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11 Most ‘Hair-Raising’ Movie Moments, From ‘There’s Something About Mary’ to ‘Edward Scissorhands’ (Photos)

11 Most ‘Hair-Raising’ Movie Moments, From ‘There’s Something About Mary’ to ‘Edward Scissorhands’ (Photos)
Some of the most iconic hair fashion statements of all time are movie hair. Cher Horowitz in “Clueless.” Holly Golightly in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” David Bowie’s hair in “Labyrinth.” The list goes on. And then there’s the not so good hair moments in the movies. Arguably the most famous of those is having its 20th anniversary this week, the infamous “hair gel” scene from “There’s Something About Mary.” In honor of that classic and unfortunate hair gag, we decided to look at some of the other times that things in movies got a little hairy.

“There’s Something About Mary”

Why does this scene work as well as it does? The gag isn’t especially plausible, but it taps into that crippling fear that the world somehow knows the dirty deed you’ve just done in the privacy of your own bathroom. And Cameron Diaz’s hair,
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‘Amadeus’ voted top Best Picture Oscar winner of the 1980s, rising above all ‘mediocrities’ [Poll Results]

While Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) says in “Amadeus” that he speaks for “all mediocrities in the world,” the film clearly rises above such mediocrities, according to you. The 1984 movie is your favorite Best Picture winner of the 1980s, based on the votes of a recent Gold Derby poll. The biopic about the complicated relationship between Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce) narrowly won the vote over the nine other ’80s winners.

Amadeus” won with 25% of the vote, just barely beating “Rain Man” (1988), which earned 21%. The rest of the top five included “Platoon” (1986) in third at 15%, “Terms of Endearment” (1983) in fourth with 12% and “Ordinary People” (1980) in fifth at 10%. No other films came close to this top five, with a three movies earning 4% of the vote: “Driving Miss Daisy” (1989), “Gandhi” (1982) and “The Last Emperor” (1987). “Out of Africa” (1985) drummed up 3% of the vote while “Chariots of Fire” (1981) was the last to
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Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]
Milos Forman, who passed away on April 13, has been voted your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1980s for his masterwork “Amadeus.” The biopic chronicled the infamous rivalry between Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce). Much like the film itself being your preferred Best Picture winner of the ’80s, Forman was your choice for the top Best Director winner of the decade in Gold Derby’s recent poll.

Forman won with 22% of the vote, with Oliver Stone (“Platoon”) coming in second place with a respectable 16%. It was a tie for third between James L. Brooks (“Terms of Endearment”) and Robert Redford (“Ordinary People”) at 11% apiece. Sydney Pollack (“Out of Africa”) rounded out the top five with 9% of the vote. Next up, Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) came in sixth with 8%, Richard Attenborough (“Gandhi”) came in seventh with 7% and Bernardo Bertolucci (“The Last Emperor”) came in
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Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]
The 1980s saw several legendary dames winning Best Actress at the Oscars, including academy favorites like Katharine Hepburn and Meryl Streep. The entire decade was a good one for women dominating their films, like Sissy Spacek, Shirley MacLaine, Sally Field, Geraldine Page, Cher and Jodie Foster. The ’80s also set records that still stand today, with Marlee Matlin being the youngest Best Actress winner at age 21 and Jessica Tandy being the oldest winner at 80.

So which Best Actress winner from the ’80s is your favorite? Look back on each of their performances and vote in our poll below.

Sissy Spacek, “Coal Miner’s Daughter” (1980) — The ’80s began with Spacek earning her Oscar for playing country music star Loretta Lynn in the biopic “Coal Miner’s Daughter.” Spacek earned a previous nomination for “Carrie” (1976) and four subsequent nominations, for: “Missing” (1982), “The River” (1984), “Crimes of the Heart” (1986) and “In the Bedroom” (2001).

SEE
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Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]
The 1980s at the Oscars were full of matches between Best Picture and Best Director. Of the 10 Best Director winners, eight of their films won Best Picture, including Robert Redford, Richard Attenborough, James L. Brooks, Milos Forman, Sydney Pollack, Oliver Stone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Barry Levinson. The only instances of a Picture/Director split were in 1981 when Warren Beatty won for “Reds” and 1989 when Stone won his second directing Oscar for “Born on the Fourth of July.”

