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Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment (1985) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Cameo (1)  | Spoilers (1)
When Hooks punches Proctor in the jaw, the punch she lands on his jaw was real, and by accident.
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G.W. Bailey had hoped to return as Lieutenant Harris, but was passed over in favor of Art Metrano as the antagonist in this film and Police Academy 3: Back in Training (1986). Bailey instead took a job working with Director Hugh Wilson on Rustlers' Rhapsody (1985). On a day off, G.W. visited this movie's set to film an uncredited cameo in the wedding reception scene. He appeared from behind, as the man having his picture taken by the photographer.
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Some original cast members had allegedly complained about losing screentime to the new cast members. At one point, shooting was shut down and a mediator was brought in to mellow the cast.
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Tim Kazurinsky was originally only to appear in the opening scene. But Director Jerry Paris enjoyed the chemistry between Kazurinsky and Bobcat Goldthwait, so the character of Sweetchuck was created during filming.
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The only movie in the original Police Academy heptalogy in which Callahan (Leslie Easterbrook) does not appear. After the first film was completed, Leslie was pregnant with a baby daughter, which prevented her from working on this sequel.
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Tim Kazurinsky's character was to be called Mr. Schewchuk, as the name appears on the store window. Jerry Paris changed the name to Sweetchuck, after Bubba Smith flubbed several takes trying to pronounce "Schewchuk".
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Lance Kinsey (Proctor) mentioned in an interview that he met his then-girlfriend Julie Brown (Chloe) while working on this film.
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The only Police Academy movie to feature Commandant Eric Lassard's brother, Pete (Howard Hesseman). Howard was asked to reprise his role in later sequels, but he outright refused, saying that he regretted doing this film in the first place.
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The original director, James Signorelli, was considered "too edgy" by the producers, and was soon replaced by Jerry Paris.
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Though Proctor's first name is never mentioned in any of the Police Academy movies, it does appear in the script for this movie. The description of his first scene refers to him as Sergeant Carl Proctor.
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Screenwriter Barry W. Blaustein stated that he was approached during production by Bubba Smith (Hightower), who complained about being given a minimal amount of lines, compared to the other actors. The reason for this was that Blaustein had been told by producers that "Bubba couldn't do dialogue".
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Bill Paxton was offered the role of Zed, but turned it down, because the contract required him to also work in the future sequels. He ended up doing Aliens (1986) instead.
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Despite the fact that no such character exists in the movie, a blonde policewoman appears on the official poster. This was an inside joke made by the producers, as they had also requested that the same "sexy girl" be included on an earlier version of the first film's poster.
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Two of Jerry Paris' children were cast in this movie. His daughter Julie Paris was given a small role as the checkout girl to whom Zed talks, while his son Andrew Paris played Bud, the punchy brother of Kathleen Kirkland.
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When Mahoney meets some of Zed's gang members while undercover, a Russian vulgarity is written among the graffiti on a phone booth. This was an inside joke, as Producer Paul Maslansky is of Russian descent.
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In an interview prior to the start of production, David Graf said that he would not mind doing a series of Police Academy movies. "I'd do it strictly for the money. (Wife) Kathy and I went to a party at Hugh Wilson's, and it was all very ritzy, with valet parking, caviar, champagne, all that, and while we were there, surrounded by all that luxury, Kathy and I were talking about how we were going to pay the gas bill. The gas company had told us they were going to discontinue service the next day. I don't want to be in that position again. So, yes, I would do a series of Police Academies, for money." True to his word, Graf appeared in all seven of the original Police Academy movies.
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Upon being cast as seamstress Chloe Daniels, the love interest of Mahoney, Julie Brown had been told her role was that of a major ensemble player. Julie was later disappointed to learn that several of her scenes with Steve Guttenberg, bar two nearly cameo appearances, had been cut from the final print.
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Although everyone (even in subsequent Police Academy movies), refers to Tim Kazurinsky's character as "Sweetchuck", his name is actually "Schewchuk". This is evidenced on the sign outside his store. The name is a reference to the set decorator of the original Police Academy (1984) film, Steve Shewchuk.
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Though Tim Kazurinsky is called Sweetchuck in the movie, in the credits his character name is "Merchant".
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When Schtulman throws his sock at the locker, a magnet was placed inside the sock, to ensure it clung to the locker.
