8.1/10
8,857
225 user 45 critic

Threads (1984)

The effects of a nuclear holocaust on the working class city of Sheffield, England and the eventual long-term effects of nuclear war on civilization.

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2,504 ( 79)

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4 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Karen Meagher ... Ruth Beckett
... Jimmy Kemp
... Mr. Kemp (as David Brierley)
Rita May ... Mrs. Kemp
Nicholas Lane ... Michael Kemp
... Alison Kemp
Henry Moxon ... Mr. Beckett
June Broughton ... Mrs. Beckett
Sylvia Stoker ... Granny Beckett
... Clive Sutton
... Marjorie Sutton
... Bob
... Chief Supt. Hirst
... Medical Officer
Steve Halliwell ... Information Officer
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Storyline

Documentary style account of a nuclear holocaust and its effect on the working class city of Sheffield, England; and the eventual long running effects of nuclear war on civilization. Written by Leisha Sibley

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The closest you'll ever want to come to nuclear war. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Sci-Fi | War

Certificate:

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Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

23 September 1984 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

A Teia  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

£400,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

As part of their research, Mick Jackson and Barry Hines spent a week at the Home Office training centre for 'official survivors' in Easingwold which, according to Hines, showed just 'how disorganised post-war reconstruction would be'. See more »

Goofs

Just after the policeman delivers the secret letter to Clive Sutton, he calls his secretary and starts to read off the names of the people he wants to see in his office. The piece of paper in the close-ups is different from the one we see in the long shot. See more »

Quotes

Public Information Film Announcer: If anyone dies while you are kept in your fallout room, move the body to another room in the house. Label the body with name and address, and cover it as tightly as possible in polythene, paper, sheets or blankets. If, however, you've had a body in the house for more than five days *and* if it is safe to go outside, then you should bury the body for the time being in a trench or cover it with earth, and mark the spot of the burial.
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Connections

Referenced in Talking Dead: TEOTWAWKI (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Alpine Symphony
Written by Richard Strauss
[Opening bars of music for spider web and title is from beginning of Richard Strauss composition 'Alpine Symphony']
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User Reviews

 
Shocking yet extremely realistic nuclear-war telemovie...
23 June 2001 | by See all my reviews

As with most other reviewers who saw this movie, I too have had shocking images burned into my brain that I will never forget.

I first saw this when I was in 8th grade. Our teacher showed us the first half but then she went on sick leave and for some reason, we never got to see the rest of the film. Most of the other students didn't really care, but for years I've always wondered how the movie turned out.

Well I recently rented this after I saw it at video store I just signed up at and all I can say is, "Oh my God." Although captivating, this movie is shockingly and frightfully sickening in the most humane way possible. It focuses on the threat of a nuclear war that is imposed on the residents of an industrial town in Britain, "Sheffield". The nuclear war will affect all of Britain and penultimately, the rest of the world, but we focus on several different characters and families that reside in Sheffield.

We spend the first half of the movie focusing on people in every day life situations which lead into reports of a nuclear war scare and finally, widespread panic in society that results after it becomes apparent that a nuclear war WILL most likely occur.

The halfway point of the movie is the nuclear explosion itself. We see buildings explode, bodies incinerate and perhaps the end of the world as we may all know it.

The second half of the movie focuses on the aftermath of the nuclear devastation and the collapse of a working society. I can't even begin to name all of the horrors that are examined to great detail. We witness cannibalism, famine and disease. We particularly follow the exploits of one character, 'Ruth', pregnant with a child before the nuclear war, we witness the birth of the 'nuclear generation', and particularly, the exploits of her daughter once she is exposed to what world and life has become.

When the credits rolled, my brain couldn't tell me to find the remote and press stop. It was too busy filtering through all the images and 'what if' scenarios that were running through my brain after watching "Threads". I realise that at the time of this movie's initial release, nuclear war was a possible threat. It is now almost 16 years later and this movie still has enough power and grist to tell and show you that ANYTHING 'nuclear' is wrong.

This is a movie every school child should be forced to watch. I admit that it may induce nightmares, but this is a movie that has a message that MUST be received.


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