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Doc NYC 2018: 9 Under-the-Radar Documentaries to See At This Year’s Festival

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC 2018: 9 Under-the-Radar Documentaries to See At This Year’s Festival
New York City’s annual Doc NYC festival kicks off this week, boasting a packed slate of some of this year’s most remarkable documentaries. If you’ve been looking to beef up on your documentary consumption, Doc NYC is the perfect chance to check out a wide variety of some of the year’s best fact-based features. Ahead, we pick out 9 of our most anticipated films from the fest, including awards contenders, a handful of buzzy debuts, and more.

Doc NYC runs November 8 – 15 in New York City and you can check out the full schedule right here.

Amazing Grace

In 1972, a year after their massive hit “Woodstock,” Warner Bros. set out to produce an Aretha Franklin performance documentary. It took 43 years, but producer Alan Elliott completed the film shot by Oscar-winning director Sydney Pollack (“Out of Africa”) over two nights at the New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in Los Angeles.
See full article at Indiewire »

Aretha Franklin Concert Movie ‘Amazing Grace’ Wants to Dive-Bomb the 2019 Oscar Race

Aretha Franklin Concert Movie ‘Amazing Grace’ Wants to Dive-Bomb the 2019 Oscar Race
In 1972, a year after their massive hit “Woodstock,” Warner Bros. set out to produce an Aretha Franklin performance documentary. It took 43 years, but producer Alan Elliott completed the film shot by Oscar-winning director Sydney Pollack (“Out of Africa”) over two nights at the New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in Los Angeles. Now, after decades of setbacks both technical and emotional, after Franklin’s long illness and death from pancreatic cancer on August 16, Elliott clinched a deal with her estate to release the movie — and submitted the paperwork in time for Academy’s October 1 submission deadline.

Elliott has booked the film for week-long Oscar-qualifying runs in Los Angeles and New York. And by dropping the mic on November 5 with the announcement that the movie would show November 12 (introduced by Reverend Al Sharpton) at Doc NYC, he’s set in motion the next phase of his campaign. The movie still needs to land a sales agent,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Aretha Franklin Concert Movie ‘Amazing Grace’ Wants to Dive-Bomb the 2019 Oscar Race

Aretha Franklin Concert Movie ‘Amazing Grace’ Wants to Dive-Bomb the 2019 Oscar Race
In 1972, a year after their massive hit “Woodstock,” Warner Bros. set out to produce an Aretha Franklin performance documentary. It took 43 years, but producer Alan Elliott completed the film shot by Oscar-winning director Sydney Pollack (“Out of Africa”) over two nights at the New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in Los Angeles. Now, after decades of setbacks both technical and emotional, after Franklin’s long illness and death from pancreatic cancer on August 16, Elliott clinched a deal with her estate to release the movie — and submitted the paperwork in time for Academy’s October 1 submission deadline.

Elliott has booked the film for week-long Oscar-qualifying runs in Los Angeles and New York. And by dropping the mic on November 5 with the announcement that the movie would show November 12 (introduced by Reverend Al Sharpton) at Doc NYC, he’s set in motion the next phase of his campaign. The movie still needs to land a sales agent,
See full article at Indiewire »

20 Crazy Details Behind The Making Of Ladyhawke

1985 was an eventful year for Hollywood, seeing the releases of such timeless classics as The Goonies, Back to the Future, The Breakfast Club, Brazil, Witness, Out of Africa, and Ran. It also saw the release of Ladyhawke, a medieval fantasy/romance/action/adventure telling the unforgettable tale of the love story between Isabeau (Michelle Pfeiffer) and Navarre (Rutger Hauer).

The two lovers are placed under a terrible curse whereby she transforms into a hawk during the day, and he into a wolf by night. Together with the help of the crafty thief Gaston (Matthew Broderick), they must attempt to lift the curse for the sake of true love.

Since its initial release, Richard Donner’s Ladyhawke is probably best remembered among mainstream audiences today for its highly divisive synth-rock score. Any contemporary review or more recent retrospective of the film makes mention of Andrew Powell’s music. While certainly noteworthy and memorable,
See full article at Screen Rant »

Peter Bart: Robert Redford Chooses Early Retirement At 82

Peter Bart: Robert Redford Chooses Early Retirement At 82
James Stewart decided to retire from acting in 1978 at age 70 when The Magic of Lassie flopped (“I can’t even open a dog movie.”) Paul Newman said he considered calling it quits after shooting a dim 1998 movie called Twilight (“You start to deliberately lose your memory.”)

Robert Redford didn’t specify his reasons this week for his announced retirement from acting, but perhaps the title of his final film The Old Man and the Gun provided a signal. The famously reticent actor, now 82, has worked steadily and productively but had not starred in a genuine hit since Out of Africa 30 years ago. His glory days, of course, were the ’70s when he won plaudits in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and All the President’s Men. But Redford’s legacy also resides in the Sundance Film Festival and in his fervent advocacy of environmental causes.

In the heyday of the studio system,
See full article at Deadline »

Robert Redford's Best Movies According to IMDb Users

Robert Redford's Best Movies According to IMDb Users
Robert Redford has announced his retirement from acting after nearly 60 years on screen. Here is a look at his top 20 feature films, according to IMDb user ratings. How many have you seen?

1. 'The Sting' (1973): 8.3

2. 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid' (1969): 8.1

3. 'All the President's Men' (1976): 8

4. 'Captain America: The Winter Soldier' (2014): 7.8

5. 'Jeremiah Johnson' (1972): 7.6

6. 'Three Days of the Condor' (1975): 7.5

7. 'The Natural' (1984): 7.5

8. 'A Bridge Too Far' (1977): 7.4

9. 'A River Runs Through It' (1992): 7.3

10. 'The Chase' (1966): 7.3

11. 'Out of Africa' (1985): 7.2

12. 'Sneakers' (1992): 7.1

13. 'Spy Game' (2001): 7.1

14. 'The Way We Were' (1973): 7.1

15. 'This Property Is Condemned' (1966): 7.1

16. 'Brubaker' (1980): 7.1

17. 'The Candidate' (1972): 7.1

18. 'An Unfinished Life' (2005): 7

19. 'Barefoot in the Park' (1967): 7

20. 'All Is Lost' (2013): 6.9

Ranking correct as of Aug. 7, 2018.

Robert Redford says 'The Old Man & The Gun' will be final acting role

Robert Redford says 'The Old Man & The Gun' will be final acting role
Eighty-one-year-old does not rule out more directing.

Robert Redford has said in an interview that upcoming Toronto world premiere The Old Man & The Gun will be his final acting role.

Speaking to Entertainment Weekly, Redford, 81, confirmed earlier statements made in 2016.

“Never say never, but I pretty well concluded that this would be it for me in terms of acting, and [I’ll] move towards retirement after this ’cause I’ve been doing it since I was 21,” said the actor.

“I thought, Well, that’s enough. And why not go out with something that’s very upbeat and positive?”

Redford said he
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Robert Redford to Retire From Acting: ‘That’s Enough’

  • The Wrap
Robert Redford to Retire From Acting: ‘That’s Enough’
Robert Redford says he’s retiring from acting after teasing the end of his career in front of the camera two years ago.

“Never say never, but I pretty well concluded that this would be it for me in terms of acting, and [I’ll] move towards retirement after this ’cause I’ve been doing it since I was 21,” Redford, 81, told Entertainment Weekly. “I thought, Well, that’s enough. And why not go out with something that’s very upbeat and positive?”

In 2016, Redford said he would retire from acting after “The Old Man & the Gun,” which stars Casey Affleck and Donald Glover, and focus more on directing. “The Old Man & the Gun” will be screening at next month’s Toronto International Film Festival.

Also Read: Robert Redford To Retire From Acting: 'Goodbye To All That'

“I’m getting tired of acting,” Redford had said. “I’m an impatient person,
See full article at The Wrap »

11 Most ‘Hair-Raising’ Movie Moments, From ‘There’s Something About Mary’ to ‘Edward Scissorhands’ (Photos)

11 Most ‘Hair-Raising’ Movie Moments, From ‘There’s Something About Mary’ to ‘Edward Scissorhands’ (Photos)
Some of the most iconic hair fashion statements of all time are movie hair. Cher Horowitz in “Clueless.” Holly Golightly in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” David Bowie’s hair in “Labyrinth.” The list goes on. And then there’s the not so good hair moments in the movies. Arguably the most famous of those is having its 20th anniversary this week, the infamous “hair gel” scene from “There’s Something About Mary.” In honor of that classic and unfortunate hair gag, we decided to look at some of the other times that things in movies got a little hairy.

“There’s Something About Mary”

Why does this scene work as well as it does? The gag isn’t especially plausible, but it taps into that crippling fear that the world somehow knows the dirty deed you’ve just done in the privacy of your own bathroom. And Cameron Diaz’s hair,
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Amadeus’ voted top Best Picture Oscar winner of the 1980s, rising above all ‘mediocrities’ [Poll Results]

While Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) says in “Amadeus” that he speaks for “all mediocrities in the world,” the film clearly rises above such mediocrities, according to you. The 1984 movie is your favorite Best Picture winner of the 1980s, based on the votes of a recent Gold Derby poll. The biopic about the complicated relationship between Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce) narrowly won the vote over the nine other ’80s winners.