So who is your favorite Best Director winner of the ’80s? Look back on each of their wins and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert Redford, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Redford’s directorial debut proved he had the chops, winning for the harrowing domestic drama “Ordinary People.” Redford’s other Oscar nominations were for “The Sting” (1973) in Best Actor and both Best Picture and Best Director for “Quiz Show” (1994).

SEEDirector Ava DuVernay
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What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1980s: ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘Platoon’ … ? [Poll]

What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1980s: ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘Platoon’ … ? [Poll]
The 1980s were a big era for the “epic” movie winning Best Picture at the Oscars. “Chariots of Fire,” “Gandhi,” “Out of Africa,” “Platoon” and “The Last Emperor” all share that grand-scale style of film that tends to be rewarded decade after decade at the Oscars. The ’80s also included just as many intense character studies winning Best Picture, including “Ordinary People,” “Terms of Endearment” and “Amadeus,” while others were on the lighter side, like “Rain Man” and “Driving Miss Daisy.”

In this divisive decade, which Best Picture-winning film remains your favorite? Let us take a look back on each winner and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Ordinary People” (1980) — “Ordinary People,” Robert Redford‘s directing debut, has gotten a bad rap over the years for beating Martin Scorsese‘s “Raging Bull,” but it remains one of the most moving films to win Best Picture. The film tells
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Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)

Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)
Over the past month, the Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars has looked back at Meryl Streep’s 21 Oscar nominations, including her 2018 bid for “The Post.” We have considered the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

For a film buff and awards season aficionado, there is perhaps no more exhilarating a journey than going back to revisit all 21 Streep performances that brought her to the Oscars, plus her competition over the years – a grand total of 105 performances, most richly deserving of their recognition.

While Streep has three Academy Awards — for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979), “Sophie’s Choice” (1982) and “The Iron Lady” (2011) — a case could surely be made that she has deserved even more. She is at her career-best in “The Bridges of Madison County” (1995) and, if not for the juggernaut that was Shirley MacLaine in “Terms of Endearment
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Meryl Streep (‘The Post’) loses at Oscars for 18th time, crushing her own record

Meryl Streep (‘The Post’) loses at Oscars for 18th time, crushing her own record
Over the past four decades Meryl Streep has amassed 21 Oscar nominations, more than any performer in Academy Awards history. She won three of those races, making her a member of the exclusive three-timers club of which there are only two other living members: Daniel Day-Lewis and Jack Nicholson. However, there’s a unique downside to Queen Meryl’s Oscar reign. After losing Best Actress for “The Post” Sunday night to Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Streep now has 18 Oscar failures on her hands, extending her record as the biggest acting loser of all time.

SEE2018 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 90th Academy Awards [Updating Live]

Streep’s losses straddle 39 years, including 15 as Best Actress and 3 as Best Supporting Actress. Her first loss for “The Deer Hunter” (1978) happened four decades ago, setting the stage for a remarkable Oscar trajectory full of a few ups and many, many downs.
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2018 Oscars: Best Picture presenters should be Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep (even though she stars in a nominee)

2018 Oscars: Best Picture presenters should be Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep (even though she stars in a nominee)
To celebrate the 90th anniversary of the Academy Awards, the two all-time nominations champs (and two-time co-stars) Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep should hand out Best Picture on March 4. Yes, Streep stars in one of the nine nominees, “The Post.” But does anyone really think that film will win?

While Nicholson has been the academy’s go-to guy for this award a record eight times, Streep — who has starred in a couple of Best Picture champs (“Kramer versus Kramer” and “Out of Africa”) — has never had a turn. Sure, she has presented other awards, both honorary and competitive, but surely it is time for her to be given this honor, especially in the year in which she reaped her 21st Oscar nomination. And with her headline-making speeches, viewers are sure to stay tuned to the end of the show to see if Streep once again goes after Donald Trump.

Nicholson
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Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Post,’ ‘Sophie’s Choice,’ ‘Adaptation’

  • Gold Derby
Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Post,’ ‘Sophie’s Choice,’ ‘Adaptation’
Is Meryl Streep the greatest film actor of all time? That might just be the case judging from her record 21 Oscar nominations. Then again, with three wins she trails Katharine Hepburn, who still holds the record with four acting victories, so Streep still has a big brass ring to reach for if she wants to be the undisputed queen of screen actors. She earned her latest bid this year for her leading role as Washington Post publisher Kay Graham in Steven Spielberg‘s “The Post.” Where does her latest entry rank in her filmography? Even though it seems like she’s nominated for just about every performance she gives it’s not just those Oscar-anointed roles that count among her strongest achievements. Tour through our photo gallery above of Streep’s 25 greatest performances ranked from worst to best.

