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5/10
80s B-movie
SnoopyStyle11 April 2015
Quint (Tommy Lee Jones) is an unflappable thief who is hired by the FBI agent Johnson (Bubba Smith) to steal data from the Lucky Dollar Corporation. Company goon Marvin Ringer (Lee Ving) recognizes him as he escapes. He hides the tape in an experimental car during a gas station stopover. Nina (Linda Hamilton) leads a car theft ring and steals the prototype Black Moon. It's a high tech operation inside a highrise fortress run by Ed Ryland (Robert Vaughn).

At least the car chases are real but it doesn't make them exciting. There are lots of things that seems cheesy watching it this many years later. The chop shop operation is unreal. It's like some sort of Bond villain hideout. Part of me wondered if the elevator would open up to a shark tank when killing that guy. The car is also cheesy and doesn't hold up. There is the setup where the FBI has hired a thief to steal evidence. How is that ever legal? It would easily be discovered and rule inadmissible in court. The script from John Carpenter is not well thought out. This is a B-movie cobbling together Knight Rider, some interesting actors, a heist and a couple of car chases. It's better made than most other B-movies. In a minor note, they are steering way too much in that car. It looks out of control. On the other hand, it can claim jumping a car from one highrise to another.
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2/10
"With black moon in the sky as you're rolling your eye, that's a bad film."
mark.waltz9 March 2021
Warning: Spoilers
Sung to the music of "That's Amore", I couldn't think of a better way to describe this head shaking action picture. Fortunately there's a dependable leading man (Tommy Lee Jones), some great veteran character actors and some intense car chases, as well as a very funny opening where Jones prevents the robbery of a convenience store by being flip with the teenage thief.

But for bland leading lady Linda Hamilton, unfortunately no kind words, just laughs when she steals a high tech, high speed car that gravity forces into a ridiculous looking drivers posture as she speeds down Vegas streets.

You're not even on the main drag here, just the downtown area of skyscrapers and parking garages where cars like this are being stolen for some ridiculous reason so her bad boss, Robert Vaughan, can re-sell them. What's Jones want with it? A video he's hidden inside, also stolen, needed for a corporate takeover. Some intense action, nail biting at times, does make this a bit more tolerable, and some moments are enough to make you cry out as they provide some real shocks.

Under the direction of John Carpenter, this is a throwback to some of his early B films, and that would be okay if it wasn't so pretentious and convoluted. By thinking that it's too smart for its audiences, it damages the impact. 80's action and sci-fi audiences wanted thrills, but they wanted a story that you could follow without having to question everything later on. Once a movie is over, it's over, and with something like this, you don't want to waste your time discussing what was going on for hours afterwards. No rising here, just a limp flat tire.
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7/10
A relic
kosmasp24 March 2020
No I'm not talking about Tommy Lee Jones or Linda Hamilton, both quite well known. No I mean the movie itself. It can be seen as a testament or rather as an example of how movies were in the 80s. Not all of them and not all boxes are ticked, but more than enough to get the picture (no pun intended).

The intro/beginning, that introduces us to Jones character is quite something. Really cool and almost a shame that character and his dryness was not explored in more movies. I could have seen him as dirtier ... Harry, you know from the other side of the law kind of. This is quite flawed and I can see why people rated it so low - but it can also be a lot of fun, with no real substance to it. Your choice
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8/10
A fun 80's action thriller
Woodyanders24 January 2008
Warning: Spoilers
Master thief Sam Quint (Tommy Lee Jones in peak rough'n'tumble craggy form) is hired by the government to steal data from a shady organization. Quint hides the data in an experimental supercar called the Black Moon. The Black Moon gets ripped off by sassy ace automobile booster Nina (a winning performance by the insanely foxy Linda Hamilton), who works for a stolen car ring run by the ruthless Ed Ryland (a nicely slimy Robert Vaughn). Quint has to break into Ryland's impregnable office building so he can steal back the Black Moon. Director Harvey Cokeless maintains a constant brisk pace and stages the action scenes with real rip-snorting brio. Lalo Schifrin's robust, rousing, jazzy score pumps up the tension. Misha Suslov's slick cinematography gives the film an attractive polished look. The bang-up supporting cast rates as another major plus: Richard Jaeckel as nerdy scientist Earl Windom, Bubba Smith as intimidating government agent Johnson, Lee Ving as vicious thug Marvin Ringer, Dan Shor as Windom's amiable assistant Billy Lyons, William Sanderson as sweet deaf guy Tyke Thayden, and Keenan Wynn as the ailing Iron John. Jones makes for a refreshingly human and vulnerable protagonist. The climactic break-in sequence is especially tense and gripping. Moreover, there's an amusingly sly sense of humor evident throughout. This tight, trim and witty B action thriller gets right down to brass tacks and hits the stirring spot in a satisfying straightforward and unpretentious manner.
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6/10
Beauty & The Beast
ccthemovieman-17 December 2006
Tommy Lee Jones in a love scene??!! Yikes: what a scary thought. It happened maybe only once on film in his illustrious career. This is that film. With Linda Hamilton, too! I guess this is another version of her TV show, "Beauty and The Beast."

