After being exiled from the most advanced town in post apocalyptic Australia, a drifter travels with a group of abandoned children to rebel against the town's queen.
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3,016 ( 71)
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mel Gibson ... Mad Max
Bruce Spence ... Jedediah
Adam Cockburn Adam Cockburn ... Jedediah Jnr.
Tina Turner ... Aunty Entity
Frank Thring ... The Collector
Angelo Rossitto ... The Master
Paul Larsson ... The Blaster
Angry Anderson ... Ironbar
Robert Grubb ... Pig Killer
George Spartels ... Blackfinger
Edwin Hodgeman ... Dr. Dealgood
Bob Hornery ... Waterseller
Andrew Oh ... Ton Ton Tattoo
Ollie Hall Ollie Hall ... Aunty's Guard
Lee Rice Lee Rice ... Aunty's Guard
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Storyline

Left for dead in the unforgiving deserts of post-nuclear Australia, after defeating Lord Humungus' barbarian horde of bikers in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981), the former officer of the tough Main Force Patrol, Max Rockatansky, happens upon Bartertown: the remote market-town outpost in the middle of the dry Wasteland, and the realm of the autocratic Queen Aunty Entity. There, a lethal challenge awaits Max, who, in return for his freedom and provisions, must engage in a bloody match to the death with the grotesque symbiotic being, the Master/Blaster. However, an unforeseen complication after the brutal fight in the stronghold's combat arena, The Thunderdome, will banish, once more, Max into the vast wilderness, only to discover the peaceful haven of The Lost Tribe: a community of marooned children who survive on their own, waiting for the arrival of the legendary Captain Walker. Is "Mad" Max, indeed, their saviour? Can he overthrow Bartertown's ruthless tyrant? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Max is back...and Tina's got him! See more »


Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film's theme, "We Don't Need Another Hero", sung by Tina Turner, reached number two on the U.S. charts, number three on the UK charts, and number one in Australia, in the summer of 1985. The song was recorded in London, England, with a backing choir from Kings House School containing, amongst others, a then twelve year old Lawrence Dallaglio. Dallaglio would go on to be a hugely successful rugby union player in England, playing domestically for Wasps RFC, and a member of the English World Cup winning side in 2003. See more »

Goofs

The sky goes from cloudy to clear in the climactic action scenes. See more »

Quotes

Master: Who you?
Max: Me Max.
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Crazy Credits

Mel Gibson, who plays Mad Max, is listed again among the Stunt Crew in the End Credits. See more »

Alternate Versions

Scenes filmed but cut from the final film: Max comforting the dying Ghekko while facing Bartertown from the desert dunes and telling him it's Tomorrowmorrow land (this scene can be glimpsed in the Tina Turner video for We Don't Need Another Hero.) Max waking in Crack in Earth in the middle of the night and remembering his wife Jessie and crying, realising he is no better than the people he has hunted for so long. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Hagan Reviews: Child Bride (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Toreador Song
from 'Carmen' (uncredited)
By Georges Bizet
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User Reviews

Underrated
20 April 1999 | by Spaz-11See all my reviews

When I first saw Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome, I felt disappointed. It was a letdown from its amazing predecessor. I knew its reputation as an unworthy sequel, but I still realized there was something good about it, something I had never heard from other people's points of view.

It wasn't until some time later when I watched the series a second time that I noticed what it was.

Those who think MMBT is not as exciting as The Road Warrior would be right. But those that think MMBT sucks because it is not as exciting as The Road Warrior would be missing the point. What makes MMBT a worthy sequel is its way of establishing a greater scope of the setting the series takes place in. The dredges of civilization were what set the stage for the series in the original Mad Max. The barren world of desert wastelands and sparse outposts take the idea of a post-apocalyptic world one step further in The Road Warrior. A squalid setting such as Bartertown and an oasis where the tribe of children lived in MMBT once again builds on the elaborate fantasy that makes the series as popular as it is. The final, chilling realization of just what became of civilization in the closing moments of the movie are more than enough explanation as to why the the world the viewer sees in the trilogy is the way it is.

I was too young when I first saw MMBT to understand this. It wouldn't be until I saw it again some time later, with more movie-viewing experience under my belt that I realized that what makes Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome tick is not action set pieces, but a far more subtle approach of atmospheric setting.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 July 1985 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,283,714, 14 July 1985

Gross USA:

$36,230,219

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$36,230,219
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby Stereo (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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