See Meryl Streep joins ‘Big Little Lies’ season 2 – will she win her fourth Emmy?
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Doubt’: A look back at her 15th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘Doubt’: A look back at her 15th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 15 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

On the heels of the spectacular box office success of “The Devil Wears Prada” (2006), Meryl Streep was more a household name than ever. Even teens and twentysomethings who weren’t terribly familiar with Streep’s body of work could now instantly identify the actress who made Miranda Priestly a big screen icon. She quickly hopped aboard three projects for 2007, all of which screamed ‘Oscar contender’ on paper and unfortunately, all of which underperformed upon release.

First, there was “Evening,” a supremely sleepy drama which, despite the presence of heavyweights including Streep, Glenn Close, Claire Danes and Vanessa Redgrave, failed to leave
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Meryl Streep in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’: A look back at her 14th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’: A look back at her 14th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 14 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

The three years following “Adaptation” (2002) did not produce an Oscar nomination for Meryl Streep – her longest drought since the early 1990s, following “Postcards from the Edge” (1990). That is not to say, of course, that these years were without substantial Streep contributions to the big and small screens and stage.

Sans a brief cameo portraying herself in the Matt DamonGreg Kinnear conjoined twins comedy “Stuck on You,” Streep did not grace the silver screen in 2003. She did, however, hit the television circuit in a big way with her reunion alongside filmmaker Mike Nichols on the HBO production of Tony Kushner‘s “Angels in America.
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Best Actress predictions: Which nominee is most likely to upset Frances McDormand at 2018 Oscars? [Poll]

Best Actress predictions: Which nominee is most likely to upset Frances McDormand at 2018 Oscars? [Poll]
Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) has won all the major precursors so far leading up to the Oscars, including Critics’ Choice, Golden Globe and SAG. Oscar voters like to sometimes go their own way, though, and in an incredibly strong year for Best Actress like this one, this could be the one acting category in which we see an upset. Who do You think could take her down at the 2018 Oscars? Vote in our poll below.

McDormand does already have an Oscar, for 1996’s “Fargo,” so it is possible that voters will look for an alternative in this category. The actress is openly apathetic to campaigning and award shows in general and even said in her SAG speech earlier this year, “There’s a lot of young ones coming up and they need doorstops, too.” Will Oscar voters heed her advice and vote for some emerging talent instead?
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How Billy Wilder made the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre fun … and romantic

Google “Valentine’s Day movies” and you’ll find all sorts of links to stories about romantic movies to watch on Valentine’s Day with your significant other.

I don’t have to actually go to any of those links to know what I’ll find there: “When Harry Met Sally,” “Titanic,” “Pretty Woman,” “Sleepless in Seattle,” “The Notebook” and some versions of “Romeo & Juliet” and “An Affair to Remember.” (Okay, I did go to one link and found the subversive suggestion of “Harold and Maude.” I liked that.)

If you were to confine your search to romantic movies that won the Oscar, you’d be surprised how few there are. In nine decades, voters found less than 10 swooners to honor as the year’s best picture. And that counts love stories that do not end well for the lovers, including “Casablanca,” “West Side Story,” “Titanic” and “Out of Africa.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Does Best Picture champ have to win an acting award first?

2018 Oscars: Does Best Picture champ have to win an acting award first?
The Shape of Water” numbers three acting bids among its leading 13 Academy Awards nominations for lead Sally Hawkins and supporting players Richard Jenkins and Octavia Spencer. According to our exclusive Oscar odds none of them is predicted to win on March 4. Should that scenario play out, does that mean that their film won’t win Best Picture?

Not so fast.

While 53 of the 89 Best Picture champs to date include an Oscar-winning performance, 36 of them (40%) did not win any acting awards. And among those three dozen winners are four of the eight films — “The Hurt Locker” (2009), “Argo” (2012), “Birdman” (2015) and “Spotlight” (2016) — decided by preferential ballot under the newly expanded slate of Best Picture nominees.