Okay, I don't mean to be that nasty because Jones is a terrific actor and usually a lot of fun to watch, especially when he's chasing bad guys.

This film really had a Class B-type of feel to it despite the presence of those two actors, along with Robert Vaughn and Richard Jaekel....and a very cool car called "Black Moon."

The best thing about the movie was that it was fast-moving, meaning it was interesting enough not to get bored. Other than that, it's an ordinary heist tale that isn't too memorable.
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5/10
Remember, folks... 'from the mind of John Carpenter' isn't the same thing as 'directed by John Carpenter'.
BA_Harrison31 May 2019
John Carpenter might have cooked up the story for Black Moon Rising, but he clearly deemed it unworthy of his further attention, selling the screenplay to be brought to life by the far less talented Harley Cokeliss (Battletruck, Dream Demon). Tommy Lee Jones is the star of the show, playing professional thief Quint, who is hired by the government to steal tapes from a Las Vegas corporation being investigated for racketeering and tax evasion. Hiding the tapes in the back of an experimental prototype car called Black Moon, Quint runs into trouble when the vehicle is stolen by a ring of car thieves, who take it to the fortress-like lair of villain Ed Ryland (Robert Vaughn). Now it is up to Quint, the super-car's owners, and sexy car-jacker Nina (Linda Hamilton) to break into the building and try and retrieve the car and its precious cargo.

Jones is his usual gruff self, and lends this formulaic B-movie nonsense an air of class (although his unibrow is a little distracting) and Hamilton is a capable sidekick and love interest (the actress shedding her clothes for a brief sex scene), but, a couple of well-handled fight scenes aside, Cokeliss' direction is rather pedestrian. For a film about a car that can travel at incredible speed, the action is rather slow at times (the titular car spends much of the time in lock-up). The film's climax, in which the Black Moon leaps from one high-rise building to another, is barely worth the wait (although it obviously impressed someone enough for them to re-enact the scene, not once, but twice, in Fast and the Furious 7).
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5/10
Grand Theft Auto, the 80's edition.
Coventry2 March 2009
"Black Moon Rising" is a formulaic and predictable but nevertheless entertaining and fast-paced thriller based on a story originally written by no less than John Carpenter. Apparently he wrote it in the 70's already, but the content was admirably processed and adapted in order for the events to take place in a typically 80's setting with even faster cars and contemporary hot starlets like Linda Hamilton that are, in fact, most unattractive by today's standards. Tommy Lee Jones, on the other, rarely looked cooler than here in his role as super-thief Sam Quint. Quint is hired to steal a tape containing evidence against a dodgy company, but quickly finds himself chased by the company's fanatic security guards as well as his governmental employer. Quint hides the tape inside a prototype race car (one that reaches up to 350mph!), but before he has a proper opportunity to recover it, the wheels get stolen by a professionally organized syndicate of car thieves. That's how Quint meets and gradually falls for Hamilton's character Nina, as she's a sly and experienced kleptomaniac! "Black Moon Rising" is a prototypic example of an action movie in which one little handling (like hiding a tape in the truck of a car) snowballs into a gigantic avalanche of clichéd but even so enjoyable situations until a grotesque finale is inevitable. In this case the finale involves an impressive piece of stunt car driving at great height. Literally! It's a forgettable and lightweight 80's action movie, but Harry Cokeliss' direction is fairly competent and the dull moments can easily be count on the fingers of one hand. Robert Vaughn is on automatic pilot (pun intended) in his confident role of relentless crime boss and there are some neat cameos from familiar names like Keenan Wynn, William Sanderson and Richard Jaeckal. Nothing special, but definitely a fine choice if you seek mindless rainy-Sunday afternoon entertainment.
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7/10
No deep thinking required here. Just turn off your brain and enjoy.
Hey_Sweden22 July 2019
Tommy Lee Jones plays Quint, a professional thief hired by the government to acquire a tape that will incriminate a major corporation. While he is taking it on the lam, he quickly stashes the tape inside an experimental super-car (the "Black Moon" of the title), which is then stolen by another professional thief, Nina (Linda Hamilton) and her precision team. When the two thieves meet, sparks fly, but Quint will be in big trouble if he doesn't get that tape back. So he teams up with two of the cars' designers to take on Ninas' big bad evil boss Ed Ryland (Robert Vaughn).

