Betty Blue (1986) - News Poster

(1986)

News

Isabelle Huppert talks Oscar prospects and challenging rape drama 'Elle'

Isabelle Huppert talks Oscar prospects and challenging rape drama 'Elle'
“I’ll let myself be surprised, as my good friend Michael Haneke would say,” says French actress about Oscar prospects.

There has been growing buzz in recent weeks around Isabelle Huppert’s chances of clinching Best Actress at the 2017 Oscars for her multi-layered performance as a woman who turns the tables on a rapist in Paul Verhoeven’s French-language thriller Elle.

The French actress – who counts one Bafta, two Palme d’Or, a shared Silver Lion and a slew of life-time achievement tributes among the 60-odd awards she has won over her 40-year career – has never made it to the Academy Award nomination stage before.

But there appears to be a groundswell of feeling at home and in Los Angeles that this should be her year.

A win would come on the back of a high-profile 12 months on the international festival circuit for Huppert, linked to her appearances in Elle as well as French filmmaker Mia Hansen-Love
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Filming underway on Rupert Everett’s Oscar Wilde biopic The Happy Prince

Screen International is reporting that principal photography is now underway on The Happy Prince, a biopic of Oscar Wilde starring Rupert Everett, who also writes and directs.

The Happy Prince “tells the story of the last days of famed playwright Wilde. As he lies on his death bed, the past floods back to him, transporting him to other times and places.”

Everett is joined in the cast of the film by Colin Firth (The King’s Speech), Edwin Thomas (Churchill: 100 Days That Saved Britain), Colin Morgan (Merlin), Emily Watson (War Horse), Tom Wilkinson (Michael Clayton), Miranda Richardson (Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 1), Beatrice Dalle (Betty Blue) and John Standing (The Elephant Man).
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Rupert Everett, Colin Firth begin filming Oscar Wilde biopic

  • ScreenDaily
Rupert Everett, Colin Firth begin filming Oscar Wilde biopic
The Happy Prince chronicles Wilde in the last days of his life.

Rupert Everett’s long-gestating Oscar Wilde biopic The Happy Prince has commenced principal photography in Bavaria, Germany.

Everett directs from his own screenplay and will star alongside Colin Firth (The King’s Speech).

The cast is rounded out by Edwin Thomas (Churchill: 100 Days That Saved Britain), Colin Morgan (Merlin), Emily Watson (War Horse), Tom Wilkinson (Michael Clayton), Miranda Richardson (Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 1), Beatrice Dalle (Betty Blue), and John Standing (The Elephant Man).

The biopic tells the story of the last days of famed playwright Wilde. As he lies on his death bed, the past floods back to him, transporting him to other times and places.

The project will also shoot in France, Belgium and Italy.

Maze Pictures is producing with Entre Chien et Loup in co-production with Palomar. Beta Cinemas is handling worldwide sales.

The project
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'Tommy's Honour' world premiere to open Edinburgh fest

  • ScreenDaily
'Tommy's Honour' world premiere to open Edinburgh fest
Peter Mullan stars as golfing pioneer Tom Morris.

Edinburgh International Film Festival (Eiff) (June 15-26) has announced that the world premiere of Tommy’s Honour will open the 70th edition of the festival on June 15.

Shot entirely on location in Scotland, Tommy’s Honour is based on the true story of golfing pioneer Tom Morris and his turbulent relationship with his son Tommy.

Peter Mullan (Sunshine on Leith, War Horse) and Jack Lowden (War & Peace) take on the roles of father and son and lead a ensemble cast including Ophelia Lovibond (Man Up), Peter Ferdinando (Hyena) and Sam Neill (Jurassic Park) in the role of Alexander Boothby. Key cast are set to be in attendance on opening night.

Director Jason Connery said: “It’s so exciting! I remember standing in the middle of a field in Fife during the shoot and saying to Peter and Jack, Tommy’s Honour might get into the Edinburgh International Film Festival
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'The English Patient' composer Gabriel Yared: temp tracks pose headache

'The English Patient' composer Gabriel Yared: temp tracks pose headache
The Oscar-winning composer talked about his process and collaborations with Anthony Minghella and Xavier Dolan at London’s Barbican.

