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(1985)

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Smackdown '85: Anjelica, Amy, Meg, Margaret and Oprah

Presenting the Supporting Actresses of '85. It was all scandal all the time at this colorful party. There were three much gossiped about women (a mafia princess, a drunk promiscuous entertainer, and a delusional pregnant nun) and two stubborn women who were just Not having either the gossip or the abusive and cheating men around them. It was the about appreciating the color purple (Oprah & Margaret), seeing red (Amy & Meg), and embracing jet black comedy (Anjelica).

The Nominees 

from left to right: Avery, Huston, Madigan, Tilly, and Winfrey

Oscar celebrated newcomers in 1985 with a shortlist composed entirely of first timers. All five actresses were relatively inexperienced (as Oscar lists go) having made less than ten films each so no overdue conversations were to be had. One of them (Oprah Winfrey) was even making her film debut though the eventual winner (Anjelica Huston) was already Hollywood royalty, being the daughter of
See full article at FilmExperience »

'Dignified, principled and selfless': Stephen Woolley remembers film producer Simon Relph

As a champion of emerging film-makers, Relph’s passion was crucial to the growth of independent British cinema and helped transform Bafta’s profile

I was shocked when I heard that Simon Relph had died unexpectedly at the weekend. He was a colossal influence on many of us breaking through in the British film industry in the 1980s and 90s. He was also a terrific man who supported young writers, directors and producers throughout his career. I first met Simon when I was buying films for my distribution company Palace; having just finished making The Company of Wolves I had ambitions to produce more films. Simon was a big bear of a man with a huge ornamental chain around his neck and a booming voice to match: old-fashioned and posh but with a twinkling eye, like a benign lord mayor from the free state of Pimlico. (It’s entirely typical
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Respected UK producer Simon Relph dies aged 76

Respected UK producer Simon Relph dies aged 76
UK film industry veteran was the founding CEO of British Screen and chairman of BAFTA; his credits included Comrades [pictured].

Respected UK producer and film industry figure Simon Relph has died at age 76.

The British Academy of Film & Television Arts (BAFTA), of which Relph was a former chairman, announced it was saddened to hear of his death.

We are deeply saddened to learn that filmmaker and former Chair of BAFTA Simon Relph has passed away pic.twitter.com/jNkg2XuUku

— BAFTA (@BAFTA) October 31, 2016

Relph was born into cinema. He was the son of the prolific art designer, producer and writer Michael Relph, best known for his long-time collaboration with UK director Basil Dearden, and grandson of the celebrated English actor George Relph, a star of the stage and big screen.

At the time of his birth in 1940, his father was an art director at Ealing Studios, an activity which would eventually expand into producing and some 30 credits including
See full article at ScreenDaily »

BFI Film Academy to receive $1.4m funding boost

  • ScreenDaily
BFI Film Academy to receive $1.4m funding boost
Announcement coincides with the unveiling of six films by BFI graduates.

The UK’s Department for Education has announced it will invest $1.4m (£1m) of funding to support the BFI Film Academy in 2016-17.

The boost is on top of the $5.6m (£4m) the Dfe has invested in the Academy’s residential and regional programmes since 2012.

The move came on the day that 66 young filmmakers from the BFI Film Academy unveiled six short films to British film industry figures including producers Alison Owen (Suffragette, Saving Mr. Banks), Faye Ward (Suffragette, Jane Eyre) and Duncan Kenworthy (The Pass, Love Actually).

The screening and graduation ceremony, held today at BFI Southbank in London, showcased films created as part of the BFI Film Academy course at the National Film and Television School.

BFI CEO Amanda Nevill said: “Talent is everywhere but opportunity is not, and the BFI Film Academy is designed to change that. If UK film
See full article at ScreenDaily »

NBC Reveals 2013-2014 Lineup – Catch Full Preview With Trailers And Clips

The new fall season is closer than you think, and NBC has released their full schedule. Apart from reality favorites The Biggest Loser and The Voice, they are mixing things up quite a bit.

Take a look at a complete preview of the shows coming your way, and mark your calendars. It looks good for NBC this year, and while I’m not sure all of these look like winners, I think you’ll find at least a couple that you’re really going to like.

Blacklist – Fall

The Blacklist — (Photo by: NBC)

For decades, ex-government agent Raymond “Red” Reddington (James Spader) has been one of the FBI’s most wanted fugitives. Brokering shadowy deals for criminals across the globe, Red was known by many as “The Concierge of Crime.”

Now, he’s mysteriously surrendered to the FBI with an explosive offer: he will help catch a long-thought-dead terrorist, Ranko Zamani,
See full article at AreYouScreening »

Mad Men: the future of American film is on television | David Hare

Mad Men's immaculate re-creation of another way of life reminds us vividly of our own

In a hilariously combative interview in the London Evening Standard last March, the best-selling author Lee Child argued the superiority of thrillers over any other kind of fiction. The problem with the literary novel was that it was too easy. He could run up a Martin Amis in three weeks. The only literary writer for whom he had any respect was Ian McEwan, because McEwan was at least trying to "put a suspense dynamic into an intelligent, intellectual novel". So-called serious writers "don't quite get it" because they're usually too fastidious to accept how simple the formula is. "You ask or imply a question at the beginning of a book and you absolutely self-consciously withhold the answer. It does feel cheap and meretricious but it absolutely works."

"Cheap and meretricious" may seem an unlikely
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Mad Men: the future of American film is on television | David Hare

Mad Men's immaculate re-creation of another way of life reminds us vividly of our own

In a hilariously combative interview in the London Evening Standard last March, the best-selling author Lee Child argued the superiority of thrillers over any other kind of fiction. The problem with the literary novel was that it was too easy. He could run up a Martin Amis in three weeks. The only literary writer for whom he had any respect was Ian McEwan, because McEwan was at least trying to "put a suspense dynamic into an intelligent, intellectual novel". So-called serious writers "don't quite get it" because they're usually too fastidious to accept how simple the formula is. "You ask or imply a question at the beginning of a book and you absolutely self-consciously withhold the answer. It does feel cheap and meretricious but it absolutely works."

"Cheap and meretricious" may seem an unlikely
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

David Hare joins Talent Campus mentors

David Hare joins Talent Campus mentors
Cologne, Germany -- David Hare, who wrote the screenplays to Stephen Daldry's "The Reader" and "The Hours" and won a Berlinale Golden Bear in 1985 for his directorial debut "Wetherby," will join a panel of wordsmiths at this year's Berlinale Talent Campus to discuss the art of screenwriting.

Joining Hare is U.S. indie producer Anne Carey ("The Savages," "Thumbsucker") and Brazilian writer-director Danielle Thomas, who, together with Walter Salles, penned and directed "Linha de Passe," "O Primerio Dia" and "Foreign Lands."

Visual effects experts Claudia Meglin and Mark Read, whose credits include "Tropic Thunder" and Clint Eastwood's "Changeling," will offer their support to the Editing Studio, a new Talent Campus program focused on post-production. Also mentoring the program are film editors Job ter Burg ("Black Book") and Susan Korda ("Trembling before G-d").

The 350 young filmmakers attending this year's Berlinale campus also will have a chance to learn from
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

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