The first screenplay ever sold by beloved genre filmmaker John Carpenter, it spent years in development before finally becoming a reality, released by New World in 1986. It's exactly what one would hope it would be: engaging, pedal-to-the-metal nonsense. It's well-paced, it's sexy, it's violent, the car itself is a marvel to behold, and there's some real high-tech finesse displayed by "heroes" and villains alike. It also has a heart, evident in scenes with the great Keenan Wynn (in his final feature film appearance) and Jones.

The real interest here lies in this eclectic cast. We have a typically charismatic, cool-as-can-be Jones (who apparently did most of his own stunts and came up with a lot of Quints' wisecracks) in the lead, an appealing Hamilton as his love interest, football player turned "Police Academy" regular Bubba Smith as a federal agent, Richard Jaeckel, Dan Shor, and William Sanderson as the Black Moons' creators, punk rocker & occasional actor Lee Ving as Jones' persistent nemesis, and Nick Cassavetes as a henchman. Vaughn is smooth and amusingly slimy in the kind of white-collar bad guy he could play in his sleep. Al White, one of the jive talking dudes from "Airplane!", has a bit as a maintenance man.

"Black Moon Rising" is overall a fairly routine, somewhat futuristic B action picture, but is still quite agreeable on that level.

Seven out of 10.
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5/10
Decent enough 80's action thriller.
poolandrews16 January 2011
Warning: Spoilers
Black Moon Rising starts in Nevada in Las Vegas where professional thief for hire Sam Quint (Tommy Lee Jones) is on a job for the US Government, Quint has been hired to break into the Dollar Corporation headquarters & steal certain tax records on a tape that will implicate the company in tax evasion & other criminal activities. Quint breaks into the Dollar Corporation building but sets off the alarms, Quint manages to steal the tape & escape but head of security Marvin Ringer (Lee Ving) & his guards are hot on his tail. Needing to get back to Los Angeles to deliver the tape Quint stops off at a gas station & hides the tape inside a futuristic car capable of speeds in excess of 300mph called the Black Moon that is being driven to Los Angeles to show potential investors, however things become complicated when the Black moon is stolen by car thief Nina (Linda Hamilton) who works for mobster Ed Ryland (Robert Vaughn). On the run from his Government employers, Marvin & his men Quint must get the car & tape back the hard way...

Directed by Harley Cokliss this supposed hi-tech action thriller was probably made because of screenwriter John Carpenter's new found success with films such as Halloween (1978) & The Fog (1980), Black Moon Rising was in fact Carpenter's first script that he ever sold but it remained unmade until he had several hits under his belt & although the finished film apparently has little resemblance to his original script (Qunit was going to be a Vietnam Vet for instance) he also takes an executive producer credit here as well. Although often billed as a hi-tech thriller & even named after the hi-tech car the Black Moon the script surprisingly ignores the super futuristic car for the majority & has it sit idly in Ryland's compound doing absolutely nothing until the final fifteen minutes. Between the start & end it's a fairly plodding thriller as Quint plans a daring raid on Ryland's tower's to steal the car back as well as the subplot about the race to get the stolen tape back & an expected blossoming romance between leading man Tommy Lee Jones & leading lady Linda Hamilton. At almost 100 minutes long the pace is decent enough & there are a few entertaining set-pieces but the lack of Black Moon super car action doesn't help, also the script is rather predictable with all the heroes & villains identified early on. There aren't any twist's or turns or major revelations the way the plot unfolds & for a thriller that is sort of lazy. The character's are alright, Quint is a likable enough hero although strangely he never gets to meet the main villain Ryland. A few poorly written subplots muddy things a bit, the associate that Ryland has killed, the car stealing racket goes nowhere, the two tower's & Ryland's plans are briefly mentioned but never developed neither are Quint's relationship to Marvin or Iron John & the death of the deaf guy is barely mentioned again after it happened.

