A Private Function (1984) - News Poster

News

2018 BAFTAs: ‘Three Billboards’ could deliver the first pair of Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor winners in 19 years

2018 BAFTAs: ‘Three Billboards’ could deliver the first pair of Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor winners in 19 years
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” is predicted to take home five BAFTA Awards on Sunday, including trophies for Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell in Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor, respectively. That combo for one film is rare at BAFTA, and if they pull it off, they’d only be the fourth duo to do so and the first in 19 years.

Since BAFTA added supporting categories for the class of 1968, the only films to nab Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor are “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975), which was released a year later in the U.K., for Louise Fletcher and Brad Dourif; “A Private Function” (1984) for Maggie Smith and Denholm Elliott; and “Elizabeth” (1998) for Cate Blanchett and Geoffrey Rush.

See 2018 BAFTAs: Complete racetrack odds in 21 categories

In Oscar history, five films have accomplished this, but there is no overlap with BAFTA: “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951) for Vivien Leigh
See full article at Gold Derby »

The top 20 underappreciated films of 1984

The year that gave us Gremlins, Ghostbusters and The Temple Of Doom also gave us these 20 underappreciated movies...

It's been said that 1984 was a vintage year for movies, and looking back, it's easy to see why. The likes of Ghostbusters and Gremlins served up comedy, action and the macabre in equal measure. James Cameron's The Terminator cemented Arnold Schwarzenegger's star status and gave us one of the greatest sci-fi action movies of the decade.

This was also the year where the Coen brothers made their screen debut with the stunning thriller Blood Simple, and when the Zucker brothers followed up Airplane! with the equally hilarious Top Secret! And we still haven't even mentioned Beverly Hills Cop, This Is Spinal Tap, The Karate Kid, Indiana Jones And The Temple Of Doom and the unexpectedly successful romantic comedy, Splash. Then there was Milos Forman's sumptuous period drama Amadeus, which
See full article at Den of Geek »

Margaret Thatcher and the Movies

Former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher, who died Monday at 87, had a much greater impact on the world of film than just inspiring an Oscar-winning role for Meryl Streep in 2011's "The Iron Lady." The woman who led Great Britain from 1979 to 1990 cast a long shadow over filmmaking in her country during her time in office, inspiring much reaction (pro and con) among filmmakers, inspiring some classic movies, and unwittingly giving major career boosts to some of our era's greatest movie talents. The conventional wisdom about Thatcher's impact on pop culture was that performing artists, being a lefty, proletarian bunch, hated her with a passion. Certainly the British musicians of the '80s, from Billy Bragg to Pink Floyd, composed numerous bitter protest anthems condemning her as a war-mongering tyrant who was strangling the working class. But the movies British filmmakers created during her three terms in office were a lot more ambivalent,
See full article at Moviefone »

Richard Griffiths obituary

Actor of geniality, grace and solemnity, he excelled in playing characters on the margins of society

Richard Griffiths, who has died aged 65 from complications following heart surgery, was a fine actor defined by his largeness of spirit, his comic instinct and his empathy with outsiders, as well as his undeniable physical size. He was the kind of actor whom everyone remembers with affection, whether as the flawed but inspirational Hector in Alan Bennett's The History Boys (first staged in 2004, then filmed in 2006) or as the eccentrically gay Uncle Monty in Bruce Robinson's Withnail and I (1987).

Like most actors who have a thriving career in film and television, he learned his craft in theatre. I first became aware of him in the late 1970s when he rose steadily through the ranks of the Royal Shakespeare Company. I was especially struck by his ability to speak verse with mellifluous clarity.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Richard Griffiths obituary

Actor of geniality, grace and solemnity, he excelled in playing characters on the margins of society

Richard Griffiths, who has died aged 65 from complications following heart surgery, was a fine actor defined by his largeness of spirit, his comic instinct and his empathy with outsiders, as well as his undeniable physical size. He was the kind of actor whom everyone remembers with affection, whether as the flawed but inspirational Hector in Alan Bennett's The History Boys (first staged in 2004, then filmed in 2006) or as the eccentrically gay Uncle Monty in Bruce Robinson's Withnail and I (1987).