Oscar-winning composer Gabriel Yared discussed his process and collaborations with directors Anthony Minghella and Xavier Dolan during an event at London’s Barbican on Wednesday (April 20).

Yared told the audience that one of the biggest challenges facing contemporary composers is the temporary music track, which is often used by filmmakers during production to serve as an atmospheric guideline.

Yared explained that the problem occurs when composers are brought on-board late in the production process and have to compete with an existing soundtrack. He said: “Nowadays, when you receive a film it is already temped with pieces of music from this or the other film.

“I think this is really dishonest. The editor and the director get used to the music and then when they hire the composer, he has to fight with all these habits and sometimes even edit
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'The English Patient' composer Gabriel Yared: temp tracks cause headaches

'The English Patient' composer Gabriel Yared: temp tracks cause headaches
The Oscar-winning composer talked about his process and collaborations with Anthony Minghella and Xavier Dolan at London’s Barbican.

Oscar-winning composer Gabriel Yared discussed his process and collaborations with directors Anthony Minghella and Xavier Dolan during an event at London’s Barbican on Wednesday (April 20).

Yared told the audience that one of the biggest challenges facing contemporary composers is the temporary music track, which is often used by filmmakers during production to serve as an atmospheric guideline.

Yared explained that the problem occurs when composers are brought on-board late in the production process and have to compete with an existing soundtrack. He said: “Nowadays, when you receive a film it is already temped with pieces of music from this or the other film.

“I think this is really dishonest. The editor and the director get used to the music and then when they hire the composer, he has to fight with all these habits and sometimes even edit
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes 2016: critic's take

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes 2016: critic's take
2016 looks like a good vintage: Screen’s chief critic and reviews editor Fionnuala Halligan dissects this year’s Competition lineup…

Advance word on the Cannes Competition line-up was muted this year, and smoke signals from Paris indicated that the selection was running very close to the line. Thierry Fremaux talked at the launch press conference about “loyalty” and “risk-taking” in the same breath. While these aren’t two words which tend to mix well at Cannes, the festival’s 2016 line-up certainly promises to deliver fresh film-making. “We know the risks we are taking,” said Fremaux.

There’s little doubt that Cannes 2016 looks like a good vintage. Typically of a festival which always surprises, there’s no way to tell if this will be a good, bad, or - worst of all - indifferent mix until we taste. One note we won’t apparently be savouring in the Competition, however, is a sense of France and its relationship
See full article at ScreenDaily »

First Trailer For Paul Verhoeven's Elle: New Language, Old Tricks?

Paul Verhoeven's films can usually be divided into one of two camps: heavy-masculine sci-fi action (Total Recall, Starship Troopers), or heavy-feminine psychosexual thriller (Basic Instinct, Showgirls). He has returned after nearly a decade's absence, and his new film, Elle (based on the novel by Philippe Djian, who also wrote Betty Blue), clearly seems to fit into the latter category. In a bit of a departure, the film is in french, and stars Isabelle Huppert, one of the great ladies of french cinema. The first trailer (in french without subtitles) has landed.Huppert plays Michele, the wealthy owner of a video game company, who is brutally raped in her home by a stranger. After the event, she first becomes paranoid, then starts to seek out her rapist...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Love | Review

Scorpio Becomes Electra: Noé’s Sex Scenes from a Marriage

The last time we were caught in provocateur Gaspar Noé’s crosshairs it was back in 2009 with Enter the Void, which ended on an orgasmic crescendo by literally fucking the audience. He’s back with more of that kind of sex stuff with Love, a memory poem as sexual odyssey/obsession told via the nostalgia of its tortured protagonist. Sexually explicit, but not necessarily distasteful, Noé is simply showing the general mechanics of people having sex. The rest of the narrative, seeking to explore the undoing of a passionate, youthful relationship, is nothing new as it explores the mundane inevitability of monogamy and how solving such an issue in a union based mostly on sexual attraction proves to be difficult. For those not titillated by a generous helping of spurting fluids and erect penises (including another vagina-cam shot), it’s
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Patsy Kensit interview: ‘I came out of Betty Blue totally stunned’

The actor recalls how Béatrice Dalle set her on a mission to channel French arthouse cool

The 80s were such a great time for movies, and I don’t think that gets celebrated enough. Before the blockbusters took over, people would go to see cult movies in foreign languages that would take over the world on word of mouth. Betty Blue was a film I absolutely adored as an 18-year-old. A girlfriend took me to see it at a cinema on Piccadilly Circus, which sadly isn’t there any more but which used to show all sorts of fringe arthouse movies. I went in not knowing what to expect and came out totally stunned. I was sobbing. Ugly crying! I immediately chopped my hair into a bob and would walk around London in a black Azzedine Alaïa dress and go to the Café de Paris, dancing to La Vie en Rose
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blu-ray Review – Killing Zoe (1993)

Killing Zoe, 1993.