Maybe the popularity of the TV series Knight Rider (1982-1986) also helped get Black Moon Rising into production & made, the sleek looking black car isn't a million miles off Kitt in appearance although I don't get why it doesn't have any doors & any driver's & passenger's have to climb in through a hole in the roof! Also it has a turbo mode that makes flames shoot from the exhaust, would flames shooting from the exhaust really make any practical difference in terms of speed? Or maybe the makers just thought it looked cool. The Black Moon car is very 80's actually & quite angular & clumsy looking with a red 'go faster' stripe that runs right around it's body. There are a few decent action set-pieces including a car chase through Los Angeles, a scene in which Quint uses a rope to get from one high rise tower to another from the roof, various other car stunts & some good fights & brawl's. There's not much violence & the sex scene is quite tame.

Probably shot on a fairly decent budget the production values are nice enough, the special effects are good as is the stunt work. The acting is alright too, apparently Jeff Bridges, Don Johnson, Tom Berenger & Richard Dean Anderson were all considered for the leading role that eventually went to Oscar winning actor Tommy Lee Jones who at the time was an unknown. Fresh from The Terminator (1984) Linda Hamilton puts in a good performance here actually.

Black Moon Rising is an entertaining enough way to pass 100 odd minutes, it looks a little dated & the lack of action involving the Black Moon car is surprising but it has it moments without ever being brilliant.
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7/10
Great '80s Fun
utgard1413 January 2014
The FBI hires professional thief Quint (Tommy Lee Jones) to steal some data tapes. But he's caught in the act and has to hide the tapes in a prototype super car called the Black Moon. But then the Black Moon is stolen by a car thief (Linda Hamilton) working for big bad guy Ryland (Robert Vaughn). Entertaining popcorn thriller directed by Harley Cokeliss from a story by John Carpenter. Tommy Lee Jones drops one-liners and attracts babes like a true Carpenter hero. Linda Hamilton is great as sexy car thief Nina. She gets the most character attention of anybody in the film. She's also lovely to look at, with her full lips and big '80s hair that she rocked so well. Robert Vaughn redeems himself from Superman III with a nice hissable turn as a villain here. Lee Ving and Bubba Smith appear as thorns in our hero's side. An underrated movie and a fun one.
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5/10
Not a winner, not even a runner-up... too bland
TBJCSKCNRRQTreviews15 November 2010
Quint is a professional thief hired by the government to steal something they can't get legally. He does and gets away, but not without being spotted. Chased by a former "acquaintance", he hides the loot on KITT. Well, OK, not literally... still, it's a duller version of the Knight Rider car(well, the look and speed... there's no AI in this). This vehicle gets hijacked by Nina, who works for Ryland, and with 72 hours to retrieve what he was sent to get, our lead has to find a way to get into the facility(essentially a high tech chop shop, kinda boring). Perhaps the feisty young women is the key? The story is by John Carpenter, and considering that, and its cast, this could have been better. It's basically just... meh. We've seen it before. I got this as part of a 10 sci-fi flicks set. Don't watch this expecting it to really be part of that genre. It's a straight, very 80's action-thriller. We get a little clever dialog, Jones does what he can to make it funny(good, because what little lame comic relief this has doesn't work... and the atmosphere is far too serious), and the characters aren't too bad, if the villain is mighty flat. On the whole, however, it's unsurprising, in spite of a few unexpected turns of events, bits of tension, a chase, a shootout or a physical fight breaking up the long stretches of time where nothing too entertaining happens. It feels like it's more than the 90 minutes it is sans credits. The camera-work is fine. So's the acting(Bubba Smith isn't asked to do a lot, and as such, fares well enough). The theme tune is decent. There is some violence and disturbing content, a sex scene and brief nudity in this. I recommend this to people who love this kind of thing. Anyone else, you can find a better way to spend your time. 5/10
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6/10
Solid caper/thriller with Tommy Lee Jones and Linda Hamilton
Wuchakk20 May 2015
In "Black Moon Rising" (1986) Tommy Lee Jones plays a professional thief hired by the FBI to apprehend a data tape to incriminate a questionable company. Oddly enough, once he gets the tape he's forced to hide it on a prototype supercar, which is stolen by a woman (Linda Hamilton) who works for a professional car-theft ring led by a character played by Robert Vaughn. Richard Jaeckel plays the inventor of the supercar and Bubba Smith an intimidating FBI official.