Like most actors who have a thriving career in film and television, he learned his craft in theatre. I first became aware of him in the late 1970s when he rose steadily through the ranks of the Royal Shakespeare Company. I was especially struck by his ability to speak verse with mellifluous clarity.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Forgotten: So Lonesome

  • MUBI
A friend, who was perhaps not quite tactful enough to become the movie producer he wanted to be, once met the actress Kerry Fox, and told her that her work in Jane Campion's An Angel at My Table was the best female film performance he had ever seen, "Apart from Maggie Smith in The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne."

While one might think that coming second in the whole of cinema history was still doing pretty well, and that there's no shame in coming second to Maggie Smith in anything, and that the addition of another name and title to the statement shows that my friend had really thought about it and wasn't just blowing smoke up the Fox ass, she apparently didn't look all that pleased. Perhaps she would prefer to be judged up against all actors, not just a female subset. But perhaps the problem was that
See full article at MUBI »

Peter Pan tale Finding Neverland to become West End musical

Stage show based on 2004 film, which explores the inspiration behind the famous character, to debut in London next year

The producers behind Oscar winning films such as The King's Speech, are turning their attention to London's West End with plans for their first stage musical.

The Weinstein Company's show, Finding Neverland, is based on their 2004 film of the same name starring Johnny Depp and Kate Winslet, and tells the story of how Jm Barrie's friendship with a young family inspired Peter Pan. It will be directed by Rob Ashford, whose last West End musical was Shrek, and whose Donmar theatre production of Anna Christie was acclaimed this year. British actor Julian Ovenden is set to play Barrie.

"There are a handful of films Harvey [Weinstein] has worked on that seemed like they could become musicalised, and this was the best fit," said Ashford. The musical was originally planned to open in California last month,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

MacKintosh's Betty Blue Eyes To Close In The West End

  • WENN
MacKintosh's Betty Blue Eyes To Close In The West End
The West End musical based on Dame Maggie Smith's award-winning film A Private Function is set to close due to poor ticket sales.

Betty Blue Eyes is the stage adaptation of the 1984 movie, which tells the tale of a small town raising a pig to slaughter in honour of the wedding of Princess Elizabeth and Philip Mountbatten, now Britain's monarch and consort.

Critics hailed the production as a triumph, but the acclaim failed to get people in seats and theatre impresario Sir Cameron Mackintosh has decided to close the musical next month.

He says, "I am enormously proud of Betty. I know she will eventually have her day and another life.

"It is very curious. After such amazing reviews and positive word of mouth, no-one knows the real reason why Betty couldn't find a bigger audience.

"We have been consistently playing to just over 50 per cent, but it just isn't enough to cover the costs. Of course I am disappointed, but I'm not despondent."

Weekend Shopping Guide 4/22/11: I It’s Your Speech, Charlie Brown

  • Quick Stop
The weekend’s here. You’ve just been paid, and it’s burning a hole in your pocket. What’s a pop culture geek to do? In hopes of steering you in the right direction to blow some of that hard-earned cash, it’s time for the Fred Weekend Shopping Guide - your spotlight on the things you didn’t even know you wanted…

(Please support Fred by using the links below to make any impulse purchases - it helps to keep us going…)

I had worries that The King’s Speech (Anchor Bay, Rated R, Blu-Ray-$39.99 Srp) wouldn’t live up to all of the kudos that had been thrown its way, but I was pleasantly surprised to find a genuinely enjoyable cinematic experience about a very personal struggles of a very private figure, held together by a genuinely stellar cast. Bonus materials include a behind-the-scenes featurette, a cast and director Q&A,
See full article at Quick Stop »

Pete Postlethwaite – His Five Best Screen Performances

2011 started on a very sad note with the announced passing of British actor Pete Postlethwaite from cancer. You only had to see his performance in Ben Affleck’s The Town to know he was ill, but still he managed to put in a great turn as Northern Irish gangster, Fergie, who owned the streets of Charlestown, Boston.

Postlethwaite, born in Warrington, Cheshire, in 1946, worked not only in films but television and theatre. In the 1990s, he made two films with Steven Spielberg: The Lost World: Jurassic Park and Amistad. Spielberg called him “the best actor in the world”.

Down the years he appeared in the likes of Alien 3, The Last of the Mohicans, A Private Function, The Constant Gardener, The Shipping News, Dark Water, Inception, Romeo and Juliet, and for sci-fi fans, you might even remember him in the Rutger Hauer flick Split Second.

