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Revisiting Hours: Won’t You Be My Neighbor — ‘The People Under the Stairs’

Every Friday, we’re recommending an older movie available to stream or download and worth seeing again through the lens of our current moment. We’re calling the series “Revisiting Hours” — consider this Rolling Stone’s unofficial film club. This week: Alex Pappademas on Wes Craven’s The People Under the Stairs.

In real life, the house where most of Wes Craven’s The People Under the Stairs takes place is a three-story Craftsman-style mansion in the West Adams district of Los Angeles. When the neighborhood’s well-to-do white population
See full article at Rolling Stone »

David Lynch Releases Long-Awaited Thought Gang Album/Music Video As A Reports Of A New Film Surface

Thought Gang is a band that was created back in the early ‘90s when filmmaker David Lynch and his “Blue Velvet”/”Twin Peaks” composer Angelo Badalamenti decided to work together on a new musical venture. They worked with a variety of musicians and attempted to create something special. Lynch even filmed a music video for one of the tracks, “A Real Indication.” And now, 26 years after the album was recorded, Lynch has finally released the Thought Gang album and the video he directed.

Continue reading David Lynch Releases Long-Awaited Thought Gang Album/Music Video As A Reports Of A New Film Surface at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

David Lynch on his band: 'Sound like headless chickens on speed!'

The film-maker laughed so hard at the singer’s voice, he gave himself a hernia. David Lynch relives his days in Thought Gang, the band whose music was even wilder than his movies

‘It was a grand experiment,” says David Lynch. “But I really don’t know who will appreciate it.” The director is talking about Thought Gang, an esoteric jazz group he put together in the early 1990s, with composer Angelo Badalamenti. Their album is only now being released.

The pair first worked together when Badalamenti scored 1986’s Blue Velvet, but by 1990 their relationship had fully crystallised – and the songs they wrote for Twin Peaks were as engulfing as the fog that swirled through the town in the cult TV show.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Q&A: The Special’s Mark Steensland and James Newman on the Release of Their New Literary Collaboration

  • DailyDead
Easily one of the wildest and darkly funny stories I’ve read throughout all of 2018 is The Special, from co-writers James Newman and Mark Steensland. A cautionary tale about “too much of a good thing” that morphs into an oozing and cringe-worthy story of body horror, The Special is not only celebrating its recent release, but the story has also been nabbed by filmmaker Harrison Smith for his next feature to boot.

I recently had the opportunity to catch up with both Steensland and Newman, asked them about coming up with the story of The Special, some of their influences and their experiences working together, and what’s next for them as well. And for those of you who are into genre-bending stories that beautifully blend humor and horror, you can purchase The Special on Amazon Here.

Can you guys talk about the genesis of your creative relationship and coming
See full article at DailyDead »

Summer of 84 Review – Grimmfest 2018

  • HeyUGuys
Sometimes it feels as if eighties-styled genre tributes are becoming as prolific a cinema exercise as superhero films. Even the wildly successful It remake swapped out the novel’s sixties setting for that era of BMX-straddling and Pac-Man-binging. Summer of 84 – a coming-of-age thriller whose very name conjures up the type of obvious nostalgia fest we’ve come accustomed to of late – is able to subvert expectations due to the care and attention the makers have taken to ensure it isn’t just another predictable pastiche. The film’s only real sticking point is the weak denouement which can’t match the dark thrills and foreboding atmosphere with preludes it.

Davey Armstrong (Graham Verchere) is an Oregon teenager passing the time during the long hot summer holidays delivering newspapers and hanging with his close-knit circle of friends. His parents are concerned that Davey doesn’t end up on the side of a milk carton,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

A Star is Reborn: Roy Orbison Reemerges With a Surprise Tribute in Bradley Cooper’s Hit Musical

  • Variety
A Star is Reborn: Roy Orbison Reemerges With a Surprise Tribute in Bradley Cooper’s Hit Musical
One of the emotional climaxes of the new “A Star is Born” remake arrives when Bradley Cooper, playing alcoholic country-rocker Jackson Maine, drunkenly humiliates his wife, a mortified Lady Gaga, at the Grammy Awards. But just before he makes a mockery of himself at the podium, Maine stumbles through a tribute segment to the late Roy Orbison. Hammered to the point of being barely conscious, he nevertheless makes it through some rowdy guitar licks on a rousing cover of Orbison’s famous “Oh, Pretty Woman,” while the real-life Brandi Carlile takes the vocal lead.

It’s an exciting, memorable scene. And it happens to come right as Orbison is already having a moment.

It’s been 31 years since T Bone Burnett assembled Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waits, Elvis Costello and others for the super-group tribute show “A Black and White Night” — a concert special Cooper’s scene knowingly references. Months after
See full article at Variety »

Podtalk: Kyle MacLachlan at Michigan Avenue Magazine 10th Celebration

Chicago – At Chicago’s Michigan Avenue Magazine 10th Anniversary Issue event on September 11th, 2018, a surprise visitor joined cover celebrity Darren Criss, and his low-key appearance brought a stir of excitement to the room. Actor Kyle MacLachlan, best known for the extraordinary work in “Twin Peaks,” was in the house.

MacLachlan of course was Agent Dale Cooper, in the original run of “Twin Peaks” in 1990-91, the movie prequel “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me” and the unforgettable 18 episode revisit to Tp by director/creator David Lynch, that played on the Showtime Network in 2017. But that’s not all for the Amazing Mr. MacLachlan. He is a prodigy of David Lynch, having made his debut in the director’s film version of “Dune” in 1984, followed by his godly turn in “Blue Velvet” (1986). He is also memorable in so many other roles, including Ray Manzarek in Oliver Stone’s “The Doors
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Kyle MacLachlan Shares the First Pep Talk David Lynch Gave Him, Relives Horrific First Reaction to ‘Showgirls’

Kyle MacLachlan Shares the First Pep Talk David Lynch Gave Him, Relives Horrific First Reaction to ‘Showgirls’
Kyle MacLachlan was only 23 years old when he made his acting debut in David Lynch’s “Dune,” a major gig for even the most experienced actor. The movie was the start of the actor’s longtime friendship with the director, and MacLachlan knew pretty early on Lynch was going to be a trusted collaborator. MacLachlan recently joined GQ for a video interview looking back on his career and revealed an early memory of Lynch that sealed the deal on their friendship.

“The first screen test I did I had never seen a film camera before. I was looking down the barrel of the camera and I went completely blank,” MacLachlan said. “David came over to me. I told him, ‘I don’t think I can do this, David,’ and he said to me, ‘You’re gonna be great, it’s gonna be great, you’re gonna be fine. I know you can do it.
See full article at Indiewire »

15 Artists Who Went Years Between Hits

15 Artists Who Went Years Between Hits
“Some years I’m the coolest thing that ever happened, and then the next year everyone’s so over me,” Cher told Rolling Stone in 1999. She had just released “Believe,” which set the record for longest gap between Number Ones on Billboard’s Hot 100, a milestone that stands to this day. She joins many other big names — from the Beach Boys to Aretha Franklin and Meat Loaf — on our list of artists who mixed up a cocktail of fortitude, talent and luck to fight their way back onto the charts
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Horror Highlights: The Outer Wild Trailer and Poster, Drunken Devil’s “Bacchanalia” Celebration, The Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies’ “The Mastery of the Outsider” Class

  • DailyDead
In today's Horror Highlights, we have the trailer and poster for Philip Chidel's post-apocalyptic thriller The Outer Wild. We also have details on Drunken Devil's Halloween extravaganza Bacchanalia, and details on Stealing Fire: The Mastery of the Outsider, a new class featuring a conversation between artist Joe Coleman and writer/producer Heather Buckley as part of The Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies in New York City.

Check Out a Trailer and Poster for The Outer Wild: "The Outer Wild was written and directed by Philip Chidel (Subject Two), and stars Lauren McKnight (So Undercover), Christian Oliver (House Of Good And Evil), Jeffrey Vincent Parise (CW's "Supernatural"), Tory Taranova (Everybody Wants Some!!), Jimmy Jean-Louis (NBC's "Heroes"), and Zach Roerig (CW's "The Vampire Diaries").

The Outer Wild is a genre-bending thriller, part post-apocalyptic western and part Sci-Fi/horror/thriller, a generation after the unnatural event that has destroyed mankind.
See full article at DailyDead »

Frightfest 2018: ‘Summer of 84′ Review

Stars: Graham Verchere, Judah Lewis, Caleb Emery, Cory Gruter-Andrew, Tiera Skovbye, Rich Sommer, Jason Gray-Stanford, Shauna Johannesen | Written by Matt Leslie, Stephen J. Smith | Directed by Francois Simard, Anouk Whissell, Yoann-Karl Whissell

The Turbo Kid directing trio (known collectively as Rkss) return with this ’80s teen adventure homage that taps into the same nostalgic vein as Stranger Things or the recent remake of Stephen King’s It. Affectionately made and superbly acted, it’s shot through with a streak of darkness that delivers genuine chills.

Summer of 84‘s hero is fifteen year old Davey (Graham Verchere), a conspiracy theory obsessive who’s dividing the summer between his paper round and hanging out with his three best friends: chubby, sensitive Woody (Caleb Emery), brainy nerd Faraday (Cory Gruter-Andrew) and would-be tough guy Eats (Judah Lewis). When a serial killer anonymously announces that he’s responsible for over a dozen deaths of young boys in the area,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘Shirkers’ Is A Love Letter To Renegade Filmmaking And The Ghosts Of The Past [North Bend Film Fest Review]

Making a film is incredibly difficult. For most, it’s a labor of love and not a financially viable endeavor, which is exactly what “Shirkers” was to Sandi Tan. Growing up in Singapore and loving things that were seen as taboo, she wrote her own avant-garde screenplay at age nineteen about a serial killer named “S,” who she would play.

Continue reading ‘Shirkers’ Is A Love Letter To Renegade Filmmaking And The Ghosts Of The Past [North Bend Film Fest Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Summer of 84 Review: Feel Good Nostalgia Meets Brutal Horror

Summer of 84 Review: Feel Good Nostalgia Meets Brutal Horror
A comparison to Stranger Things simply can't be avoided. Whether by design or by shared intuition, Summer of 84 taps into that same surging wave of 1980s-era nostalgia that propelled Netflix's megahit horror/sci-fi series into the forefront of popular consciousness. They share pages from the same playbook: Steven Spielberg allusions, Easter Eggs aplenty, a throbbing retro synth soundtrack, a commitment to historical accuracy, and references that only those of us who actually lived through the 1980s will recognize. But Stanger Things didn't invent theses tropes; series masterminds Matt and Ross Duffer simply excelled at pushing all the right buttons in an undeniably pleasing combination.

And now horror-centric and mainstream entertainment-seekers alike are hooked on that syrupy sweet concoction, illustrated by the success of 2017's It, which was updated to take place in the 1980s. Now, a recognizable trend has studios seeing dollar signs, and Summer of 84 will
See full article at MovieWeb »

What’s Next for Jordan Peele and His House of Horrors

  • Variety
What’s Next for Jordan Peele and His House of Horrors
Atop the coffee table inside the house where Jordan Peele’s Monkeypaw Prods. lives sit some very on-brand periodicals — titles like Heavy Metal, Fangoria and Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone Magazine. The Twilight Zone issue is a gem. It not only boasts a photo-realistic illustration of a human baby with a cat head but also a David Lynch retrospective covering his career “From ‘Dune’ to ‘Blue Velvet’” and a special report that takes readers “Inside the New Horror.” The magazine is dated 1988. Its owner was 9 years old when it was published.

Thirty years later, it’s a pretty good emblem for what he’s up to.

The Monkeypaw house is an unorthodox place for a production company. First of all, it’s, yes, a house — balanced precariously on a Hollywood hillside, tucked into a residential neighborhood. Peele sits on the balcony of the upper floor, under the Hollywood Sign, a
See full article at Variety »

London: The Top Cultural Events of the Week Under £40

While the city swelters, it’s easy to push your goals and what you might need to do to achieve them to the back of your mind, but this week we’re embracing our best sweaty selves and getting inspired by the arts and the culture that drew us here in the first place! Soak up a cinematic summer.It isn’t really summer in London until you’ve sat in the open air courtyard of the iconic Somerset House either listening to music or watching a film. Film4 Summer Screen season begins this week and it’s a corker. Cult hits like Blue Velvet and stone-cold cinematic classics like Bride of Frankenstein all feature, so get down there and soak it in. (£19) Get Promming.Another London Summer institution is the Henry Wood Promenade Concert Series commonly known as Proms. Held at the beautiful Royal Albert Hall, the Proms are
See full article at Backstage »

Harry Dean Stanton’s Final Film ‘Lucky’ Finally Gets A UK Release Date

We’ve been championing it on the site for months, and now we can reveal that Harry Dean Stanton’s poignant final film Lucky has a UK release date.

Lucky follows the spiritual journey of Harry Dean Stanton’s character ‘Lucky’, a cantankerous, self-reliant 90 year old atheist, and the quirky characters that inhabit the Arizona town where he lives. Having out-lived and out-smoked all of his contemporaries, the fiercely independent Lucky finds himself at the precipice of life, thrust into a journey of self-exploration, leading towards that which is so often unattainable: enlightenment.

The cast also features director David Lynch (Twin Peaks, Mulholland Drive, Blue Velvet), Ron Livingston (The Conjuring, Swingers, Office Space), Ed Begley Jr.(St. Elsewhere), and Tom Skerritt (Alien, Top Gun, Contact).

Our review of the film from the London Film Festival last year read:

John Carroll Lynch’s film may plod for some, but make no mistake,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Is David Lynch Making a New Film with Netflix?

It was exactly one year ago when we were still reeling from the experience that was episodes one through eight of David Lynch’s return to Twin Peaks, given a two-week July 4th break after the lattermost “Gotta Light?” episode aired, itself one of the greatest hours of television I’ve ever witnessed. Over the next ten weeks, we would savor the rest of what the director concocted, and in the year that has passed there’s been talk here and there that Lynch and crew weren’t completely closing the door on Dale Cooper and Laura Palmer’s story. However, having been extremely content in terms of where The Return ended, I was hoping the ecstatic response to Lynch’s masterwork resulted in more opportunities for the director to find feature film financing.

It looks like that may be the case.

On the heels of releasing his excellent new memoir Room to Dream,
See full article at The Film Stage »

David Lynch: The Conservative Heart of a Radical (Column)

  • Variety
David Lynch: The Conservative Heart of a Radical (Column)
If David Lynch learned one thing from the uproar that greeted his original comments about Donald Trump (“Could go down as one of the greatest presidents in history because he has disrupted the thing so much”), which were made during an interview with the British newspaper the Guardian, it is this: In the internet age, what you say can and will be used against you. I have no doubt that whatever the public outcry against Lynch’s words, you could multiply it by a million — I mean it, a million — to register the gale force with which he was hit by it personally. That’s the way social media works, especially when you’re famous. For him, it must have been like standing in a hurricane.

The reason for the outcry, of course, is that David Lynch, in the eyes of so many of us, stands for values — he’s an artist,
See full article at Variety »

David Lynch Responds to Backlash and Tells Trump: ‘You Are Causing Suffering and Division’

  • Variety
David Lynch Responds to Backlash and Tells Trump: ‘You Are Causing Suffering and Division’
David Lynch has responded to his earlier comments in an interview with the Guardian in which he said “Trump could go down as one of the greatest presidents in history.” Donald Trump had tweeted a link to a Breitbart write-up of Lynch’s remarks, and praised them at a Monday night rally.

Lynch wrote that the quote was “taken a bit out of context and would need some explaining.” The lengthy, wide-ranging interview, coinciding with the publication of his new bio-memoir “Room to Dream,” touched on numerous subjects from fatherhood to not making any more feature films. But it was his remarks on Trump that drew widespread bewilderment from Lynch fans, who had equated his status as a counter-culture icon with someone whose politics would be progressive.

Lynch posted the following on his Facebook page Tuesday:

Dear Mr. President,

This is David Lynch writing. I saw that you re-tweeted the
See full article at Variety »

David Lynch Is Not a Trump Supporter, But He’s Never Been a Democrat, So Deal With It — Analysis

David Lynch Is Not a Trump Supporter, But He’s Never Been a Democrat, So Deal With It — Analysis
David Lynch is a brilliant artist who has never been great with words. He dances around any pressure to interpret his work, and typically reverts to odd, nonspecific pronouncements about the nature of the world and his vocation in a cheery, unassuming tone that often seems at odds with his dark, enigmatic storytelling. Lynch’s art — his movies, music, and especially his painting — speaks with far more clarity than anything he has ever said in public, and adheres to its own internal reasoning. His best movies are a mishmash of Americana and its nightmarish abstractions, impermeable dreams given cogent form.

All of that means the hysteria around his supposed positive claims about Donald Trump says less about Lynch’s political philosophy than the absence of one. Lynch fans declared the headlines clickbait, but they’re verbatim: “He could go down as one of the greatest presidents in history because he
See full article at Indiewire »
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