Surprisingly, an even dozen of the Best Picture winners did not even reap any acting nominations. That is welcome news for “Arrival,” which does not number an acting bid among its eight nominations. However, four of those films
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep’s real-to-reel portrayal of Katharine Graham adds to Oscars record that will never be matched

Meryl  Streep’s real-to-reel portrayal of Katharine Graham adds to Oscars record that will never be matched
Everyone knows that Meryl Streep, a current Best Actress nominee for “The Post,” is the Secretariat of the Oscar nominations race. Her 21 combined lead and supporting actress bids put her nine lengths ahead of runners-up Katharine Hepburn and Jack Nicholson and 11 ahead of legends Bette Davis and Sir Laurence Olivier.

But in a race within a race that has gotten less attention, Streep has an even greater lead: in nominations for roles based on real people. The number is either 10 or 11 depending on whether you agree with the fashion world and me that she plays a thinly-veiled version of Vogue’s Queen of Mean editor Anna Wintour in “The Devil Wears Prada.”

Streep, in fact, has more nominations for playing historical figures than any other major actor has even attempted. Hepburn, the most heralded and honored actress before Streep came along, played only a half-dozen real life characters in her long career,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Out of Africa’: A look back at her sixth Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘Out of Africa’: A look back at her sixth Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 6 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

In 1984, after making three consecutive appearances in Best Actress at the Academy Awards, Meryl Streep was a no-show on nominations morning for her turn opposite Robert De Niro in “Falling in Love.” The odds of a Streep return to the ceremony looked strong, however, in 1985. Two projects were lined up, both awards-caliber on paper.

The first of these two projects landed with a whimper that September. “Plenty,” directed by acclaimed Australian filmmaker Fred Schepisi, with a screenplay by David Hare, cast Streep as an Englishwoman searching for fulfillment in life after serving with the French Resistance in World War II. While the film has its passionate defenders to this day,
See full article at Gold Derby »

After DGA and PGA wins, is ‘The Shape of Water’ a lock at Oscars for Best Picture? Not so fast!

After DGA and PGA wins, is ‘The Shape of Water’ a lock at Oscars for Best Picture? Not so fast!
You are named Best Director by your guild, your film takes the top prize from the producers and it ties the record most Oscar nominations (14). So you must be a lock to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards, right? That was what “La La Land” helmer Damien Chazelle must have thought in 2017. And that did come to pass, for about two minutes, before “Moonlight” was revealed as the rightful winner of the top Academy Award.

Could that same scenario play out this awards season?

Guillermo del Toro won the Best Director prize for “The Shape of Water” at the DGA Awards on Feb. 3. On Jan 20, his fantasy film was named Best Picture by the Producers Guild of America. And it reaped a leading 13 Oscar nominations on Jan. 23.

Yes, with his win at the Directors Guild of America Awards, del Toro is looking even more like a sure-thing to take home an Oscar for helming.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 DGA Awards winner is Oscar frontrunner for Best Director

On Feb. 3, the Directors Guild of America will reveal its pick for the best film helmer of the year at the 70th annual edition of its awards. The five DGA nominees are: Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”), Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”), Martin McDonagh (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Christopher Nolan (“Dunkirk”) and Jordan Peele (“Get Out”).

All but McDonagh are in contention at the Academy Awards. If one of the four double nominees wins with the guild, they are all but certain to take home the Oscar on March 4 as well. The DGA aligned itself with the Academy Awards calendar in 1950. Since then all but seven of its winners for Best Director have repeated at the Oscars.

Although the DGA does an outstanding job at anointing the eventual Oscar winner, it is less sure-footed at previewing the five Oscar nominees. In its first 15 years, there were anywhere from four to 18 DGA nominees.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Is Meryl Streep the greatest film performer of all time? According to Oscar voters over the past 40 years, that might just be the case with her record shattering 21 nominations and 3 wins. She earned her latest bid for the 2017 film “The Post” for portraying “Washington Post” publisher Kay Graham in the Steven Spielberg movie. Where does her latest entry rank in her filmography? Tour through our photo gallery above of Streep’s 25 greatest performances ranked from worst to best.

Streep snagged her first Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress for “The Deer Hunter” (1978) and picked up her first trophy in that category the very next year for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979). She subsequently snagged two prizes in the lead category (“Sophie’s Choice” in 1982 and “The Iron Lady” in 2011) and competed 17 more times: Best Actress for “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” (1981), “Silkwood” (1983), “Out of Africa” (1985), “Ironweed” (1987), “A Cry in the Dark” (1988), “Postcards from the Edge
See full article at Gold Derby »
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