The recovery of a microchip off the body of a fellow agent leads James Bond to a mad industrialist who plans to create a worldwide microchip monopoly by destroying California's Silicon Valley.

Director:

John Glen

Writers:

Richard Maibaum (screenplay), Michael G. Wilson (screenplay)
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Popularity
2,643 ( 487)
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Roger Moore ... James Bond
Christopher Walken ... Max Zorin
Tanya Roberts ... Stacey Sutton
Grace Jones ... May Day
Patrick Macnee ... Tibbett
Patrick Bauchau ... Scarpine
David Yip ... Chuck Lee
Fiona Fullerton ... Pola Ivanova
Manning Redwood ... Bob Conley
Alison Doody ... Jenny Flex
Willoughby Gray ... Dr. Carl Mortner
Desmond Llewelyn ... Q
Robert Brown ... M
Lois Maxwell ... Miss Moneypenny
Walter Gotell ... General Gogol
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Storyline

James Bond has one more mission. Bond returns from his travels in the U.S.S.R. with a computer chip. This chip is capable of withstanding a nuclear electromagnetic pulse that would otherwise destroy a normal chip. The chip was created by Zorin Industries, and Bond heads off to investigate its owner, Max Zorin. Zorin may only seem like an innocent man, but is really planning to set off an earthquake in San Andreas, which will wipe out all of Silicon Valley. As well as Zorin, Bond must also tackle May Day and equally menacing companion of Zorin, while dragging Stacy Sutton along for the ride. Written by simon

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Bond Is Back - Action Packed As Ever [UK poster] See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson had noted the explosion in available computer technology, and the public's fascination and concern with all things hi-tech, so they decided that their story should center around the planned destruction of America's Silicon Valley. See more »

Goofs

When Bond is hanging on the ladder during the fire truck chase, there is a mirrored rear-projection shot that shows cars driving on the wrong side of the street. See more »

Quotes

U.S. Police Captain: You're under arrest.
Stacey Sutton: Wait a minute, this is James Stock of the London Financial times.
James Bond: Well, actually, captain, I'm with the British Secret Service. The name is Bond, James Bond.
U.S. Police Captain: Is he?
Stacey Sutton: Are you?
James Bond: Yes.
U.S. Police Captain: And I'm Dick Tracy and you're still under arrest!
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits disclaimer "Neither the name 'Zorin' nor any other name or character in this film is meant to portray a real company or actual person" appears right before the gunbarrel opening sequence. It was added after producers discovered a real company run by a person named "Zoran." See more »

Alternate Versions

In the theatrical version the opening gun barrel dots were red and the rest was black and white. Every home video print since has changed the dots to white. See more »

Connections

Featured in Inside 'A View to a Kill' (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Swan Lake, Op.20
(uncredited)
Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
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User Reviews

 
Walken saves an otherwise forgettable Bond tale
30 April 2009 | by Reef-SharkSee all my reviews

I can say I am a Bond fan, seeing as I own twenty of the twenty-two movies currently on DVD (as of writing this review). So far the only film I haven't enjoyed in the series has been Roger Moore's Moonraker, just because of the over the top silliness and the obvious sell-out to appeal to moviegoers who had just seen Star Wars.

Upon seeing 'A View to a Kill' I instantly was prepared for the worst, and let me tell you this certainly is a bad Bond film. Moore is showing his obvious age, making the relations with his leading ladies undeniably awkward, to say the least. The plot is as simple as they come, and none of the actors are really given any chance with the dialogue they have been given. Moore has very few witty comments in this movie, and most of the other characters are cardboard cut outs.

One thing however manages to make this film better than Moonraker. This is the under-appreciated role of Max Zorin, played by the always wonderful Christopher Walken. I can say without a doubt in my mind that Walken is the single saving grace in this film, exhibiting everything any good Bond villain needs.

Exotic locations: Check! Unique henchmen/henchwoman: Check! Surrounded by beautiful girls: Check Cold and ruthless attitude: Double check! Heartless and chilling disregard for henchmen life: CHECK Walken, with a horrid script (every character in this movie is poorly written) is able to create one of the best Bond villains I've ever seen! The way he talks, the way he acts, everything he does showcases his undeniable talent. So for a movie like 'A View to a Kill' Walken's performance is like shifting through sewage and finding a large diamond ring.

It is because of Walken that I recommend this movie and give it a relatively good rating. Everything else about this film is really forgettable. You'd think a super-strong female henchwoman would make for a memorable moment in the franchise, but this is so poorly handled that she winds up as one of the most forgettable characters in the series, as opposed to one of the best.

Roger Moore, unfortunately, ends his career on Bond in perhaps his own worst performance, which is undeniably sad. It seems that all Bond actors seem to end their careers on the lowest of their films (Connery with 'Diamonds are Forever', Brosnan with 'Die Another Day', and though Dalton was a great Bond, I have to say 'License to Kill' was a weak film) but with those films it has always been more the scripts fault, as opposed to the actor's talent (all three tried their best with the material). Moore is just plain stiff in his last entry! The man seems to have totally lost interest in playing the character by this point.

I consider 1979's 'Moonraker' Moore's worst, but like 'Diamonds are Forever', and 'Die Another Day', Moonraker was more the fault of the script writers; not the Bond actor. In 'A View to a Kill' Moore really shows that he is no longer capable of playing the part, and that is the saddest part of the film (especially seeing Moore seducing girls much younger than himself, with his developing turkey neck becoming quite obvious). Walken makes the movie an enjoyable, B-grade action movie, but as for Bond, this is where it becomes an undeniable fact that Moore has overstayed his welcome as Agent 007.

Moore deserved a better ending, and the fact is that he just shouldn't have come back for this film. Octopussy may have actually been a decent departure, but Moore decided to try one last time and it really is the straw that breaks the Moore Bond's back. Enough was enough, and Moore failed to recognize when he should have cried "when!" I give this film a decent rating for the performance of Christopher Walken, but everything else is very low, and forgettable. Go and see it for Walken, but it is sad to see Moore's finally desperate breaths as he tries to keep the character going one last time.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | Iceland | USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

24 May 1985 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

A View to a Kill See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$10,687,114, 26 May 1985

Gross USA:

$50,327,960

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$50,327,960
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Eon Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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