Amadeus” won with 25% of the vote, just barely beating “Rain Man” (1988), which earned 21%. The rest of the top five included “Platoon” (1986) in third at 15%, “Terms of Endearment” (1983) in fourth with 12% and “Ordinary People” (1980) in fifth at 10%. No other films came close to this top five, with a three movies earning 4% of the vote: “Driving Miss Daisy” (1989), “Gandhi” (1982) and “The Last Emperor” (1987). “Out of Africa” (1985) drummed up 3% of the vote while “Chariots of Fire” (1981) was the last to
See full article at Gold Derby »

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]
Milos Forman, who passed away on April 13, has been voted your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1980s for his masterwork “Amadeus.” The biopic chronicled the infamous rivalry between Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce). Much like the film itself being your preferred Best Picture winner of the ’80s, Forman was your choice for the top Best Director winner of the decade in Gold Derby’s recent poll.

Forman won with 22% of the vote, with Oliver Stone (“Platoon”) coming in second place with a respectable 16%. It was a tie for third between James L. Brooks (“Terms of Endearment”) and Robert Redford (“Ordinary People”) at 11% apiece. Sydney Pollack (“Out of Africa”) rounded out the top five with 9% of the vote. Next up, Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) came in sixth with 8%, Richard Attenborough (“Gandhi”) came in seventh with 7% and Bernardo Bertolucci (“The Last Emperor”) came in
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]
The 1980s saw several legendary dames winning Best Actress at the Oscars, including academy favorites like Katharine Hepburn and Meryl Streep. The entire decade was a good one for women dominating their films, like Sissy Spacek, Shirley MacLaine, Sally Field, Geraldine Page, Cher and Jodie Foster. The ’80s also set records that still stand today, with Marlee Matlin being the youngest Best Actress winner at age 21 and Jessica Tandy being the oldest winner at 80.

So which Best Actress winner from the ’80s is your favorite? Look back on each of their performances and vote in our poll below.

Sissy Spacek, “Coal Miner’s Daughter” (1980) — The ’80s began with Spacek earning her Oscar for playing country music star Loretta Lynn in the biopic “Coal Miner’s Daughter.” Spacek earned a previous nomination for “Carrie” (1976) and four subsequent nominations, for: “Missing” (1982), “The River” (1984), “Crimes of the Heart” (1986) and “In the Bedroom” (2001).

SEE
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]
The 1980s at the Oscars were full of matches between Best Picture and Best Director. Of the 10 Best Director winners, eight of their films won Best Picture, including Robert Redford, Richard Attenborough, James L. Brooks, Milos Forman, Sydney Pollack, Oliver Stone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Barry Levinson. The only instances of a Picture/Director split were in 1981 when Warren Beatty won for “Reds” and 1989 when Stone won his second directing Oscar for “Born on the Fourth of July.”

So who is your favorite Best Director winner of the ’80s? Look back on each of their wins and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert Redford, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Redford’s directorial debut proved he had the chops, winning for the harrowing domestic drama “Ordinary People.” Redford’s other Oscar nominations were for “The Sting” (1973) in Best Actor and both Best Picture and Best Director for “Quiz Show” (1994).

SEEDirector Ava DuVernay
See full article at Gold Derby »

What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1980s: ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘Platoon’ … ? [Poll]

What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1980s: ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘Platoon’ … ? [Poll]
The 1980s were a big era for the “epic” movie winning Best Picture at the Oscars. “Chariots of Fire,” “Gandhi,” “Out of Africa,” “Platoon” and “The Last Emperor” all share that grand-scale style of film that tends to be rewarded decade after decade at the Oscars. The ’80s also included just as many intense character studies winning Best Picture, including “Ordinary People,” “Terms of Endearment” and “Amadeus,” while others were on the lighter side, like “Rain Man” and “Driving Miss Daisy.”

In this divisive decade, which Best Picture-winning film remains your favorite? Let us take a look back on each winner and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Ordinary People” (1980) — “Ordinary People,” Robert Redford‘s directing debut, has gotten a bad rap over the years for beating Martin Scorsese‘s “Raging Bull,” but it remains one of the most moving films to win Best Picture. The film tells
See full article at Gold Derby »

Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)

Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)
Over the past month, the Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars has looked back at Meryl Streep’s 21 Oscar nominations, including her 2018 bid for “The Post.” We have considered the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

For a film buff and awards season aficionado, there is perhaps no more exhilarating a journey than going back to revisit all 21 Streep performances that brought her to the Oscars, plus her competition over the years – a grand total of 105 performances, most richly deserving of their recognition.

While Streep has three Academy Awards — for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979), “Sophie’s Choice” (1982) and “The Iron Lady” (2011) — a case could surely be made that she has deserved even more. She is at her career-best in “The Bridges of Madison County” (1995) and, if not for the juggernaut that was Shirley MacLaine in “Terms of Endearment
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep (‘The Post’) loses at Oscars for 18th time, crushing her own record

Meryl Streep (‘The Post’) loses at Oscars for 18th time, crushing her own record
Over the past four decades Meryl Streep has amassed 21 Oscar nominations, more than any performer in Academy Awards history. She won three of those races, making her a member of the exclusive three-timers club of which there are only two other living members: Daniel Day-Lewis and Jack Nicholson. However, there’s a unique downside to Queen Meryl’s Oscar reign. After losing Best Actress for “The Post” Sunday night to Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Streep now has 18 Oscar failures on her hands, extending her record as the biggest acting loser of all time.

SEE2018 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 90th Academy Awards [Updating Live]

Streep’s losses straddle 39 years, including 15 as Best Actress and 3 as Best Supporting Actress. Her first loss for “The Deer Hunter” (1978) happened four decades ago, setting the stage for a remarkable Oscar trajectory full of a few ups and many, many downs.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Best Picture presenters should be Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep (even though she stars in a nominee)

2018 Oscars: Best Picture presenters should be Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep (even though she stars in a nominee)
To celebrate the 90th anniversary of the Academy Awards, the two all-time nominations champs (and two-time co-stars) Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep should hand out Best Picture on March 4. Yes, Streep stars in one of the nine nominees, “The Post.” But does anyone really think that film will win?

While Nicholson has been the academy’s go-to guy for this award a record eight times, Streep — who has starred in a couple of Best Picture champs (“Kramer versus Kramer” and “Out of Africa”) — has never had a turn. Sure, she has presented other awards, both honorary and competitive, but surely it is time for her to be given this honor, especially in the year in which she reaped her 21st Oscar nomination. And with her headline-making speeches, viewers are sure to stay tuned to the end of the show to see if Streep once again goes after Donald Trump.

Nicholson
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Post,’ ‘Sophie’s Choice,’ ‘Adaptation’

  • Gold Derby
Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Post,’ ‘Sophie’s Choice,’ ‘Adaptation’
Is Meryl Streep the greatest film actor of all time? That might just be the case judging from her record 21 Oscar nominations. Then again, with three wins she trails Katharine Hepburn, who still holds the record with four acting victories, so Streep still has a big brass ring to reach for if she wants to be the undisputed queen of screen actors. She earned her latest bid this year for her leading role as Washington Post publisher Kay Graham in Steven Spielberg‘s “The Post.” Where does her latest entry rank in her filmography? Even though it seems like she’s nominated for just about every performance she gives it’s not just those Oscar-anointed roles that count among her strongest achievements. Tour through our photo gallery above of Streep’s 25 greatest performances ranked from worst to best.

See Meryl Streep joins ‘Big Little Lies’ season 2 – will she win her fourth Emmy?
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Doubt’: A look back at her 15th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘Doubt’: A look back at her 15th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 15 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

On the heels of the spectacular box office success of “The Devil Wears Prada” (2006), Meryl Streep was more a household name than ever. Even teens and twentysomethings who weren’t terribly familiar with Streep’s body of work could now instantly identify the actress who made Miranda Priestly a big screen icon. She quickly hopped aboard three projects for 2007, all of which screamed ‘Oscar contender’ on paper and unfortunately, all of which underperformed upon release.

First, there was “Evening,” a supremely sleepy drama which, despite the presence of heavyweights including Streep, Glenn Close, Claire Danes and Vanessa Redgrave, failed to leave
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’: A look back at her 14th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’: A look back at her 14th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 14 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

The three years following “Adaptation” (2002) did not produce an Oscar nomination for Meryl Streep – her longest drought since the early 1990s, following “Postcards from the Edge” (1990). That is not to say, of course, that these years were without substantial Streep contributions to the big and small screens and stage.

Sans a brief cameo portraying herself in the Matt DamonGreg Kinnear conjoined twins comedy “Stuck on You,” Streep did not grace the silver screen in 2003. She did, however, hit the television circuit in a big way with her reunion alongside filmmaker Mike Nichols on the HBO production of Tony Kushner‘s “Angels in America.
See full article at Gold Derby »
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