After being exiled from the most advanced town in post apocalyptic Australia, a drifter travels with a group of abandoned children to rebel against the town's queen.
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Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mel Gibson ... Mad Max
Bruce Spence ... Jedediah
Adam Cockburn Adam Cockburn ... Jedediah Jnr.
Tina Turner ... Aunty Entity
Frank Thring ... The Collector
Angelo Rossitto ... The Master
Paul Larsson ... The Blaster
Angry Anderson ... Ironbar
Robert Grubb ... Pig Killer
George Spartels ... Blackfinger
Edwin Hodgeman ... Dr. Dealgood
Bob Hornery ... Waterseller
Andrew Oh ... Ton Ton Tattoo
Ollie Hall Ollie Hall ... Aunty's Guard
Lee Rice Lee Rice ... Aunty's Guard
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Storyline

Left for dead in the unforgiving deserts of post-nuclear Australia, after defeating Lord Humungus' barbarian horde of bikers in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981), the former officer of the tough Main Force Patrol, Max Rockatansky, happens upon Bartertown: the remote market-town outpost in the middle of the dry Wasteland, and the realm of the autocratic Queen Aunty Entity. There, a lethal challenge awaits Max, who, in return for his freedom and provisions, must engage in a bloody match to the death with the grotesque symbiotic being, the Master/Blaster. However, an unforeseen complication after the brutal fight in the stronghold's combat arena, The Thunderdome, will banish, once more, Max into the vast wilderness, only to discover the peaceful haven of The Lost Tribe: a community of marooned children who survive on their own, waiting for the arrival of the legendary Captain Walker. Is "Mad" Max, indeed, their saviour? Can he overthrow Bartertown's ruthless tyrant? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Two men enter. One man leaves. See more »


Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The only film of the Mad Max franchise to earn a PG-13 rating. See more »

Goofs

When Max walks in the desert, we see him holding the monkey at his chest. However, when he abruptly falls, there is no sign of the monkey jumping from him, but we then see it alive and safe at the children's cave. See more »

Quotes

Auntie Entity: [the Blaster has reduced Bartertown's power supply] For God's sake, what now?
The Master: Who run Bartertown?
Auntie Entity: Dammit, I told you, no more embargos.
The Master: More, Blaster.
[the Blaster puts all power out]
The Master: Who run Bartertown? Who... run... Bartertown?
Auntie Entity: ...You know who.
The Master: Say.
Auntie Entity: Master Blaster.
The Master: Say loud!
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Dedication: "...for Byron" See more »

Alternate Versions

Scenes filmed but cut from the final film: Max comforting the dying Ghekko while facing Bartertown from the desert dunes and telling him it's Tomorrowmorrow land (this scene can be glimpsed in the Tina Turner video for We Don't Need Another Hero.) Max waking in Crack in Earth in the middle of the night and remembering his wife Jessie and crying, realising he is no better than the people he has hunted for so long. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Tod Browning's 'Freaks': The Sideshow Cinema (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

We Don't Need Another Hero (Thunderdome)
Written by Terry Britten and Graham Lyle
Performed by Tina Turner
Produced by Terry Britten
Copyright (c) 1985 Good Single Music Ltd. & My Axe Music Ltd.
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User Reviews

Watch and you will agree with the soundtrack song of Mad Max 3 - 'We don't need another hero.'
2 August 2003 | by Old JoeSee all my reviews

Mad Max 3 has shown me that this Australian film franchise is continuing to be big and successful. Part way through watching this movie, I felt that Mel Gibson was born to play the role of Mad Max, as he suits the character that was created. I was thinking that this film might have had a very 'Hollywood' feel to it. But to my surprise, I was glad to see and hear a very Australian flavour continuing, which has accompanied all the Mad Max movies to date.

Two men enter. One man leaves. That is the law in Bartertown's Thunderdome arena. But lawmaker Aunty Entity will soon add another: Do not get Max mad! Max is back as the hero who takes on the barbarians of the post-nuclear future - and this time becomes the savior of a tribe of lost children. However, the power-mad Aunty Entity, a dominatrix, is determined to use Max to tighten her stranglehold on Bartertown.