Killing Bono (released 1st
See full article at FilmShaft.com »

New this Week: ‘The Eagle,’ ‘Just Go with It’ and ‘Life as We Know It (DVD)’

Hitting movie theaters this weekend:

The EagleChanning Tatum, Jamie Bell, Donald Sutherland

Gnomeo and Juliet – James McAvoy, Emily Blunt, Maggie Smith

Just Go with ItAdam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston, Brooklyn Decker

Justin Bieber: Never Say NeverJustin Bieber, Boys II Men, Miley Cyrus

In Her SkinGuy Pearce, Sam Neill, Miranda Otto (limited)

Movie of the Week

The Eagle

The Stars: Channing Tatum, Jamie Bell, Donald Sutherland

The Plot: In Roman-ruled Britain, a young Roman soldier endeavors to honor his father’s memory by finding his lost legion’s golden emblem.

The Buzz: It didn’t blow me away, but the trailer for The Eagle did make me want to check this one out in the theater. The cinematography and filming locales of The Eagle look to be fantastic. The score in the trailer was fairly derivative; standard music to augment the excitement and adventure that such a film promises.
See full article at Scorecard Review »

Alejandro Amenabar's "Tesis" Statement and More New on DVD

  • IFC
A look at what's new on DVD today:

"Tesis" (1996)

Directed by Alejandro Amenabar

Released by Widowmaker Films

Long out of print, "The Others" director Alejandro Amenabar's debut about a grad student's discovery of a snuff film is being remastered and rereleased by Widowmaker Films.

"Alice in Murderland" (2011)

Directed by Dennis Devine

Released by Brain Damage Films

A year after Tim Burton's "Alice in Wonderland" scared the bejeezus out of kids in multiplexes everywhere, this horror take on Lewis Carroll's classic fairy tale aims to do so intentionally on DVD players around the country.

"America, America" (1963)

Directed by Elia Kazan

Released by Fox Home Entertainment

Elia Kazan's most personal film based on the story of his uncle's immigration to the United States from Turkey, where as a Greek his family is persecuted, was already released as part of last year's Kazan boxed set, but now will be
See full article at IFC »

Pete Postlethwaite obituary

Oscar-nominated British actor with a vast range who could move between comedy and tragedy with ease

The actor Pete Postlethwaite had a face that elicited many similes, among them "a stone archway" and "a bag of spanners". These unflattering descriptions, plus his tongue-twisting surname, would suggest an actor with a career limited to minor supporting roles. But Postlethwaite, who has died of cancer aged 64, played a vast range of characters, often leading roles, on stage, television and film.

He was at ease in switching the masks of tragedy and comedy. The working-class martinet father he played in Terence Davies's film Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), which Postlethwaite credited as his big break, can be seen as paradigmatic of his career. Postlethwaite powerfully conveyed the father's double-sided nature: at one moment he is tenderly kissing his children goodnight, the next he is ripping the tablecloth off in a rage.

Postlethwaite was
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Pete Postlethwaite obituary

Oscar-nominated British actor with a vast range who could move between comedy and tragedy with ease

The actor Pete Postlethwaite had a face that elicited many similes, among them "a stone archway" and "a bag of spanners". These unflattering descriptions, plus his tongue-twisting surname, would suggest an actor with a career limited to minor supporting roles. But Postlethwaite, who has died of cancer aged 64, played a vast range of characters, often leading roles, on stage, television and film.

He was at ease in switching the masks of tragedy and comedy. The working-class martinet father he played in Terence Davies's film Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), which Postlethwaite credited as his big break, can be seen as paradigmatic of his career. Postlethwaite powerfully conveyed the father's double-sided nature: at one moment he is tenderly kissing his children goodnight, the next he is ripping the tablecloth off in a rage.

Postlethwaite was
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Pete Postlethwaite: a career in clips

The actor Pete Postlethwaite died yesterday at the age of 64. We look back over his career in clips

It's difficult to know which is the more telling statement about Pete Postlethwaite, who died yesterday. That Steven Spielberg called him "the best actor in the world", after working with him on Jurassic Park sequel The Lost World. Or that Postlethwaite reacted to the praise with such dry deprecation: "I'm sure what Spielberg actually said was, 'The thing about Pete is that he thinks he's the best actor in the world.'"