While the film was written and produced by John Carpenter and features the stars noted above, the budget was limited, which is evident in a few areas. For instance, the supercar -- named Black Moon --looks rather cheesy, although I'm sure it looked neato futuristic in the mid-80s. Nevertheless the outlandish story keeps your attention, particularly the interesting caper in the third act, borrowing elements of other 80's films/shows like James Bond, "Beverly Hills Cop" (1984), Knight Rider and "Terminator" (1984). Hamilton is likable as always, but the feminine eye candy is limited to her and she's too thin for my tastes. Still, you can't go wrong with Linda.

The film runs 100 minutes and was shot in Lancaster, Hollywood and Los Angeles, California.

GRADE: B-
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3/10
This movie is so bad its hurtful to watch
mm-391 November 2001
No story, sums up this no brainier action film; I forgot about this film until I saw an old pay tv trailer for this film. Linda Hamalton does her usual non acting, and uses sexuality as her only acting tribute. She is not that good looking either to play that role. In the end Tommy Lee took the money and ran with this film. There's worse films out there, but they sure are hard to find.
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6/10
Car Jumping between two twin Skyscrapers!!
elo-equipamentos17 October 2017
In another John Carpenter's story this low budge movie have an unbelieving plot, but somehow works as entertainment if you forget some ridiculous scenes like a car jumping between two twin skyscrapers, Tommy Lee Jones in great shape and Linda Hamilton is gorgeous as young car's thief and always a pleasure to see back on screen the great Richard Jaeckel and Robert Vaughn, great action scenes!!

Resume:

First: 2002 / How Many: 2 / Source: TV-DVD / Rating: 6
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6/10
"I'm getting too old for this".
lost-in-limbo21 May 2011
A very smooth, calculative if unfathomable cult heist feature penned by John Carpenter and starring Tommy Lee Jones, Linda Hamilton and Robert Vaughn. The story follows that of a professional thief on his last job, which's hired to steal an important tape for the feds but this is compromised when he hides it in the back of a super-high-charged car to only see it get stolen by a highly organised grand theft auto ring. Carpenter's story is hectic, as what starts off simple, erupts when one unexpected thing after another occurs seeing plans not going to plan. It's downright absurd in its ambitious plotting, but surely entertaining in its chase/heist elements nonetheless. A certain neon-noir quality is etched from its atmospherics and Tommy Lee Jones' cool and collected performance is hypnotically natural. Harley Cokeliss's direction is commendable, concentrating on moody exchanges, violent beatings and a suspenseful cliff-hanger of a climax. The set-pieces are well-timed and precise with a few spectacular moments. Would have been interesting to see what Carpenter could have done with it though. Everything moves at an exciting, rapid pace and then there's Lalo Schifrin's eclectically humming score. The rest of cast equip themselves well. A comfortable Robert Vaughn does his villainous turn in starkly ice-cold manner and Linda Hamilton adds feisty shades to her headstrong performance. Also there's earnest support by Richard Jaeckel, Keenan Wynn, Nick Cassavetes and William Sanderson.
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6/10
Another case where the main star is good enough to lift a movie from its lifeless story
Rodrigo_Amaro10 October 2013
Nothing new in this generic and almost lifeless picture who owns its good moments thankful to the charismatic Tommy Lee Jones, who plays the thief hired by the FBI to steal vital information about a corrupt company. It all complicates when he's followed by the company's security after stealing the info which was hidden in a supersonic new car, object of desire of another thief (Linda Hamilton) who works for another corrupt company, commanded by a powerful businessman (Robert Vaughn). The goal is to take the car and the info out of it, and escape the bad guys who are always on his way.

Even having John Carpenter as a writer of this film, "Black Moon Rising" doesn't fly high in ambition. But it's more of a direction problem (Carpenter is not commanding this but it's unknown Harley Cokeliss who's behind this). It offers moderate action sequences that aren't vivid in the memory for too long - the car chases have their qualities while the fight scenes seem a little exaggerated with everyone fighting karate style instead of a more street level kind of fight, something in which we would believe more if seeing characters like those (robbers and security staff members) doing it. The only real exciting part was when TLJ crossed the two towers, a breathless scene that makes it all the while of going through dramatic conversations and some flirting between Hamilton and Jones, somewhat humored but created without interest for us in the audience. The story just wasn't important. Good for some snores in between.

Why I liked it? Well, Mr. Jones was the man here. Always great and with an unique sense of humor, he makes of this a good entertainment with this good-hearted robber who even has time to teach young beginners in the field, as exemplified right in the first scene. Typical case of a movie where the actor carries the whole movie on his back and succeeds. And it was good to see Bubba Smith doing something outside of "Police Academy", here he plays the FBI agent who commands Jones mission. Oh the car! It was fun to watch, it's really fast and sparks some fire but it's no Batmobile or Kit the supercar.

It was OK. Passable, destined only for those really interested in classic adventure flicks from the 1980's. 6/10
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6/10
What am I going to tell the Italians!
kapelusznik1822 February 2015
Warning: Spoilers
****SPOILERS**** A slim trim & durable Tommy Lee Jones is ex-US government contractor Sam Quint who's given an assignment he can't refuse by top CIA/NAS agent Johnson, played by Big Bad Bubba Smith, to retrieve a computer disc the government needs in a corporate/mob conspiracy case. It's the disc that's needed to put big time tax evader and corporate criminal Marvin Ringer, Lee Ving, behind bars. Being an expert break in artist Quit get his hands on the computer disc but when things get hot, with Winger & his hoods bearing down on him, hides it in a parked car for safe-keeping. It turns out that the car named the "Black Moon" is an experimental model of a super automobile being tested for NASA to be the car of the future going at speeds of 300 MPH.

Before Quint can retrieve the disc "Black Moon" is carjacked, with a number of other cars, from a parking lot by members of the Ed Ryland, Robert Vaughn, car theft ring leaving Quint high and dry and facing the mad as hell Johnson. It's Agent Johnson who give Quint three days to retrieve the disc as well as car or he can forget celebrating his 40th, Quint was 39 at the time, birthday! The film has Qunit soon hook up with Ryland's top car driver Nina, Linda Hamilton, who hijacked the "Black Moon" who wants to get out of the car stealing business. That's in Ryland activities, including contract murder, that can end up with her being either behind bars for life of murdered by his top hit-man & enforcer the creepy looking "Strangler Luis", Nick Cassavetes, if she ever turns evidence against him.

*****SPOILERS**** Chased and brutally beaten up by Ringer and his gang Quint after, in pulling a gun he's been hiding under a car , dispatching most of them gets down to business in finding where the "Black Moon" is being stored. And with the help of the car's designer electronic expert Earl Windom played by the always youthful looking, it's hard to believe that at the time he's just five years away from collecting social security, Richard Jaeckel plans to break into the impregnable storage garage where the "Black Moon" is being kept and takes off with it as Nina does the driving! Tommy Lee Jones and Linda Hamilton make a great combo in the action scenes in the film but as lovers they fall flat on their faces. You never for once get the impression that both of them have any other feelings for each other then in getting revenge on their tormentors, Ringer & Ryland, and using each other to achieve that. But you can't overlook the action sequences in the movie that were top-notch and of course the near fatal beating Quint took from Ringer's hoods that he miraculously survived to live another day. That's when Quint was to turn the tables on Ringer, by giving him a 1st class work-over, at the end of the film.
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10/10
A super car movie to enjoy!
GOWBTW19 March 2020
"Black Moon Rising" is a movie to be recognize with. Plenty of action, adventure, and intrigue to boot. Tommy Lee Jones plays Quint, a thief who helps the Feds bust a corporation that is involved in corruption. He grabs a tape filled with vital information and would put it in an experimental vehicle that runs on water. One night, the car gets stolen and Quint demanded more money from the Feds. The beautiful car thief named Nina(Linda Hamilton) gets a low blow from her boss(Robert Vaughn) she decides help Quint. Both know how to handle the car. It's high octane, except the car doesn't use it. It's fast pace in every way. Great cast, great plot, love the vehicles used in the film. Cult classic gem ALL THE WAY! 5 STARS!
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7/10
Superior and ingenious action movie
robert-temple-19 August 2010
This is a film with complex plot and action, and a great deal of tension. Tommy Lee Jones is a better action hero than most because he actually knows how to show a bit of emotion on his face, which is not a common attribute for some of his rivals on the screen. In fact, he seems human, which action heroes are not supposed to be, as they are mostly meant to be either comic book types or robotic. An action hero who thinks and feels? Hardly likely! Wouldn't thinking and feeling get in the way of the action? So that more or less defines the genre. Action movies come in different grades: (1) more than 100 people get killed, (2) more than 20 get killed, (3) only 2 or 3 get killed, which is really too boring. Also: (1) more than two helicopters, (2) more than one helicopter, (3) only one helicopter (hopelessly low budget). Or: (1) more than 20 cars explode, (2) more than 10 cars explode, (3) forget it. Robert Vaughn (he with the missing 'a' in Vaughan) is superb as the sinister chief villain, an arrogant, rich and powerful mastermind of a massive car theft ring. There are some really brain-teasing aspects to this story of how to crack an uncrackable building, and some good scenes of crossing from one tower to another to gain access. A new type of super-car features in the story, wholly unconvincing automotively, but nevertheless a good story item, especially when its after-burner seems to enable it to drive through the windows of one tower and fly across and crash through the window of the adjoining tower. Pretty advanced stuff for the 1980s! This film still works, all these years later, which shows just how good it was and is. Harley Cokeliss helmed this thruster.
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3/10
Unmemorable actioner.
barnabyrudge10 June 2004
Made before Tommy Lee Jones was a household name, but after Linda Hamilton had endured her first encounter against The Terminator, Black Moon Rising is a simplistic action flick of little consequence. Unmemorable and formulaic from start to finish, it is the kind of film you can watch without once requiring to shift your brain out of first gear. In fact, chances are your brain may not even make it out of neutral!

Super-thief Quint (Jones) steals an important disk. However, when the heat turns on he has to hide this stolen item, so he puts it in a racing car being towed across the American mid-west. His plan is to follow the racing car for a while and to retrieve the disk at a safer time. Seems like a good plan, until ace car thief Nina (Hamilton) shows up and steals the racing car for her boss Ryland (Robert Vaughn). Quint must get his disk back, but he must first get into Ryland's ultra-secure, high-tech lair where the racing car is being kept.

The film was written by John Carpenter (who directed Hallowe'en and The Thing, among others) but you'd be hard pushed to find any of his trademark flair here. This film's director, the little-known Harley Cokliss, strips the script of any novelty it may have had and presents the film in utterly routine fashion. There's an outrageous car stunt near the end which may encourage you to press the rewind button a couple of times, but beyond that Black Moon Rising fails to register a single memorable moment. One for Tommy Lee's completists only, I'm afraid.
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7/10
A Golden image of the 80's
PredragReviews12 May 2016
Sometimes even movies released into regular circulation from the major studios fall through the cracks. This is definitely one of those. Tommy Lee Jones as the industrial spy is as cool and calm as he's ever been. Linda Hamilton is as good as she's ever been and Richard Jaekel turns in another steady performance. The plot is clever and tight enough to satisfy most and the directing by Harley Cockliss (whatever happened to him? This seems to be his only outing) is tight and well paced. The first twenty to thirty minutes of the film were surprisingly good. The story opened briskly, there was some very sharp dialogue (some of it written by John Carpenter, who had originally been hired to direct), and one solid (and underrated) car chase between Jones and Linda Hamilton. This is just a good action thriller, and it has one of the best fist-fight scenes ever.

Overall rating: 7 out of 10.
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6/10
Black Moon Rising
Spuzzlightyear25 March 2012
Somewhat silly actioner here as Tommy Lee Jones (yessss) in all his mid 80's glory, goes against Linda Hamilton (whaaaaa?) and yes, Robert Vaughn to retrieve a tape he stored in a VEHICLE FROM THE FUTURE! Actually, the vehicle is a mighty fast car, and Jones stored that tape in there so that the OTHER bad guys don't find it while punching Jones silly. Meanwhile, Hamilton looks all pouty and mean in her high hair while trying to take orders from her mean boss. But Tommy Lee Jones' sex appeal is too much for her! Ha ha! Soon she's putty in his hands and joins him to get rid of Vaughn. Verrrrrry 80's here, with the clothes the music etc, so you might enjoy it for the sheer cheesiness, other then that... well..
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10/10
Great, lesser known film.
wkozak22128 August 2020
Warning: Spoilers
I like Tommy Lee Jones. This is a lesser known film He made. The story and cast are good. It moves along well. I watch it on a regular basis. The only minus? The car. It looks strange.
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Black Moon Watched, Black Moon Underwhelmed
FieCrier22 February 2003
Though I'd never heard of it, this has some pretty big names in it: Tommy Lee Jones, Linda Hamilton, and Robert Vaughn and some lesser names with familiar faces: Bubba Smith, William Sanderson and Keenan Wynn.

Unfortunately, the three stars do not put in star performances. Somewhat surprisingly, Linda Hamilton is nude in her sex scene. The other actors named above do not get much screen time. William Sanderson inexplicably plays a deaf-mute, while Keenan Wynn plays a man on some sort of life support, and indeed he died later that year in 1986.

The movie itself? It's OK, though I wouldn't bother to watch it again, and will be passing off the copy I own.

The VHS I bought of this (for $1.00) is a "Collector's Edition" "Gold Series." It includes: Coming Attractions (1:55 Min.) [the trailer for Black Moon Rising], FEATURE FILM (Original Version) (100 Min.) [pan and scan], Interview with Tommy Lee Jones and Linda Hamilton (7:13 Min.), "Car Theft" Segment (2:15 Min.), and "Fuel of the Future" Segment (2:20 Min.). These were actually decent extras. Lee and Hamilton talk about this film, and others they've done; the director also appears and among other things discusses the design of the car (based on something actually shown at a car show). The Car Theft Segment discusses the prevalance of car thefts in America at the time, and what cars were stolen the most and so on. The Fuel of the Future Segment was about a real hydrogen-powered truck. Inexplicably, the DVD (I've read) only includes the trailer; how often does a VHS have more features than a DVD?
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7/10
Under-rated 80's fun!
Movie-Misfit25 November 2014
I remember seeing Black Moon Rising on the shelves in the video store when I was just a little one, digging through the dusty cassette covers in the kung fu section. It had caught my eye with that awesome looking car on the front, along with the hilarious Supervan!

And even though it was the eighties, where video stores were a little more lax on ratings, it was still something I never really jumped at hiring.

Moving on 25 years and as both a fan of eighties movies, and as an independent film director, I have been going back to those films of my childhood that I was never lucky enough to see!

I recently picked up Black Moon Rising in my local Poundland, and couldn't wait to get it on screen. As an actor, I think Tommy Lee Jones is fantastic! Yet, at the same time, I find him very hard to watch... I think it's that accent. To me, it seems exaggerated for the most part. But in BMR we have a younger Jones who is a little more appealing.

In a nutshell - John Carpenter's story and screenplay isn't Oscar winning, but it is a hell of a lot better than most eighties flicks, and is highly entertaining! Action, twists, plenty of stars and some chuckles help fill out this adventure thriller that is worth the watch!

In my opinion - Anti-hero Quick (Mr Jones) pulls off his role of a professional thief with such calm and coolness rarely seen in today's cinema. Because of this, he comes across as a much more likable character than usual. Anti-heroine of the hour, Linda Hamilton, squeezes as much of her big hair and cheekbones out of every scene, jumping in on the action as much as her co-star does as the ultimate car thief who falls for her victim.

BMR hardly drags anywhere in its running time, with the excitement kicking off from the get-go mixing car chases with tense escapes, dark murders with great stunt work leading to a fun end showdown that ties it all up nicely!

Black Moon Rising is well worth the watch and still entertains almost 30 years later...
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