What was lacking in the second of the Mad Max movies was its script, which seemed to be underdeveloped, so I was hoping that the 'Beyond Thunderdome' would be better. Thankfully it was, as there was a lot more dialogue, some intriguing characters, and an even better story, which contained a lot of entertaining elements. I especially like the location of Bartertown, as it still had an 'Australian feel' to it, the idea of the Thunderdome was well explained and shown through the story. Then to have Max, be the protector of all these children made the story just that much better. MM3 was written once again by George Miller and Terry Hayes.

But George Miller also did so much more. He directed the third movie, giving it all the necessary touches that have made Mad Max, the movies they are today. Helping Miller in the director's chair is another George, director George Ogilvie. Having two directors I think only enhances the movie all the more. I like the way we see the famous 'Thunderdome' fighting scene, as Miller and Ogilvie focused very much on that event and the many elements within it. I also like the grand view of the open desert that we see numerous times through out the film, as both directors certainly wanted us to see that the conditions surrounding Bartertown were pretty harsh to both humans and animals. Credit for this section of the movie has to also go to the cinematographer, Dean Semler, who shot some great camera angles of the deserts.

MM3 also had some fine performers. Mad Max (Mel Gibson) shows that he is still a force to be reckoned with. His introduction to Aunty Entity (Tina Turner) was highly entertaining, as Max takes an impossible situation to show that he is a person not to be taken lightly. Max, for part of this movie, has long hair, which I believe gives Max an even more silent, heroic, darker edge to his character. However I was not a big fan of Tina Turner's performance in the film, as she did not seem at all in her place as an actress, but the look of her character was effective. Tina sings the song 'We don't need another hero' for the movie's soundtrack.

I also liked the actors with minor roles in the film. Max is told to separate Master-blaster, who is two identities. There is the very small and intelligent Master (Angelo Rossitto), and the very muscular Blaster (Paul Larsson), who Max has the huge encounter with in the Thunderdome. There was also a very Australian feel to this cast. Pigkiller (Robert Grubb) was a peculiar character that I immediately liked. He genuinely wants to help Max's cause in any way he can. Of the nastier looking guys, you have Ironbar (Angry Anderson), who might not have much to say, but has many lives in the film. In fact, many incidents with him are humorous and breathtaking as well. Back in MM3 is Jedediah (Bruce Spence), who now has a son, Jedediah Jnr. (Adam Cockburn). Max and Jedediah have a very clear understanding, which continues here. Another major component to the film is the use of pigs. I will not say why they are used here, just that I liked their presence every time they were onscreen.

There are some amazing scenes attached to MM3. I have to agree that the film contains one the best movie fight scenes ever, as Max and gladiatorial Blaster face off with maces, chainsaws and anything not nailed down inside Thunderdome. It is truly an exhilarating scene to see playing out, (although I cringed when I saw Max drop-start the chainsaw). However the customary car chase scene, which MM is famous for, was not as great here, as in the previous two movies. But it did have the fun sequence showing Ironbar barely escaping with his life many times. I enjoyed the lead up scenes to the car chase, as they had a lot of action and involvement of many people from the cast.

While, I like the characters we see in this movie, I do not believe they are as well developed as the people created for the first movie, as they were a lot easier to get to know, love and understand. I guess the big question after this movie is, 'which Mad Max is better, one or three?' I am still a bigger fan of the original, as it is a great film, showing that a small budget filmmaking can be very successful. That does not mean I am not a fan of this film, because I am. 'Beyond Thunderdome' had such a fine conclusion, that perhaps they should have left the 'status quo'. But hearing that a 4th film in the series is being made as we speak, says to me, that Mel Gibson, George Miller and his talented crew have more in store for Mad Max fans. I cannot wait!

CMRS gives 'Mad Max - Beyond Thunderdome': 3.5 (Good - Very Good Film)


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 July 1985 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,283,714, 14 July 1985

Gross USA:

$36,230,219

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$36,230,219
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby Stereo (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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