A man with a face just made for immortalising on Mount Rushmore, Postlethwaite was an ensemble actor to his core; transparently decent and generous, hardly a limelight hogger. The role that first brought him to the attention of most people was Giuseppe Conlon, inmate dad to Daniel Day-Lewis's falsely imprisoned Guildford Four suspect Gerry in 1993's In the Name of the Father.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Pete Postlethwaite: a career in clips

The actor Pete Postlethwaite died yesterday at the age of 64. We look back over his career in clips

It's difficult to know which is the more telling statement about Pete Postlethwaite, who died yesterday. That Steven Spielberg called him "the best actor in the world", after working with him on Jurassic Park sequel The Lost World. Or that Postlethwaite reacted to the praise with such dry deprecation: "I'm sure what Spielberg actually said was, 'The thing about Pete is that he thinks he's the best actor in the world.'"

A man with a face just made for immortalising on Mount Rushmore, Postlethwaite was an ensemble actor to his core; transparently decent and generous, hardly a limelight hogger. The role that first brought him to the attention of most people was Giuseppe Conlon, inmate dad to Daniel Day-Lewis's falsely imprisoned Guildford Four suspect Gerry in 1993's In the Name of the Father.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gilly Coman obituary

Actor with starring role in 80s sitcom Bread

The actor Gilly Coman, who has died of a suspected heart attack aged 54, was catapulted to national fame as Aveline, Ma Boswell's precious daughter, in Carla Lane's television sitcom Bread, which followed the working-class, devoutly Catholic, Liverpudlian Boswell family as they exploited the social security system in Thatcher's Britain.

Aveline was an aspiring model with red hair who dressed in miniskirts, stockings and high heels. She was cosseted by her mother, Nellie (Jean Boht), and four brothers, who vetted her boyfriends and made her wear a whistle around her neck in case of attack. Coman gave a bit of her own dizzy personality to Aveline, carving out one of the most memorable characters in the show.

When Bread started in 1986, more than three million people across Britain were unemployed. Critics disliked the programme – particularly for its stereotypical portrayal of scousers sponging
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Image Acquires Rights to George Harrison's Handmade Library Titles

Image Acquires Rights to George Harrison's Handmade Library Titles
Late Beatle George Harrison may no longer be with us, but his film production work lives on thanks to indie home entertainment giant, Image. The company has announced the acquisition of Harrison's Handmade Films library, a collection of titles produced by the rock icon which showcases a wide range of movies covering multiple genres. The DVD/Blu-ray and electronic debuts are set for undisclosed times. The label's first theatrical release is the seminal Terry Gilliam flick, Time Bandits, which was one of several of Handmade's titles under threat of a remake several years ago, but nothing has come of it to date.

The fantasy adventure tale about a young boy who befriends a group of time-traveling dwarves isn't the only hit to Harrison's credit. "The Handmade library contains some of the greatest and most influential films of the past thirty years," said Ted Green, chairman and CEO of Image. "Their
See full article at Cinematical »

Image Licenses Harrison’s Handmade Films

Chatsworth-based home entertainment distributor Image Entertainment has licensed the 30-plus-title Handmade Films library, which includes such movies as “Time Bandits,” “The Long Good Friday” and “Mona Lisa.” Handmade was created in 1978 by former Beatle George Harrison and producer Denis O’Brien. The label’s first theatrical release was Terry Gilliam’s 1981 “Time Bandits.” Other titles include “Withnail and I,” “How To Get Ahead In Advertising,” “A Private Function” and “Water.”

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/content_display/film/news/e3iff897d5a72be7303294b8fadf34b9f15
See full article at FilmNewsBriefs »

Episode Titles Revealed

Steven Moffat has revealed the titles of the first few stories of Matt Smith's era as the Eleventh Doctor.

The series begins with The Eleventh Hour written by Moffat himself and is believed to follow directly on from the regeneration in The End of Time. Episode Two is The Beast Below also by Moffat with Episode Three seeing the return of the Doctor's greatest foe in Victory of the Daleks by Mark Gatiss.

Speaking to Doctor Who Magazine, Moffat also confirmed a number of guest stars for the new series coming to the UK in the Spring.

Arthur Darvill will join the cast of Episode One as Rory. Darvill was previously seen in Little Dorrit, playing Tip Dorrit in the 2008 series.

Sophie Okonedo stars in Episode Two. She recently seen playing Winnie Mandela in the film Mrs Mandela and has previously starred in series such as Criminal Justice, Father and Son and Clocking Off.
See full article at The Doctor Who News Page »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed