5.8/10
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40 user 16 critic

Biggles: Adventures in Time (1986)

Biggles (original title)
Daring British WWI fighter pilot James "Biggles" Bigglesworth and 1980s low-level business executive Jim Ferguson discover that they can time travel to each other's eras. They try to stop the Germans from changing the outcome of WWI.

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Writers:

(characters) (as Capt. W.E. Johns), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... James 'Biggles' Bigglesworth
... Jim Ferguson
Fiona Hutchison ... Debbie Stephens
... Air Commodore Colonel William Raymond
... Eric Von Stalhein
... Chuck Dinsmore
Alan Polonsky ... Bill Kizitski
Francesca Gonshaw ... Marie
... Algy
James Saxon ... Bertie
... Ginger
Roy Boyd ... German N.C.O
Samantha Bradshaw ... Hotel Girl
Andrea Browne ... Lady Buyer
David Butler ... British Officer
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Storyline

One minute the New Yorker advertising expert Jim Ferguson is at a business party -- the next he finds himself way back in 1917 in a plane fight during World War I. Mr. Raymond explains to him that he has a time-twin, to whom he's relocated in space and time whenever one of them is in trouble. So he has to help his twin, biplane pilot Biggles, in his attempt to destroy a German super weapon, that could win their war. Of course it's hard for Jim to explain his sudden disappearances to his fiance, Debbie. Written by Tom Zoerner <Tom.Zoerner@informatik.uni-erlangen.de>

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Taglines:

Meet Jim Ferguson. He lived a daring double-life with one foot in the 20th century and the other in World War I. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

29 January 1988 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Biggles: Adventures in Time  »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$112,132
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

,  »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(DVD)

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Features Peter Cushing's last screen performance, filmed January 21-March 1985 (copyright 1985). See more »

Goofs

When Jim Ferguson first visits Colonel Raymond at Tower Bridge, Raymond hands Ferguson an antiquated 'Celebrity Dinners' card. When Raymond passes Jim the card, it is in a plastic sleeve, then the camera shows the card in detail without the sleeve, and then it returns when Jim hands it back. See more »

Quotes

Biggles: Quick! Untie us before they realise you're not a God, you're just an American.
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Crazy Credits

In the end of the credits it says: Filmed on location in New York - London - and the Western Front 1917. See more »

Connections

Featured in A Matter of Time (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

CHOCKS AWAY
Performed by Jon Anderson
Music by Stanislas Syrewicz
Lyrics by Jon Anderson
Published by Warner Brothers Music/Tizz Music
administrated by Warner Brothers Music
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User Reviews

Just a minor point
24 February 2007 | by See all my reviews

I hate to quibble with a comment but I had to offer some follow up to the comment regarding the disbelief of a German secret weapon during World War I. The concept for a wave type weapon has its origins before World War I with Nicola Tesla, who first postulated the notion of what has become known as scalar waves. Modern physics denies that such waves can exist but Tesla was convinced that they did and according to some he provided it (Tesla Horwitzer). The British actually developed the first theoretic underpinnings for a sound weapon of the type depicted in Biggles and frankly I thought that is where the idea came from. We "moderns" think far to much of our capabilities. What is happening today is that some open minded scientists are revisiting discarded Victorian science. How many people know that the modern principles of William Clerk Maxwell's electromagnetic principles are taught today in a truncated form and that the missing parts may in fact provide the theory for effective wave weapons (ever wonder why the US government spends so much time on Star Wars technology?). By the 1930s, the Germans were developing a number of secret weapons including the so called death rays. I think it prudent to give early modern humans credit for being just as creative as our generation and a lot more open minded.


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