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The service station attendant is reading a copy of The Wrestler magazine. This was written into the scene by Barry W. Blaustein, an avid professional wrestling fan, who would later go on to direct Beyond the Mat (1999).
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Michael Winslow (Jones), David Graf (Tackleberry), and George Gaynes (Commandant Lassard) are the only actors who appeared in all seven Police Academy movies. Winslow even goes a step beyond this, as he is the only actor who not only appeared in all seven Police Academy movies, but also had a regular role on Police Academy: The Series (1997).
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According to Producer Paul Maslansky , the returning actors and actresses from the original Police Academy (1984) wanted more money to work on the sequel. The above-the-line (principal talent) costs were about one and a half million dollars, including Maslansky's own fee.
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Shooting in Los Angeles was more expensive for this sequel than for the first film, according to Paul Maslansky. "Not because of the city officials; they provide every co-operation. It's the merchants and the property owners who can really hit you. There's so much filming going on, that they ask for a lot of money for location sites, parking, et cetera."
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Steve Guttenberg almost did not return for the sequel, as he was not pleased with the script as originally presented to him. After some re-writes, and a bigger paycheck, Guttenberg was happy to reprise Mahoney.
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In an interview shortly after this film's release, Steve Guttenberg said that being in a major hit like Police Academy (1984), that earned a lot of money and extremely nasty reviews, was both a help and a hindrance. "There's an advantage because the film makes a lot of money. But the disadvantage is that they want you to keep doing it again and again. You can get stuck in them. I was very reluctant to do the sequel, but there's a contract. They've got options on me forever, but they're very understanding about my desires."
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At one point, Schtulman says "we do what Baretta would do". Art Metrano (Mauser) guest starred on four episodes of Baretta (1975). Howard Hesseman (Pete), Sandy Ward (Sistrunk), Gerrit Graham (Ace from Police Academy 6: City Under Siege (1989)) and George Gaynes's wife Allyn Ann McLerie (Irina Petrovskaya from Police Academy: Mission to Moscow (1994)) each made a guest appearance on Baretta (1975) also.
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The name "Mauser" was derived from a German arms manufacturer of a line of bolt-action rifles and semi-automatic pistols.
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(At around forty-seven minutes) When Jones mimics Bruce Lee, the movements of his lips do not match what he says. It is not a goof, but a joke on the imported Lee's films, which were dubbed very poorly.
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Mahoney's gang name is Jughead. On the Archie cartoon show, Jughead was voiced by Howard Morris, the same actor who voiced Sweetchuck in Police Academy: The Series (1988).
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According to Bubba Smith, he made more money from his work on this film alone, than he had earned in ten years of playing professional football. This was due to Bubba having requested a 2 percent piece of the movie's profits, in lieu of a higher salary prior to shooting.
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Lou the dog was played by a large Newfoundland dog called Kodiak. The dog was very stubborn, often dictating how many takes he wanted for a shoot. If he felt like he had had enough of a particular re-take, he would stop performing, to the letdown of his trainers Rob Bloch and Kim Lindemeon. However, he saved the life of his owner Kathy Cullen, by alerting her to a dangerous fire that was burning in her house. Kodiak subsequently earned the Newfoundland Club's prestigious "Versatility" award.
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The only Police Academy movie to not use the familiar logo font when the title comes up on screen, instead using the font used for the on screen credits.
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Mauser only appeared in this film and Police Academy 3: Back in Training (1986), but reprised the role in the television series episode Police Academy: The Series: Hoop Nightmares (1998).
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In one scene, Hightower is talked into tossing a football to some men. The scene is a tribute to Bubba Smith's career as a professional football player.
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The Police Academy films follow one of two Narrative styles, the first style which is used in the first, third and fourth films, features the Academy prominently whilst the Bad Guys only appear at the end, whilst the second style used in the second, fifth, sixth and seventh films consists of brief uses of the Academy whilst the Bad Guys are featured throughout the film.
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Cameo 

G.W. Bailey: (At around one hour and twenty-three minutes) Wedding guest posing for photo.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

(At around one hour and twenty-three minutes) The monster truck Tackleberry drives away in, with his bride, is Bigfoot 3, the third version of the first ever monster truck built. The truck returns (Bigfoot 6) in Police Academy 6: City Under Siege (1989), also driven by Tackleberry.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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