecure flaky sister, a struggling and thus continually unemployed actress, who has just started a catering business with her actress friend April, in order to do something constructive with her life. In her own security, Hannah even set up Holly and ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Brooke Shields was considered for the role of April. She turned it down because she was attending Princeton. See more »

Goofs

At the Thanksgiving table, Dianne Wiest accidentally hits her wine glass and spills some wine on the table. She and Barbara Hershey continue to have a laugh over this as Lloyd Nolan gives his speech. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Elliot: God, she's beautiful. She's got the prettiest eyes. She looks so sexy in that sweater. I just want to be alone with her and hold her and kiss her and tell her how much I love her and take care of her. Stop it you idiot, she's your wife's sister. But I can't help it. I'm consumed by her. It's been months now. I dream about her, I - I - I think about her at the office. Oh Lee, what am I gonna do? I hear myself moaning over you and it's disgusting. Before, when she squeezed past me at...
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Connections

Referenced in Alpha House: Hippo Issues (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

I've Heard That Song Before
by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne
Performed by Harry James
Courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
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User Reviews

Woody's more mature rumination on Manhattan life & love with an impeccable ensemble cast
4 September 2002 | by JawsOfJoshSee all my reviews

While I am a Woody Allen fanatic, I'm not sure if I agree with the minority of Woody fans who claim this is his best film, instead of "Annie Hall". Sure, I would be quick to elect "Annie" as Woody's best, but then I regard "Manhattan", "Stardust Memories", "Crimes & Misdemeanors", as well as "Hannah And Her Sisters", and I become unsure. This is certainly one of Woody's most mature films, and I would freely place it in my top five of Woody's works. It nicely balances comedy with drama, and it also began a new era of high accomplishment for Woody. Functioning as an ensemble drama loosely organized around three sisters, "Hannah" chronicles several stories at once. The film has an incredibly warm, intimate feeling about it, as people talk in their earth-toned apartments over J.S. Bach or stroll through the city's crisp autumn air. What rings most true about this film is that it doesn't end quite the way you thought it would (the words "too tidy" and "unpunished" get unfairly used a lot), yet it ends as it should.

Ironically, Hannah (played by Mia Farrow) doesn't fare too deeply in the film. The eldest of three, she's the family matriarch soothing her aging parents, a showbiz couple reluctantly settling into old age and blaming each other for it. Her husband Elliot (Michael Caine expertly stuttering & flushing) is consumed with guilt over his heavy crush on Hannah's sensuous, down-to-earth sister, Lee. Lee is slowly pulling away from her failing relationship with Frederick (the always excellent Max Von Sydow), a horribly misanthropic curmudgeon whose reliance on her as his last link to humanity becomes suffocating. The youngest sister, Holly (Dianne Wiest - kicking ass as usual), is a nervous, impatient actress whose insecurity and lack of success lead to competing with her best friend April over work and men. Meanwhile, Hannah's ex-husband Mickey (Woody), a severe hypochondriac, is trying desperately to accept his eventual mortality and still find some meaning in life, which it what it seems all the other characters are trying to do. I won't say where the stories are going or where they all end up, but I will say the ensemble cast is all-around great, Michael Caine and Dianne Wiest are definitely the stand-outs here (their Oscars were well-deserved), but Max Von Sydow and Barbara Hershey do quite fine as well. As for Woody - Mickey is the kind of character that fans were probably waiting for him to play for years, and he pulls it off with his classic ticks & twitches.

Woody's evident genius is shown here by juggling the separate stories back & forth so fluidly. Most attention seems to be focused on Elliot and Lee during the first half (both conflicted & confused), while the second half slightly centers around Mickey and Holly (both nervous & unsure). Mickey operates mostly as an outsider and the strength of his story doesn't pertain too much to "the sisters" (although there are two hysterical flashbacks sequences, one involving Hannah and the other detailing a disastrous date with Holly). Another masterstroke on Woody's part are the internal voice-overs. Woody is too smart to know that there are certain thoughts a person has that will exist only in their head, and extracting these feelings into some kind of dialogue with another person would seem forced. It's casual pacing, novelistic endeavors, vivid characters, cozy settings, heartfelt music and sharp, candid dialogue are what makes this film hold up beautifully for me after dozens of viewings. It's an absolute Woody Allen film.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 March 1986 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Hannah and Her Sisters See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,400,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,265,826, 9 February 1986

Gross USA:

$40,084,041

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$40,084,041
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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