Directed by Roger Avary.

Starring Eric Stoltz, Julie Delpy, Jean-Hugues Anglade, Gary Kemp, Tai Thai, Bruce Ramsay and Ron Jeremy.

Synopsis:

A safecracker arrives in Paris to help a friend with a bank heist but things spiral out of control very quickly.

The Pov camera driving through the streets of Paris, the pulsing techno beat ascending in the background and the name ‘Quentin Tarantino’ plastered across the screen in big letters – yes people, we are back in the early-mid ‘90s. However, Tarantino’s name is under the title of Executive Producer as Killing Zoe was written and directed by Roger Avary, who co-wrote Pulp Fiction with him.

In a role written specifically for him, Eric Stoltz (Pulp Fiction/The Fly II) plays Zed, an American safecracker in Paris on the request of his old friend Eric (Jean-Hugues AngladeBetty Blue). After an encounter in his hotel room with
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Cannes: Isabella Rossellini to discuss sexism

Cannes: Isabella Rossellini to discuss sexism
Isabella Rossellini to discuss on and off camera sexism in cinema at Cannes’ Women in Motion event; other female-focused Cannes events include #SeeHerNow twitter campaign.

Film-maker and actress Isabella Rossellini will kick off the inaugural edition of the Women in Motion programme in Cannes on Thursday (May 14).

A joint initiative between the festival and its new sponsor the luxury goods group Kering, the new event is aimed at highlighting women’s contribution to the film industry.

Alongside French producer Claudie Ossard, the Italian-American actress will discuss the subject of female representation in the film industry and sexism in cinema, both on screen and behind the scenes.

The Blue Velvet actress is in Cannes this year as the president of the Un Certain Regard jury.

Industry veteran Ossard has produced numerous films over the last 30 years including Jean-Jacques Beineix’s Betty Blue and Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Amélie.

Other speakers at the inaugural edition of Women in Motion will include
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Seann William Scott's 5 Favorite Movies Probably Aren't Ones You Would Guess

Seann Williams Scott (aka Stifler from American Pie, aka Doug Glatt from Goon) is a cinephile. You might not’ve guessed that, considering his acting choices haven’t been, shall we say, high caliber. Nonetheless, he loves movies, so picking his top five choices is as difficult as picking your favorite food — depending on his mood, the order and selection changes. Recently, he revealed his favorite films with this stipulation, but even then, they seemed a bit out-of-the-ordinary for the Stifmeister. During a Reddit Ama on Wednesday, Scott was asked to name his top five favorite films. At the time, he said these were at the top of his head at the time of the question: 1. The Inheritance, directed by Per Fly 2. Talk to Her, directed by Pedro Almodóvar 3. Betty Blue, directed by Jean-Jacques Beineix 4. Open Hearts, Susanne Bier 5. Chopper, Andrew Dominik Who ...
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2015: #2. Paul Verhoeven’s Elle

Elle

Director: Paul Verhoeven // Writer: David Birke

One cannot overlook the plentiful cinematic contributions of Dutch auteur Paul Verhoeven, who made waves back in 1973 with Turkish Delight and helmed a handful of notable collaborations starring Rutger Hauer, though they parted ways indefinitely after Verhoeven’s 1985 English language debut, Flesh+Blood. Of course, Verhoeven’s Us big-budget genre work, such as RoboCop (1987) and Total Recall (1990), both spawning recent lackluster remakes, and pulpy neo-noir Basic Instinct (1992) were overshadowed by the debacle that would come to be Showgirls (1995), now celebrated as one of the best worst films ever made. Twenty years after that, with only a few more features since, including 1997’s Starship Troopers, the maligned Hollow Man (2000) and a welcomed return to his native Holland for Black Book (2006), Verhoeven has been mostly an absent figure. In 2012, a mid-length film graced the lineup at the Rome Film Festival, while his long-gestating Jesus of
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The 30 Best Horror Movies of the Past 30 Years

The slasher movie, if we'll admit it to ourselves, is about our fears of teen sexuality. Whether you're a teen made nervous by your own hormones or a parent afraid of what trouble those hormones will get your kid into, the slasher-movie villain is your fears made flesh. But with the release 30 years ago this week (November 9, 1984) of Wes Craven's "A Nightmare on Elm Street," the slasher film entered a new dimension.

With the creation of Freddy Krueger (played indelibly by Robert Englund), who could kill teens in their dreams, the slasher villain proved there was no place that was safe, not even the subconscious.

In retrospect, the genre may have peaked with the release of this film; after all, how many other slasher villains since have been anywhere near as memorable? Unlike his predecessors, Jason Voorhees (of the "Friday the 13th" movies) and Michael Myers (of the "Halloween
See full article at Moviefone »

Trailer for French cop thriller Braquo Trilogy box set

In anticipation of the DVD and Blu-Ray release of season three of French cop thriller Braquo on Monday July 21st, Arrow Films have unveiled a new trailer, which you can watch below…

Created by former Parisian police officer Olivier Marchal, Jean-Hugues Anglade (Betty Blue,Nikita) returns once again as the enigmatic Eddy Caplan, this time leading his team of renegade detectives as their fall from grace in the eyes of the law continues.

Hailed by The Daily Telegraph as France’s answer to The Wire – no small feat, it is a habit of Marchal to strike comparisons to American film and TV classics. His most celebrated work outside of Braquo, 36 Quai des Orfèvres was described as France’s version of Heat, where Marchal matched the American heavyweight acting talent of Robert De Niro and Al Pacino with France’s own heavyweight duo of Gerard Dépardieu and Daniel Auteuil.

Since first airing on the FX channel,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Blu-ray Review: 'Betty Blue' (rerelease)

  • CineVue
★★★★★One of the most iconic French offerings of the eighties, Jean Jacques Beineix's Betty Blue (1986) not only filled cinemas and earned itself BAFTA and Oscar attention, but its César Award-winning poster found itself adorning the bedroom walls of those mesmerised by the astounding central performance of Béatrice Dalle. Reissued on Blu-ray in a deluxe box set, this stunning transfer will delight revisiting fans as well as a whole new league of admirers. Betty (Dalle) and Zorg (Jean-Hugues Anglade) have been dating for a week and they live in a shack on the beach, with the latter working as a handyman to pay the bills.
See full article at CineVue »

Amid depression, bleak stories can be as consoling as self-help

Rather than exhorting the depressed to help themselves, fiction can provide a welcome realisation that we are not alone in despair

The plan to refer people with mild depression and anxiety to books has provoked some fascinating discussions, not least the discussion here of how fiction can be more helpful than non self-help. Having studied philosophy, I still have Elizabeth Anscombe's injunction to stop doing philosophy and start reading novels ringing in my ears, so this is no surprise. What I want to make the case for is those works of fiction that go beyond the positive, beyond stories of survival, works many wouldn't imagine offering help, would even want to keep out of the hands of the mentally fragile.

I made the case for the dangerousness of the blanket prescription of self-help in the comments on other posts here, the guilt when we do not succeed in pulling ourselves from the mire,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Big Shot Movie Club

Via the internets comes news of The Big Shot Movie Club, “a club for movie fans of all kinds.” The Big Shot Movie Club is Sarah Winshall and Julia Bembenek, and they write on their website:

We will watch and discuss three movies we love every month relevant to a specific theme. The movies we watch will always be available online or at a your local video store. Hopefully, each month our loyal club members will learn about some lost gems and be reminded of their favorite classics as they watch and read and comment along with us.

Coming up on their blog are discussions of Peter Weir’s The Mosquito Coast and Jean-Jacques Beineix’s Betty Blue, but I’m also excited by some of the byways the blog has already traveled. For example, following a discussion of Kathryn Bigelow’s debut film, The Loveless (“… this world spreads out
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed